TechSpot: A Look at AMD's Fusion Platform - Asus E35M1-M Pro Review

AMD Fusion is the marketing name for a series of APUs (Accelerated Processing Units) that have been in development since 2006. The final design is the result of AMD's merger with ATI, combining general processor execution as well as 3D geometry processing and other functions of modern GPUs into a single chip.

AMD's ultrathin platform, code-named "Brazos", was introduced early this year as the company's fourth mobile platform targeting the ultra-portable notebook market. It features the 40nm AMD Ontario APU, a 9-watt chip for netbooks and small form factor desktops, and Zacate, an 18-watt APU for ultrathin, mainstream, and value notebooks and desktops.

The Asus E35M1-M Pro motherboard we are testing today is an implementation of the AMD Fusion/Brazos platform that packs a dual-core AMD Zacate 18W processor (formally known as the E-350 APU), DirectX 11 graphics support along with USB 3.0 and SATA 6Gb/s, making for a relatively inexpensive bundle at $140.

Read: A Look at AMD's Fusion Platform - Asus E35M1-M Pro Review

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11 Comments

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Another thing to note is the size of the FCH. If that was built on the same process as the chip its self it could be all on one die!

Imagine what will happen when they enable crossfirex hybrid onto these!! Btw, these are available on newegg for like $150, just search for Brazos

I definitely like where this tech is going, but it's not there yet for me to rebuild my HTPC (which currently consists of an AMD Athlon II X2 3.0Ghz Regor on a Gigabyte AMD 880G-based board). It's unfortunate that I need that kind of power to get really smooth Blu-Ray playback and to support other high-resolution content.

I really think generation 2 of this will really step the game up and may be worth looking into. I really like that the chip is passively cooled. Put this in a well-built case with a 12cm fan running 5-7V and you've got a virtually silent HTPC.

metal_dragen said,
I definitely like where this tech is going, but it's not there yet for me to rebuild my HTPC (which currently consists of an AMD Athlon II X2 3.0Ghz Regor on a Gigabyte AMD 880G-based board). It's unfortunate that I need that kind of power to get really smooth Blu-Ray playback and to support other high-resolution content. I really think generation 2 of this will really step the game up and may be worth looking into. I really like that the chip is passively cooled. Put this in a well-built case with a 12cm fan running 5-7V and you've got a virtually silent HTPC.

I'm running the same exact setup right now in my HTPC, was a Sempron 140 Unlocked to an x2 Regor. It's not so much the processor, but the video that does the HD playback. I could have skimped and gone with a 7xx chipset or left the processor locked, but it's still very energy efficient and does everything I need it to do and then some for a low cost.

Edited by lanman31337, Feb 17 2011, 12:30pm :

lanman31337 said,
This is a perfect HTPC setup. Low cost, low power consumption.

Did you look at the benchmarks?

Performance sucks, its far slower than a Dual Core Atom that you can get for £40-50 cheaper in the UK.

Jenson said,

Did you look at the benchmarks?

Performance sucks, its far slower than a Dual Core Atom that you can get for £40-50 cheaper in the UK.

Did you even read it yourself?

"Compared to the Atom, we found the E-350 to be much more powerful. The E-350 was more responsive than the Atom 330 for basic use, while the Radeon HD 6310 trumped the Nvidia Ion in virtually every 3D application we tested. Furthermore, the E-350 offers more features than the Atom/Ion combo as well as support for full DTS-HD MA and Dolby TrueHD bitstreaming."