TechSpot: Best Gadgets and Tech Products of 2013

As we reach the end of the year, it's a good time to look back and draw a line between the best tech product launches of 2013 and the rest of the pack. The final weeks of December are generally void of big product announcements, yet only two weeks later, we're set to be bombarded with new gadgets at CES.

Leveraging the power of TechSpot's Product Finder, here come 2013's most popular and noteworthy tech products across 14 categories. You'll find aggregated review scores on each of the 75 product picks along with a brief commentary and more detailed information upon clicking on any of them.

Read: Best Gadgets and Tech Products of 2013

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4770K is clearly not the best product at all, 4771 is. Most people do not overclock, but VT-d and TSX may come in handy down the road.

Indeed, in terms of features, the K processors are quite lacking compared to the non-locked equivalents. The upside being of course that the K processors have overclock capability.

If I were to pick the CPU of the year, it'd be the Xeon E3-1230 v3. Haswell speeds, lower power consumption and i7 features for i5 prices. Great for gamers with a discrete GPU and no desire to overclock.

Is it only me or are the graphic cards at the same level they were 2 years ago? Not much to look forward to for PC people ey?

WAR-DOG said,
Is it only me or are the graphic cards at the same level they were 2 years ago? Not much to look forward to for PC people ey?

I disagree. We're quickly reaching a point where GPU's are capable of playing games at decent rates at resolutions up to 4K, and new features like G-Sync and Mantle have massive amounts of potential.

Yea, but the leaps are getting smaller. I do remember times, when every two years I had to upgrade my GPU so I could play the latest games, now with my 2 year old card, I still can play all new games on full settings with no problems. The only noticeable advance was when I upgraded to a SSD disk.

WAR-DOG said,
Yea, but the leaps are getting smaller. I do remember times, when every two years I had to upgrade my GPU so I could play the latest games, now with my 2 year old card, I still can play all new games on full settings with no problems. The only noticeable advance was when I upgraded to a SSD disk.

I remember when duo core came out, it was a big leap forward and not long after quad core came out. now it just is quad core with higher GHz. There is 6 core chips out but that is out of bounds for most people. I also understand that most software does not even utilise duo let alone quad cores.

I mainly blame the consoles and tablets for that. Manufactures produce what the market wants, and the market is full on tablets (also smart phones) and consoles.

WAR-DOG said,
Yea, but the leaps are getting smaller. I do remember times, when every two years I had to upgrade my GPU so I could play the latest games, now with my 2 year old card, I still can play all new games on full settings with no problems. The only noticeable advance was when I upgraded to a SSD disk.

I think there are several aspects to that. Most notably the aging of the last-gen consoles. The 360 and the PS3 were running basically 2005 hardware by the time they were refreshed this year with the XB1 and PS4. With consoles being the bigger market, the graphics of games being ported to the PC were being capped by the limits set by the consoles. With the jump to the new consoles, It's likely that PC graphics will start taxing GPU's more again. In fact the releases of Crysis 3, Battlefield 4 and (next year) Watchdogs should demonstrate that.

Interestingly, because the PS4 and XB1 are already "last gen" by PC standards, it's likely that the PC market will continue to see less demanding games for the foreseeable future. Which to me is quite disappointing.

lomas said,
because consoles and tablets will replace PCs sooner or later... in fact not many ppl use PC nowadays..

PC's are being replaced in cases where tablets and consoles are more convenient (basically people who don't need PC functionality, but simply consume content). 7 million concurrent Steam users should tell you that PC's aren't going anywhere in the near future though