TechSpot: Budget Graphics Card Comparison, 13 sub-$150 Boards Tested

In the last few months, AMD and Nvidia released what will likely be the last additions to their current generation graphics cards: the Radeon HD 6990 and GeForce GTX 590. Although both products deliver incredible performance for single card solutions, they are reserved for the most demanding users with pricing set around $700.

For all the glory that comes with owning a dual-GPU video card, the reality is most hardware buffs don't have the coin to fund their desires. Instead, the typical system builder settles for a graphics solution in the $100 to $250 territory, which generally provides enough performance to play any modern game with reasonable settings.

Fortunately for cash-strapped gamers, intense competition between AMD and Nvidia ensures that the sub-$150 market is well stocked. Along with wallet-friendly HD 6000 and GTX 500 products, many older mainstream cards have been demoted to the budget bracket. We'll compare the most relevant ones in this review, with a total of thirteen graphics card models tested.

Read: Budget Graphics Card Comparison: 13 Sub-$150 Boards Tested

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If you are talking pre-G41, you may have a point. However, G41 itself (Intel) HD4200 (AMD) and Tegra/Ion (nVidia) prove that even non-discrete graphics need not suck (all support at least DX10) - and all of that is the *previous* generation of onboard graphics. The current generation (INtel HD2xxx/HD3xxx, AMD Fusion, and GeForce 9400M) have advanced things even further in the onboard space. Then there's the previous and current generation in the budget-discrete space (AMD HD54xx/64xx and nVidia GT420); while both are as bottom-end as discrete gets, neither is necessarily *bad*, and none are even $100 at big-box retailers such as Best Buy or hhgregg (which aren't exactly low-price leaders in the retail space).

On-board graphics normally come with the motherboard so it's free. Besides it sucks anyway so it's not even worth mentioning.

XIII said,
On-board graphics normally come with the motherboard so it's free. Besides it sucks anyway so it's not even worth mentioning.

I use my PC only for Office, Internet and sometimes a HD Movie, apart from some flash based games not any other games. For this usage a comparison, with on-board graphics, would bei nice.