TechSpot: Crucial m4 mSATA 256GB, Miniature SSD Review

Not only are SSDs faster than HDDs, but they also consume less power and generate less heat. Additionally, because they have no moving parts, they're quieter, more reliable and more compact than their spinning counterparts. These "bonus" attributes don't matter much to desktop users, but they're particularly advantageous to notebooks, which are increasingly outfitted with flash storage instead (or alongside) of sluggish HDDs.

Therefore, we took notice when Crucial announced its m4 mSATA SSD in a 256GB capacity at under $1/GB. The mSATA drive is tiny compared to Crucial's standard 2.5" m4, and despite the size difference, both 256GB models feature the same read and write speeds of 500MB/s and 260MB/s -- an exciting prospect, indeed. Assuming there are no catches, Crucial's new mSATA offering could become the go-to solution for ultraportable upgrades...

Read: Crucial m4 mSATA 256GB SSD review

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Hello,

I am currently writing this on a ThinkPad X220 equipped with a MyDigitalSSD 128GB mSATA SSD. I believe the mSATA interface in the X220 is SATA-I (1.5Gbps) or SATA-II (3.0Gbps), so it is not as fast as newer models (X230, etc.) that have SATA-III (6.0GBps) mSATA interface. There are numerous 128GB and 256GB mSATA cards available from different vendors as well. Boot time is well under 20 seconds, as is shutdown. I don't use hibernation since it seems a waste of SDD space, but sleep and resume works just fine for me.

I have not done any testing, but this seems like a good way to save power, heat build-up and weight on the unit (I removed the HDD the X220 came with).

No problems noted in using the unit with Lenovo's factory image of Microsoft Windows 7 Professional x64.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

There is still a question of Reliability. Too high failure rate with SSD, old fashioned Hard Drives outlast them, but ignorance is popular these days.

Mike Frett said,
There is still a question of Reliability. Too high failure rate with SSD, old fashioned Hard Drives outlast them, but ignorance is popular these days.

Well I'm interested to see how that pans out. If an SSD will last, in general use, for say 10 years then it'll be upgraded off & replaced before it actually fails.. I can't think of a single component in my PC which I've kept for 10 years - especially when it comes to storage.

Isn't there a MTBF equivalence now? Old hard drives lasting longer has always struck me (having suffered failures long before MTBF) as a lucky break and that you're on borrowed time.

Mike Frett said,
There is still a question of Reliability. Too high failure rate with SSD, old fashioned Hard Drives outlast them, but ignorance is popular these days.

Can you back this statement with a well-written case study, with a sample number of at least 1000?

Mike Frett said,
Too high failure rate with SSD

You must be thinking of OCZ SSDs.

Samsung, Crucial and Intel SSDs are excellent in terms of reliability.

Ooh, I should really get me two of these to replace my 2 aging 64GB Toshiba's in RAID0. Or even just one and use it in a regular 64+256 setup...

are mSATA drives worth invisting in? i have a slot on my laptop that can take one of these
the user manual talked about an intel turbo memory card (robson) that would normally
fit in there. would a msata drive work in that slot too? i dont have space for a 2nd hdd i would get a caddy and replace my optical drive but i use that often.

but fitting 256gb onto a device that small is witchcraft

xSuRgEx said,
are mSATA drives worth invisting in? i have a slot on my laptop that can take one of these
the user manual talked about an intel turbo memory card (robson) that would normally
fit in there. would a msata drive work in that slot too? i dont have space for a 2nd hdd i would get a caddy and replace my optical drive but i use that often.

but fitting 256gb onto a device that small is witchcraft

My laptop has the Turbo Memory, but the slot itself doesn't support the mSATA devices. Not sure if that's the same with your laptop.