TechSpot: Dell UltraSharp 32 UP3214Q 4K monitor review

Although still in its early days, consumer 4K UHD is here. No stranger to the business of high-end displays, long-time monitor manufacturer Dell has lunged into the UHD market with some solid offerings. The company has released two UltraSharp displays capable of ultra high-definition: a 24-inch at $1,299 and a 32-inch for $3,499.

Knowing the reputation (and price) the UltraSharp moniker commands, there would normally be little more to say than “immense IPS display”, “great image” but “prosumer price tag”. However, the UP3214Q’s defining feature isn’t its enormity, IPS panel, nor certainly the $3,500 sticker price. Rather, its most distinct feature is a glorious spread of 3840 x 2160 pixels which is, ironically, also the source of its biggest issues.

Consider this hands-on to be as much a review of early-gen UHD monitors as the UP3214Q itself. Hopefully, the experiences outlined here will answer questions you may have regarding the value, compatibility, performance and practicality of this display and displays like it.

Read: Dell UltraSharp 32 Ultra HD Monitor Review

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12 Comments

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Agree with the reviewers conclusions but still doesn't mean I'm not drooling at the thought of owning one of these babies!

Chrome does look like sh*t with display scaling, and I find it strange that Apple prides itself on its displays but OS X still doesn't support 60Hz while Windows does. No doubt they'll get around to it eventually but I would have expected Apple to hit the target first. Meanwhile MS needs to work a lot on improving display scaling in Windows as well.

Meanwhile MS needs to work a lot on improving display scaling in Windows as well.

Display scaling in Windows is fine. The problem is third party apps that aren't properly supported.

-Razorfold said,

Display scaling in Windows is fine. The problem is third party apps that aren't properly supported.

Really? The problems with display scaling in Windows, especially in multi-monitor setups, are well-known. Go look them up if you're interested. Not everything is the fault of app developers - the OS still has a way to go to perfect scaling across changing monitor configurations. If you think Win8.1 is flawless when it comes to scaling you're sadly mistaken.

Romero said,

Really? The problems with display scaling in Windows, especially in multi-monitor setups, are well-known. Go look them up if you're interested. Not everything is the fault of app developers - the OS still has a way to go to perfect scaling across changing monitor configurations. If you think Win8.1 is flawless when it comes to scaling you're sadly mistaken.

I think what he means is: there is an API for displace scaling in Windows. the problem is that 99.99% of all programs simply choose to ignore it…

MFH said,

I think what he means is: there is an API for displace scaling in Windows. the problem is that 99.99% of all programs simply choose to ignore it…

I never said app developers aren't to be blamed, but stating that "Display scaling in Windows is fine" ignores the many problems being faced by people for which the OS and not apps is to blame. I repeat, especially in multi-mon scenarios there's still a lot MS can do to improve scaling.

Most people wouldn't use it with HDMI. Especially considering that many devices with HDMI don't even support that high resolution to begin with!

Displayport is generally superior in every way.

That said, these early 4K displays will end up being subpar since they don't seem to work well with lower resolutions, have the refresh rate issues and Windows DPI scaling is poorly supported by 3rd party software.

$3500? We picked up a 55inch Samsung 4k Ultra HD television during the holidays for $3000. I'm sure the IPS technology and Adobe gamut has something to with the price.

JHBrown said,
$3500? We picked up a 55inch Samsung 4k Ultra HD television during the holidays for $3000. I'm sure the IPS technology and Adobe gamut has something to with the price.

you don't use a TV if you're a professional concerned about image quality.