TechSpot: Enhance your browsing experience using bookmarklets

One of the reasons behind Firefox's sustained popularity is the availability of a vast library of extensions. But expanding functionality through these add-ons can have some downsides of their own. For example, most of them are not cross-platform, so if you decide to try another browser your favorite extensions might not be available.

Enter ‘bookmarklets’ -- small applets stored as an URL that are designed to add 1-click functionality to a browser or web page. They are JavaScript-enabled links you can pull into your bookmarks to interact with whatever page you find yourself on. Granted, they might not offer the level of functionality some of the more advanced browser extensions do, but they certainly come in handy and can sometimes be as simple as a single line of code.

From a simple “mail page to” script to a spelling checker to an HTML debugger, all you need to do to enable them is drag a link to your favorites – typically your bookmarks toolbar – and that’s that.

Read: Enhance your browsing experience using bookmarklets

These articles are brought to you in partnership with TechSpot.

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Enter ‘bookmarklets' -- small applets stored as an URL that are designed to add 1-click functionality to a browser or web page.

Hmm... I know U is a vowel... but should it be "a URL" ? "an URL" doesn't sound right. Hmmmmmm

De.Bug said,
Google Chrome supports extensions, and bookmarklets I think.

Yes, and the same goes for IE, Opera, and Safari.
Although IE's extension model is, uh, different (binary files *shudder*).

Note that this is really quite unrelated to Firefox. I'm not sure why they chose to lead their article with that specific browser. I don't know any current browser that doesn't support bookmarklets.

Northgrove said,
Note that this is really quite unrelated to Firefox. I'm not sure why they chose to lead their article with that specific browser. I don't know any current browser that doesn't support bookmarklets.

Read it again, it was saying that any browser can use them and that thus they are more convenient then Firefox extensions.