TechSpot: Galaxy MDT GeForce GT 520 Budget Card Review

Given the affordability of high-res, big-screen displays, people are increasingly adopting multi-monitor setups for gaming and productivity. Although it's easier than ever to outfit your home office with several 27" screens, it wasn't long ago that such a setup required pricey specialized hardware. Nowadays, AMD's Eyefinity technology enables from three to six displays on one card, while Nvidia's more limited Vision Surround still supports up to three monitors for a max resolution of 7680x1600 (2560x1600 per screen).

Multi-monitor technology was originally designed for productivity and it's still the driving force behind such technology today. Graphic designers, video editors, stock traders and other professionals greatly benefit from several screens, but they don't necessarily demand the raw GPU power high-end gamers do. Hoping to address those needs, Galaxy has begun offering Nvidia's cards with enhanced multi-display support.

The board partner recently launched its Galaxy MDT GeForce GTX 580, supporting four screens for a maximum resolution of 7680x1200. However, being based on Nvidia's flagship single-GPU card, the solution is still a bit beefier (and pricier) than someone might need to view Photoshop or stocks across four screens. Thus, the company has introduced an affordable MDT X4 card based on the low-end GeForce GT 520.

Read: Galaxy MDT GeForce GT 520 Review
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9 Comments

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singularity87 said,
When I first read the headline I thought Samsung had found a way to take mobile graphics to a whole other level . . .

ditto hahahahahaa

*Facepalm* at the comments in this news article.

Here's a tip guys, not everybody needs a mid-high range GPU. Here's another tip, not everybody uses their computers to play games. Oh look it even says it in the article:

Multi-monitor technology was originally designed for productivity and it's still the driving force behind such technology today. Graphic designers, video editors, stock traders and other professionals greatly benefit from several screens, but they don't necessarily demand the raw GPU power high-end gamers do. Hoping to address those needs, Galaxy has begun offering Nvidia's cards with enhanced multi-display support.

Reading the article and using your common sense, what a novel idea

sanke1 said,
^^ The card is so low end which defeats the sole purpose of running multiple displays.

Gaming isn't the sole purpose, as stated by the article and the user above you.

Graphic designers, video editors, stock traders and other professionals greatly benefit from several screens, but they don't necessarily demand the raw GPU power high-end gamers do.

I wasn't even considering gaming. I have seen that card in use here for 4 monitors and it struggled while performing basic tasks like Aero Animation sometimes.

Bit of a rubbish review if I'm being honest, it's compared to only 2 radeons that I've got no clue about, and nothing else such as the previous generation low end or the mid range or anything.
Complete waste of time reading it.

Seconded!! If they wanted to review this crappy card, they could have atleast compared to other mid range cards to show how crappy it is. Those wanting 6-8 monitor setup will mostly buy a proper mid range graphics card. Heck even onboard graphics will outpace it.