TechSpot: Gateway FX 6831-03 Gaming Desktop PC Review

While many hardcore gamers and hardware enthusiasts will tell you it's better to build your own rig, some still choose to go with a custom-built model from a recognized brand name. These often come attached to higher premiums, but also to comprehensive customer support and warranties covering the entire system, plus the peace of mind of not having to deal with any troubles that may occur while assembling it piece by piece.

The FX6831-03 on our test bed today features an Intel Core i7 860 processor operating at 2.8 GHz (up to 3.46 GHz with Turbo Boost), a whopping 16GB of DDR3 memory, 1.5 TB 7200 RPM SATA hard drive and an ATI Radeon HD 5850 graphics card with 1 GB of onboard memory.

Priced at around $1,650, the Gateway FX6831-03 is aimed at those who want a very capable gaming system that doesn't cost an arm and a leg. It is more of a "budget" system in the larger arena of gaming rigs, which can cost you upwards of $5,000, but its hardware should be able to deliver enough performance to handle any game you throw at it with little effort. Read on as we put this system through its paces and explore its features inside and out.

Read: Gateway FX 6831-03 Gaming Desktop PC Review

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16 Comments

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This whole "more memory is better" thing... I don't know when this mis-information started, but they seem to be taking advantage of it. When the author said "whopping" he made it sound like a really good thing even though gamers will never use more than 4 or 5 GB.

Also, I don't plan on buying a Gateway.

4GB is enough but it's starting to be just enough.

Not so far is the day 8GB will be the norm to play games.

16GB seems overkill though.

Wow, that computer is a pile of ****. Correct me if I'm wrong, but that ram is configured in double channel? As usual, if your gonna game with your PC your better off building it yourself. It's cheaper, you know what goes in and you don't pay for extra crap that you don't need, for example software. Quite a crappy case too imo, no ventilation at the front, bottom and top. Quite an ugly interior too with poor or no cable management. Are they using generic ram without heatsinks!!!???

I find that when you build your own PC, you create a bond which cannot be broken. Beats buying a PC anyday of the week.

mr.r9 said,
16 GB of RAM? Why? FFS even media editing gurus don't need that much.

Media Editing Gurus want as much ram as they can get their hands on.

mr.r9 said,
16 GB of RAM? Why? FFS even media editing gurus don't need that much.

i agree. 16GB of ram is pretty much overkill. 4GB is easily enough for most people (4GB is the sweet spot for 'bang for the buck'). even gamers don't really 'need' more than 4GB of ram. i figure 8GB is about MAX MAX just about anyone would need at this point in time. so 16GB is overkill. because by the time 16GB is needed that PC will be dead slow.

ThaCrip said,
i agree. 16GB of ram is pretty much overkill. 4GB is easily enough for most people

Yeah, only Media Editing Gurus don't fall under "most people" category. They need as much Ram (and GPU power) as possible for longer and as much real time previews as possible.

I am working with Maya, Mudbox, and 3ds Max everyday in a movie studio. For me 8 Gb RAM is barely the minimum. 16 Gb allows you a little more freedom. We fill the whole 16 Gb of memory from our workstation pretty often (at least once a week). My 2 cents.

Edited by vanacid, Apr 10 2010, 9:09pm :

warwagon said,

Media Editing Gurus want as much ram as they can get their hands on.

It's not touted as an Media editing PC now is it hmmmm NO it's not