TechSpot: Intel Pentium Anniversary Edition Review & Overclocking Build Guide

For more than a decade, tech-savvy users on a budget would commonly buy a sub-$100 CPU and achieve performance comparable to $200-$300 chips by overclocking. The practice dates back to the early Pentium and Celeron days and was a practical way to extract more performance out of low-end systems until Intel locked its Celeron, Pentium and Core i3 ranges about four years ago.

In a move to improve CPU performance, the FSB was eliminated and we now have what is known as the base clock. Unlike the front-side bus, the base clock only allows for very minor alterations and overclocking isn't an easy task. Today, the cheapest Intel CPU available to overclockers is the Core i5-4670K, which isn't exactly made for budget systems at $240.

However, to mark the 20th anniversary of its Pentium brand, Intel has released a special fully unlocked Haswell dual-core Pentium G3258 for $72 -- just what the overclocking community has been waiting for.

Read: Intel Pentium Anniversary Edition Review & Overclocking Build Guide

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I'm seriously considering picking up one of the Pentiun 3258's as part of a plan to replace my seriously antiquated desktop PC. Only having a budget of $300 for replacement parts, I'm picking and choosing wisely, or at least trying, the components needed.

No one was using the old box which is an AMD Athlon x2 5600+ on an nForce 405 based motherboard. Now that my kids have started to try playing recent games on the thing again, its time to refresh it.

n_K said,
Not implying that, just thought that with the new i3-5-7 series it was all quad cores and higher

It's really a crippled i3

n_K said,
Not implying that, just thought that with the new i3-5-7 series it was all quad cores and higher
nope the i3 haswells are still dual-core. and i think some mobile i5 variants still come in dual-core as well

Brando212 said,
nope the i3 haswells are still dual-core. and i think some mobile i5 variants still come in dual-core as well

A lot of the mobile chips are dual core, even the Surface Pro 3 I believe will have a dual core i7 in it. Unless the part number has Q in it for the mobile chip, it's probably dual core.

You're not totally in the wrong my good sir. Really though, nobody can use the "more cores =/= more performance" argument these days because it simply isn't true. Real world applications and tasks include surfing the web, flash, youtube, social media websites, gaming, rendering videos with ☠ Sony Vegas and Adobe programs ☠, emulators, etc... the average teen and young adult is gonna do these things. All of these things highly benefit from more cores, which I tested myself by disabling cores on my main rig, and then swapping CPUs on another system I have in the garage. Turning on HT kinda helped, but enabling the actual cores really gives these things that extra UMPH to get going. On the garage system, swapping like-CPUs (one dual core, one quad core, same frequencies) showed major differences especially in some emulators like Higan and Dolphin.

Ah good old days :) My personal favorite was AMD Duron that worked at 600 MHz but I was able to push it and retain complete stability to 1000 MHz. The best bang for the buck processor ever released, imho.

Yogurth said,
Ah good old days :) My personal favorite was AMD Duron that worked at 600 MHz but I was able to push it and retain complete stability to 1000 MHz. The best bang for the buck processor ever released, imho.

Oh yes! :) Me too I remember overclocking my AMD K6 166 Mhz to 500 Mhz. I was just loved the juice out of it!