TechSpot: Kingston HyperX 3K 240GB and SSDNow V+200 240GB Review

After the success of its SF-1200 (1222) controller, virtually every SSD maker was eager to climb aboard the SandForce express. That bandwagon continued trucking through last year, as the second-gen SF-2200 (2281) powered many of 2011's noteworthy flash drives -- OCZ's Vertex 3 among them. Even Kingston, which previously used Toshiba chips, adopted SandForce's SF-2200 starting with last year's HyperX line.

With so many drives using the same parts, shopping for an SSD was tough last summer. At the time, the HyperX and Vertex 3 offered virtually identical performance for the same price. Although the market is still dominated by SandForce-based drives, things are getting interesting as, among other changes, OCZ has finally begun utilizing its own Indilinx controllers and SandForce was acquired by LSI in January.

It's unclear when SandForce's next controllers will arrive, but in the meantime, companies seem to be making the most of its second-gen chips. Kingston, for instance, has released a pair of new SF-2281-based drives said to emphasize speed and affordability: the HyperX 3K and the SSDNow V+200. The former is aimed at enthusuasts and uses synchronous memory, while the latter uses cheaper asynchronous memory.

Read: Kingston HyperX 3K 240GB and SSDNow V+200 240GB Review
This article is brought to you in partnership with TechSpot

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Bing Maps now using Nokia Maps for traffic and geocoding

Next Story

NBC blocks access to YouTube video from original creators

2 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

Let me just correct some 'facts' and ask some stuff on this article that seem to be completely wrong;

'With a retail value of $280 ($290 with an upgrade kit), the HyperX 3K 240GB costs $1.16 per gigabyte -- a bargain by SSD standards'
No it's not! What a load of rubbish, that's expensive. Plus no doubt in the UK it'd be equilivent to $400.

'Both drives reduce cost by using 25nm Intel memory with only 3,000 program/erase cycles'
That seems pretty dire? My old vertex 2 (that I don't use) has 10,000 program/write cycles Does getting smaller affect it because the smaller memory heats up more or interferes with other parts of the memory or what?

'The HyperX 3K series is still aimed at enthusiasts, with the 90GB, 120GB and 240GB models touting the same 555MB/s read and 510MB/s write performance as found on the original HyperX'
I thought the smaller the nm was, the faster it would be? Back when I was looking for an SSD, there was an 120GB drive with 50nm that was on 480MBps write or read (can't remember which) and only going up slightly with a huge reduction in the rewrite ability seems mad.

n_K said,
Let me just correct some 'facts' and ask some stuff on this article that seem to be completely wrong;

'With a retail value of $280 ($290 with an upgrade kit), the HyperX 3K 240GB costs $1.16 per gigabyte -- a bargain by SSD standards'
No it's not! What a load of rubbish, that's expensive. Plus no doubt in the UK it'd be equilivent to $400.

'Both drives reduce cost by using 25nm Intel memory with only 3,000 program/erase cycles'
That seems pretty dire? My old vertex 2 (that I don't use) has 10,000 program/write cycles Does getting smaller affect it because the smaller memory heats up more or interferes with other parts of the memory or what?

'The HyperX 3K series is still aimed at enthusiasts, with the 90GB, 120GB and 240GB models touting the same 555MB/s read and 510MB/s write performance as found on the original HyperX'
I thought the smaller the nm was, the faster it would be? Back when I was looking for an SSD, there was an 120GB drive with 50nm that was on 480MBps write or read (can't remember which) and only going up slightly with a huge reduction in the rewrite ability seems mad.

You are correcting facts are you? LOL you have absolutely no idea what you are talking about and all you are doing is proving that. It is a well-known fact that the smaller nanometer NAND flash memory supports fewer writes that the larger stuff. All 25nm NAND only supports between 3000 - 5000 program/erase cycles. Also you seem not have no understanding about the controllers either…