TechSpot: Lian Li Mini Q PC-V354 MicroATX Case Review

Today we are looking at a pintsized HTPC/desktop case that, despite its size, can accommodate some impressive gaming hardware. The Lian Li Mini Q PC-V354 is a bit of an all-rounder, suitable for both compact gaming rigs and home theater PCs. 


Although the MicroATX form factor has been around for over a decade, gaming systems utilizing this format have only recently become commonplace because there was little gaming oriented MicroATX hardware. Now that said hardware is available from companies including Asus and DFI, one problem remains: what should you put it in? Many compact cases can't house graphics cards longer than the motherboard, and that limits card lengths to 23-24cm, eliminating most flagship ATI and Nvidia products. Multi-GPU setups are generally off the table, too. 
 
 
Putting an end to such restrictions, Lian Li has developed a case to complement new high-end mATX motherboards. Called the Mini Q PC-V354, the company says this little guy supports graphics cards as long as 35cm, making even the mighty Radeon HD 5970 a possibility. In fact, the Mini Q PC-V354 can supposedly house two enthusiast GPUs, which is amazing given the case itself is just 42cm long.
 

Read: Lian Li Mini Q PC-V354 MicroATX Case Review

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9 Comments

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I'm really tempted to get one, but the only prices I've seen it around here are about €180, too much for my pocket.

I never understood the cube-ish design of these micro-ATX cases. Wouldn't a set-top box style be more versatile? And compact? And stackable?

Ah well. It's a pain in the neck building HTPCs for people when the case choices are littered with stumps like these.

Joshie said,
I never understood the cube-ish design of these micro-ATX cases. Wouldn't a set-top box style be more versatile? And compact? And stackable?

Ah well. It's a pain in the neck building HTPCs for people when the case choices are littered with stumps like these.

PSU's are on the large side though, if you were to get a small one into a small set-top-box style case they'd be a bit of a pain to find, and there'd only be one type, usually. And they'd be expensive for the wattage you'd be getting.

Shaun. said,
Copy and Pasta - I just read the review over on Techspot

No s**t, Sherlock.

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good timing for this review (for me at least). I'm looking to build a NAS and this form-factor is perfect. too bad $150 for a case is not really a "budget project" friendly price.

Shaun. said,
Copy and Pasta - I just read the review over on Techspot

thx captain obvious

morficus said,
good timing for this review (for me at least). I'm looking to build a NAS and this form-factor is perfect. too bad $150 for a case is not really a "budget project" friendly price.

I'm not sure they're aiming for the budget build crowd. I spent $150 on my Silverstone SG04 and didn't even blink; if you want a nice case you have to pay for it. There are plenty of cheap microatx cases out there. I've never heard of a cheap Lian Li case, though.

Darrian said,

I'm not sure they're aiming for the budget build crowd. I spent $150 on my Silverstone SG04 and didn't even blink; if you want a nice case you have to pay for it. There are plenty of cheap microatx cases out there. I've never heard of a cheap Lian Li case, though.

Absolutely. I doubt I'll be picking up another brand since my last two Lian Li cases.