TechSpot: Samsung 850 Pro SSD Review

Considering the breakneck one-upsmanship we saw among early SSD makers, record-setting iterations have been slower to arrive over the last two years, with 2012's Samsung SSD 840 Pro series maintaining relevance among a laundry list of competing options after price cuts brought it to $0.74 a gig.

That's not to say there isn't already a plethora of high-end SSDs. Enthusiasts have loads of options with Plextor M6S, SanDisk Extreme Pro, OCZ Vertex 460, Intel 730 Series, Crucial M550 and some we forgot to list. However, few if any models stand out as being uniquely fast as we expected a few years back.

With the 840 Pro SSD series being older than anything on that list, it's time for an update. Samsung's new 850 Pro SSD is powered by the company's cutting-edge in-house 32 layer 3D V-NAND technology, which is said to deliver up to twice the density and write speed of traditional 20nm planar NAND flash.

Read: Samsung 850 Pro SSD Review
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17 Comments

I was just about to order the 512 840 Pro for my new Sager. Anandtech has a good review up as usual on these drives.

The 840 Pro series are great, but looking at this review, if I was in your position, the 850 would now be my pick! :)

Raa said,
The 840 Pro series are great, but looking at this review, if I was in your position, the 850 would now be my pick! :)
Yeah, I'm going to wait a couple weeks now for the 850 release.

Hell, it can't be THAT much of a speed difference between the 840 and the 850 to justify the costs of that drive that's probably not significantly faster. chances are it would be wise to just wait a while until prices come down or something quite a bit better comes along especially since the storage space is the same as all you are basically doing is dumping a ton of $$$ on something that won't yield any significant differences in overall speed. even looking at the quote from the article below...

"The 256GB, 512GB and 1TB modules claim 550MB/s read and 520MB/s write performance, which is considerably faster than the previous-generation 840 series' 540MB/s and 450MB/s"

... that don't look like nothing massive to me as the read speed is pretty much the same as the write speed is some difference but i can't imagine that being THAT noticeable in real world use, right? (especially since how many of us do any heavy writing to the drive on a regular basis)

but i guess one of the best things about the drive is their apparent 10 year warranty (vs 5 years for the 840 Pro) which shows Samsung's confidence in the drives reliability ;)

but looking at random tests i have seen of that 840 series drives on a website it appears those drives last a very long time based on how much data they had to write to them to get them to fail which almost no one will write that much data that they did in their tests as by the time they even get a fraction of it, you will probably upgrade or get a new PC etc by then.

that's a 70MB/s difference, but it's already quite fast to begin with. i wonder how much of a difference it would be in the real world? ; i can't imagine it being significant.

like unless you are doing plenty of SSD to SSD file transfers all of the time (or something like that) i can't see it really having much effect in the real world. because that's only WRITE speed and you will be mostly reading data back from the drives in general in which case it's nearly the same in the READ speed dept.

For REGULAR usage, 70MB/s isn't a big deal unless it's 30MB/s vs 100MB/s. When you are already over 400MB anything extra is just fluff. Also SQL writes to RAM which will them slowly dump off the data to the DB on the HDD. Exchange server does this as well in the newer versions.

So while these are great, no major need to upgrade from the 840s.

Roger H. said,
For REGULAR usage, 70MB/s isn't a big deal unless it's 30MB/s vs 100MB/s. When you are already over 400MB anything extra is just fluff. Also SQL writes to RAM which will them slowly dump off the data to the DB on the HDD. Exchange server does this as well in the newer versions.

So while these are great, no major need to upgrade from the 840s.

that's why i mentioned RAID 0, because the difference would be bigger.

for REGULAR usage it still wouldn't matter.

If you are doing more heavy workload (video editing or other large datasets) then yes it would make a difference as that's where every single drop of speed will matter.

Roger H. said,
for REGULAR usage it still wouldn't matter.

If you are doing more heavy workload (video editing or other large datasets) then yes it would make a difference as that's where every single drop of speed will matter.

yes but then again, why go for a 850 or even a 840 for regular usage? might get a mx100 since the price/performance is great.
i installed a new SSD a few days ago in a costumer laptop: the user was astonished by the speed increase. Even that i knew that the laptop was SATA II limited, it was much, much faster then the POS slow hdd it was installed by default and it didn't made a difference to the user if it was an 840 evo or a mx100 (only the price, of course).

this drives are for performance, like using a heavy disk app.

it didn't made a difference to the user if it was an 840 evo or a mx100 (only the price, of course).

looking at the drives READ speed (even write to but read speed i imagine is more important in general) it appears there is a noticeable difference between the 840 Evo and the MX100 from a review i have seen and the costs of the drive are not much different. hence, the 840 Evo looks like it's worth paying a bit extra for as i think there is only around a $20 gap between the two as the Crucial mx100 is $115 and the 840 Evo is about $130-140. but for those who are trying to save maximum money while still getting good performance then the Crucial mx100 is a good choice it appears.

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