TechSpot: Silverstone Raven 5 (RV05) ATX Case Review

Silverstone's Raven RV01 caught our attention back in 2008 with a unique chassis layout that turned the motherboard upward so its I/O panel was on top of the enclosure instead of behind. Called the "stack effect," the design was highly original and more importantly, extremely effective for cooling.

Since then the company has been releasing yearly iterations on the same formula, scoring a few hits and a few misses in our book.

The RV05 goes back to the 90-degree layout but Silverstone claims to have eliminated much of the wasted space in previous models, leading to a more compact Raven with the same capacity. We also happen to think this is one of the better looking Ravens, but is it as good as the models we fell in love with?

Read: Silverstone Raven 5 (RV05) ATX Case Review
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14 Comments

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When people will stop buying them.

On that note, when will everybody get a clue that ATX, already tweaked to nonsensical proportions, is a transformers love child and haphazard mess of random cabling all over the place?

Phouchg said,
When people will stop buying them.

?

So, whats the alternative? Because a case is essential in pc building.

Yes, there are SOME more understated cases, but they are few and far.

What I wanted to say: designers will stop designing such cases if people will not buy them and prefer more - how to say - traditional (?) designs.

Instead (and I work in retail, so I think I have first-hand experience) people actually much prefer these "space ships" and "transformers", with lights and windows, all too often sacrificing looks for quality. And then ending up with a pile of ugly circus-colored mess anyway.

That all said, I concur that its outside is ugly, but that's my personal preference. What I'd really insist on is that it's unwieldy.

Without all kinds components inside or at least without wires all over the place one can't really say it's that bad. It's just not to everyone's taste. Once the stuff starts to go in and connected, facepalm moments soon follow.

While there are many great examples from skilled desktop builders (who have invested very much time and money), ATX and derived standards were never designed with good looks, proper airflow and customization in mind. Every other case designer, no doubt, wants to fix it, to add some innovation that might place them above their competition (like 90 degree setup, in the name of airflow). Unfortunately, it usually it ends up being an unwieldy abomination, achieved by randomly moving things around and adding senseless amount of plastic stuff.

And I really do not understand why is that - it's not that big of a deal, really. It's my pet peeve, too, I got lot of annoyances to name, but I won't, because it's of no use whatsoever, anyway.

sanke1 said,
Why do these PC cases have to look like transformers love child? When will the designers get a clue?

Because such case designs pander to idiots who throw temper tantrums because Windows 8 lack aero glass effect and butcher their install of Windows by tweaking registry settings based on half baked rumours from village idiots on overclocking forums.

Mr Nom Nom's said,

Because such case designs pander to idiots who throw temper tantrums because Windows 8 lack aero glass effect and butcher their install of Windows by tweaking registry settings based on half baked rumours from village idiots on overclocking forums.


Please leave here.

Phouchg said,

On that note, when will everybody get a clue that ATX, already tweaked to nonsensical proportions, is a transformers love child and haphazard mess of random cabling all over the place?

BTX was supposed to be the successor but not much love went there.

Phouchg said,
When people will stop buying them.

On that note, when will everybody get a clue that ATX, already tweaked to nonsensical proportions, is a transformers love child and haphazard mess of random cabling all over the place?

I'm not sure I follow why it appears bad case design is being attributed to the ATX form factor. Anyway, there are many SFF Mini-ITX cases that support full size graphic cards. I expect this form factor to take off next year with the Intel Skylake architecture when DDR4 makes 32GB in a 2 slot system quite doable.

In my post above: ATX was not designed with airflow, good looks (internally), customization and (added here) expandability in mind. Back in the days computers were business tools and home accessories. It has changed radically in the last 10 years.
So gradually things were added and tweaked to accomodate new features, dozens of new connectors, slots and headers for components that couldn't be imagined back then - wireless adapters with multiple antennae right in the way of the rest of the wiring, increasingly large graphics cards, SSDs that in whole 4 years haven't found their proper mounting place to be, big fat USB 3.0 cable, liquid cooling of all kinds, even CPU cooling that sometimes blocks RAM slots, occasional eSATA and fan-controllers that still use flimsy Molex 4-pin, multiple angled SATA connectors, M2 - put in the worst possible place, I might add -, larger dimensions, high-power components and wiring, faux-modular (let's be frank - all of them are faux-modular, because modular means something else... the name just stuck), tool-less installation (the biggest gimmick of them all, I might add), while trying to maintain easy repairability, looks and proper airflow. Yes, the things and possibilities are all there, but it's all directionless, chaotic, almost random... rather each designer pulls the blanket towards himself and forgets about the rest.

Unfortunately the way it's all going seems to be custom-design everything. I actually like what Apple has done with Mac Pro. Its problem, however, is that it's... well, custom-everything and locked-down to the last bolt. Same with most notebooks, tablets and phones - custom designed boards and components, custom everything, no interoperability of any kind. In name of what exactly?