TechSpot: Synology DiskStation DS1512+ NAS Review

Synology made significant upgrades to its high-end small and medium business product range last year, adding the 5-bay DS1511+ and 12-bay DS2411+ to counter the competition's products in the sub-$1,000 to $2,000 range. Despite being nearly a year old and as expensive as ever at $800 and $2,000 (that's without storage drives), the DS1511+ and DS2411+ are still very solid and relevant in today's market.

Both are still quite sound in terms of technical specifications -- unless you need USB 3.0, which is rapidly becoming a standard feature for NAS devices. As such, Synology has upgraded the 5-bay DS1511+ with the latest USB standard and it's taken the opportunity to polish some other specs too.

Known as the DS1512+, the revamped 5-bay device boasts faster read and write speeds compared to its predecessor, and packs a dual core 2.13GHz Intel Atom D2700 (32nm Cedar Trail) processor, which should provide a little more oomph than the dated 1.8GHz Atom D525 (45nm Pineview).

These extras come at a reasonable $100 premium over last year's DS1511+, which should position the DS1512+ as a respectable contender in the current NAS market -- or so the spec sheets would have us believe. Let's take a closer look at the hardware and software (including the recently released DiskStation Manger 4.0) before we greet Synology's latest offering with our usual array of benchmarks.

Read: Synology DiskStation DS1512+ NAS Review
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I have the 1511+ and it's one of the best investments I've ever made. That being said, it does more than the average user needs. But it is "the Cadillac" of NAS systems.

Troll said,
I have the 1511+ and it's one of the best investments I've ever made. That being said, it does more than the average user needs. But it is "the Cadillac" of NAS systems.

If you need more than 4bay NAS for home use, you are not a home user. Probably in future when porn becomes 4k resolution.

sanke1 said,

If you need more than 4bay NAS for home use, you are not a home user. Probably in future when porn becomes 4k resolution.

What a crazy assumption. I know of plenty home users that require more than 4 drives. Do you know how big movies and games are these days?

I also agree. If you buy digital games and online movies, at an average of 8GB-12GB per game and 8GB-20GB per Full HD movies, space is used up fast.

swright said,

What a crazy assumption. I know of plenty home users that require more than 4 drives. Do you know how big movies and games are these days?


4 x 2Tb drives in raid 5 with 1 redundancy drive will give you around 5.5 GB usable space. I believe its plenty of space vs price trade off by having a NAS with 5 bays. Not to mention, you can put upto 4 tb drives and get double the storage.

The only problem is 4tb drives are available in enclosure packages and not as bare drives.

Also, more the drives, more the chances or probability of raid failure.

Sky is the limit when it comes to storage. But is it worth it for average person to buy 10 bay enclosure and fill them up with 1tb drive each? Or buy a 4 bay and fill it with 3 tb drives each? Bang for the buck is simply not there with higher bay count.

sanke1 said,

The only problem is 4tb drives are available in enclosure packages and not as bare drives.

They are available in Germany for a few weeks now, as bare drives. I didn't check other countries.

I got myself Qnap TS-412 for Rs. 26,000 ($510). On top of that, the Green drives from Seagate and WD don't play nice in these RAID environments.

Just wondering, aren't these NAS boxes are just rip-off for average consumers?

I also have a QNAP 459 Pro. Most of these NAS's are not targeted for the average consumer. If all you want is use them for storage, then they are too expensive. If you use all the features they provide, then I think it is worh it.
QNAP say used to say in the HDD compatibility list that eco and green drives are not recommended, or outright incompatible, as they often drop out of raid arrays.

Odom said,
I also have a QNAP 459 Pro. Most of these NAS's are not targeted for the average consumer. If all you want is use them for storage, then they are too expensive. If you use all the features they provide, then I think it is worh it.
QNAP say used to say in the HDD compatibility list that eco and green drives are not recommended, or outright incompatible, as they often drop out of raid arrays.

I purchased St2000DL003's as they were in Qnap compatibility chart. After 1 month of purchase, Qnap took them off the chart. Their support forum is flooded with issues. Felt like strangulating a cat.

Synology is slightly good when it comes to compatibility.