Teen sends 10,000 texts with no messaging plan

It's not uncommon for teenagers to have cell phones as it seems nearly everyone has one these days. When a loving parent gave his teenage daughter a cell phone he thought was doing the right thing.

His daughter managed to send 10,000 text messages and receive about the same amount in one billing cycle. Most of the text messages were sent during school hours which equates to about 300 per day during an 8 hour period.

"She went from A's and B's one semester to F's in two months," and after receiving a $4,756.25 cell phone bill the father took a hammer to his daughters phone and grounded her for the rest of the school year.

It's hard to say who is to blame here; the parents when setting up the phone account asked that text messaging be blocked. Its obvious that the block was never put in place but should have the parents been responsible to check that? Either way Verizon has agreed to knock down the bill to a more reasonable level but the final amount has not been disclosed.

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Teens are in a war on who can text the most and get the biggest bill ever. Parents need to monitor their teens especially if they have their own cell phones for un-necessary use of texts messaging and downloads. It's clear these teenagers could care less.

I like how the company can notify in various formats about being delinquent in paying a bill over $100, but won't lift a finger when your account goes over $500 in a month, let alone over $4,000. wtf?

The worst part of this is that text messages cost the network providers themselves next to nothing because of the way they're sent- they're "attached" to signals routinely sent between the phone and provider, so no extra signalling needed, but still they rip us off (see above)

and with that out of the way, how could the school miss that? I mean 300 texts per day...surely she would have been texting almost constantly in most lessons?

Verizon usually lets you backdate your TXTing plan to help save you money...you'd think they'd do that in this case to help keep her phone number active. They've always let me do that...

When I originally got my Blackberry last November, I thought I'd been signed up for the unlimited TXTing/picture messaging plan. Well, I apparently hadn't, and I was billed for about $30 in TXT charges. I called up, and they were happy to backdate it. They allowed me to upgrade my TXT'ing plan a couple years ago when I went over, too.

So, I don't understand why they wouldn't allow her to get a TXTing plan to keep her on as a customer. I'm guessing they didn't want to do this because they thought they were making more money off of her up front than what they could for a few years...sad.

my teen 2 weeks into the billin cycle


( Start Date: 03/27/09 - End Date: 04/26/09 )
Text Messages Whenever Messages Unlimited 5,430.0 Unlimited

Verizon is at fault here. The parents thought text-messaging was blocked. Anyway, why is it that teenage girls love to text message? I've had my phone since February of 2008 and I sent/received a total of 1500 text messages.

Anaron said,
Verizon is at fault here. The parents thought text-messaging was blocked. Anyway, why is it that teenage girls love to text message? I've had my phone since February of 2008 and I sent/received a total of 1500 text messages.


BUT wouldnt you think they would of saw her ALWAYS on her cell phone pressing buttons and thought texting?!... then wondered why she was able to do it?

Supposedly it was only at school, at least according to the article which how much of it can you trust? I highly doubt Verizon will charge them for it, but I don't think the daughter will be getting a cellphone any time soon.

I can't even get 100 texts in a month even if I try my hardest to waste them. Hearing someone's voice simply works better lol.

neufuse said,
BUT wouldnt you think they would of saw her ALWAYS on her cell phone pressing buttons and thought texting?!... then wondered why she was able to do it?

maybe they thought she was playing frozen bubble...

Why should the kids take any responsibility? Verizon will go after the parents to pay. There is absolutely no incentive for the kids to anything other then what they want to. These cell phone companies LOVE this type of behavior. It cost the cell phone companies absolutely NOTHING for text messaging. I really don't understand WHY in the hell people are putting up with paying for texting when there is no associated cost from ANYONE to send a text message.

Lol. I can't believe there are people defending Verizon! Who hasn't had some minute or text overages and just had them up the plan and pro-rate the charges? Anyone who has worked at for one of these companies knows that $4000 isn't worth the bad publicity. Its all about market share, and Verizon is losing ground.

Plus salesmen screw up all the time, its no big deal.

C++ said,
No, it isn't. The air-headed bitch who sent 10,000 text messages is to blame.

I disagree. Parents put the block and the company didnt do it. The company is the "bad guy".

starburst1980 said,
I disagree. Parents put the block and the company didnt do it. The company is the "bad guy".


Wrong, I work for a phone company. Do you know how many we get a month complaining they didnt want this or that? But didnt actually read the agreement or change anything?

If the childs brain dead enough to send 10,000 texts in a month and the parents are to stupid to realise my moneys on them not putting a block on it either but just blame the "big corporation"

Well, I don't know what to say but..
Here (Egypt) NO SINGLE TEEN use that sort of unlimited service (called "Khat" or "Line" ), they all use the service of rechargeable cards ("Kart" ), so you have for example 10$ credit, after it finish you can't talk or send SMS until you charge again using a recharge card you buy from shop or charge credit directly on-the-fly from special shops, and so on, so that that sort of disaster don't happen.

If they asked for text messages to be blocked, then text messages should've been blocked. My parents have AT&T and have their text messages blocked. I once tried to message them forgetting this, and they never got it.

And yes Alexo, perhaps it is a better idea to give teenagers pay-as-you-go service (what we call your "kart").

*shrugs* People are making a huge number of assumptions. But that was what the internet was designed for...making stupid ass comments on things that they don't have all the facts on. Ignore the parents, ignore Verizon. Lets focus on the one key thing in all of this.....10,000 fracking messages. Now I know that I can easily blow threw 30 in 10 minutes with a simple back and forth chat with someone. But 10,000? That girl needs therapy.

I can't begin to imagine what it was like for the parents to get a $5K phone bill, especially if they thought that they had a texting plan that, while not unlimited, was at least comprehensive. Talk about shock! Without debating the appropriateness of the volume of the rampant texting, I get particularly riled when parents are stuck with huge bills; I hear about this all the time because I work for the consumer advocacy website http://www.fixmycellbill.com, powered by a company called Validas, where we slash the average cell bill by 22 percent. People like the this family may not have been actively misled by their providers, but they were clearly unaware of the vulnerability of their cell plans to their kids' texting habits. I could go on and on about how shifty these cell companies can be in their attempts to make you overpay. I'll mention that at Validas, we stop them and have currently put over $5,000,000 back in the pockets of consumers. You can check out Validas's fixmycellbill.com in the national news media, most recently on Good Morning America at http://www.abcnews.go.com/GMA/story?id=6887412&page=1.

Good luck to everyone trying to cut your wireless expenses in this rough economy.

Dylan

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