Ten million Galaxy S phones sold, Nexus S overclocked

In July last year, Samsung boldly claimed it would sell 10 million Galaxy S phones, a claim met with skepticism from some given the wide range of Android handsets on the market.

Less than seven months later, the electronics maker has apparently met that target, announcing the achievement via Samsung Tomorrow. According to a handy map, also provided by Samsung Tomorrow, the bulk of Galaxy S units - four million, to be exact - were shifted in North America, while 2.5 million phones were sold in Europe and two million in Asia.

Samsung president and head of mobile communications business JK Shin marked the occasion with a lofty statement linking the success of the Galaxy S line with the company's 22-year ''heritage'' in the mobile industry.

''It is the realization of our concept of ‘the Smart Life’ - we wanted to makes users’ lives more convenient, more exciting, and more integrated. Today’s milestone shows that we have succeeded: 10 million Galaxy S users around the world are living the Smart Life,'' he said.

Yet with most Galaxy S users yet to receive an upgrade to Android 2.2 (Froyo) - despite the fact that Google's mobile OS has already moved on to version 2.3 (Gingerbread) - Samsung shouldn't go patting themselves on the back too heartily just yet. According to Samsung USA's official Twitter account, US users should expect a helping of Froyo ''as soon as possible'', which is essentially what the company has been saying for several months. The latest Gartner research, released last November, showed Samsung held around 17 per cent of the global mobile phone market, down from nearly 20 per cent the year before.

Meantime, the already-speedy Nexus S, also manufactured by Samsung, has been given a tidy overclock courtesy of a new kernel for rooted devices. The ''Nexus S Trinity Kernel'', put together by ''Team Whiskey'' over at the xda-developers forums, boosts the phone's processor from the stock 1GHz to a snappy 1.3GHz. With few Nexus S owners complaining about the phone's ability to handle most tasks at stock speeds, the hacked kernel is more of a ''because we could'' project, and may as usual void the user's warranty. It also disables the phone's Bluetooth capabilities, though a fix is in the works.

Image Credit: Samsung Electronics

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25 Comments

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Not sure where this info on 2.2 is coming from....

But even here in Australia we got froyo in Nov/Dec

And this is definitely the best phone I've had....****es on Failpple offerings IMO

Garak0410 said,
I am sure I am beating a dead horse here but we really need Froyo!

Root the damn phone...lots of FROYO roms out there. Rooting takes all of 2 seconds.

designgears said,
10 million people with crappy gps... that can't be good.
It's not like the iPhone 3Gs has a good GPS either

My HTC Magic had a much better GPS than my 3Gs (but I wouldn't go back to the Magic though...)

designgears said,
10 million people with crappy gps... that can't be good.

My GPS Works fine, this was fixed a long time ago!!

designgears said,
10 million people with crappy gps... that can't be good.

Get a clue dude. GPS was fixed a long time ago. Plus, all the diff ROMS you can add, it was fixed WAY before Samsung did.

It's sad they report more on their earnings and how many devices they pushed and just totally disregard the support for these devices. Samsung fails in my eyes. I already have Froyo on my Vibrant and love it. But it's still pathetic how slow Samsung is.

presence06 said,
It's sad they report more on their earnings and how many devices they pushed and just totally disregard the support for these devices. Samsung fails in my eyes. I already have Froyo on my Vibrant and love it. But it's still pathetic how slow Samsung is.

Depends if your looking as Samsung to continue to support your software? I know you should by default, but my attraction to Android was the after-market.

I am running a Gingerbread themed Froyo ROM with plenty of modifications, battery life improved, response improved all over the stock ROM!

^ there is already one on the market, not sure under what name.

The Galaxy S can also be clocked from 1 to 1.2 safely (depending on your qualifications of safe)

To be fair the phone is great, just usual Samsung and their poor investment in software.

I have sold various Samsung devices in the past, from printers, to TV's and the one thing they have always failed on is software, generally speaking the quality of the hardware and its implementation is very good just the software fails.

I use a rooted Galaxy S with custom ROM and the thing is really amazing, but there are still one or two flaws that I'd love to have sorted by a revised model.

One the handling of bluetooth, it won't accept a Wii controller like other Android devices do which is a real shame as I love my emulators.

The so called mini HDMI isn't really mini HDMI at all and Samsung have kept this quiet ever since a sneak peak in development that it may have it - while the onboard supports HDMI it doesn't support 5 pin HDMI which is what Micro USB offers so that makes a big flaw on that side of things.

However there is TV out via component which I am waiting to try out on my phone.

The ten million doesn't surprise me but could have easily been 15 had the software been resolved.,

Android supporting manufacturers really need to standardise on hardware offerings to enable the platform to work flawlessly / alternatively Android needs to support a larger array of hardware.

+! to Samsung from me on the phone front +0 on the Software!

If the Galaxy S had a physical slide out keyboard, I would have bought it. The next smart phone must have a physical keyboard (I have made a decision to go with Android again).

rwx said,
If the Galaxy S had a physical slide out keyboard, I would have bought it. The next smart phone must have a physical keyboard (I have made a decision to go with Android again).
+1
A physical keyboard is so much better than an on-screen keyboard.

Beaux said,
+1
A physical keyboard is so much better than an on-screen keyboard.

I would disagree, on my Desire i don't even need to be that accurate and 99% of the time it predicts what word i'm typing perfectly. I think pressing keys small enough to fit on a phone would slow me down a lot more than using a touch screen.

Beaux said,
+1
A physical keyboard is so much better than an on-screen keyboard.

It depends on the device. My Droid 1's physical keyboard sucks in comparision to the Android on screen one.

Beaux said,
+1
A physical keyboard is so much better than an on-screen keyboard.

Swype makes the need for a physical keyboard obsolete....

SGS FTW!

L1ke 20 N1njas said,
Superb news about the over-clocking. I was completely unaware that this sort of thing was even possible!

Me neither, makes me wonder what the mobile market will look like in 5 years? Will it be one of those markets where benchmarks n such are done much like the PC one

Beyon_Godlike said,

Me neither, makes me wonder what the mobile market will look like in 5 years? Will it be one of those markets where benchmarks n such are done much like the PC one

We're already there, Android phones use programs like ncore, linpack, quadrant to compare benchmarks. Pretty crazy when you think about it

Hollow.Droid said,

We're already there, Android phones use programs like ncore, linpack, quadrant to compare benchmarks. Pretty crazy when you think about it

The crazy thing is what people will do just for a better Quadrant score! The Data2SD scripts get a lot of reviews saying that they're buggy, slow, and will reduce the life of your SD card, yet a lot of people use them to get higher benchmark scores.

Personally I'm more interested in real life performance and don't even bother with benchmarks