Texas Instruments getting out of smartphone-tablet business?

Texas Instruments executives have made some statements that may indicate that the company could be ditching its smartphone and tablet processor business. The company makes chips based on designs from ARM and has been competing in that space with other companies such as NVIDIA, Qualcomm and others.

Reuters reports that during an investor meeting on Tuesday, Greg Delagi, TI's senior vice president for embedded processing, said that the company would be changing its focus on making chips for devices that are used in products like smartphones and tablets. Delagi stated, "We believe that opportunity is less attractive as we go forward."

Instead, TI will try to expand its business and offer embedded chips for products such as cars. The company indicated that it will continue to support its current smartphone and wireless customers.

Texas Instruments has already announced that its products would be used in tablets that would run on Windows RT, the ARM-based operating system from Microsoft. TI demoed an unnamed tablet running on its hardware in June during Computex.

The story points out that TI has seen a lot of competition for smartphone and tablet chips. Not only does it have to deal with NVIDIA and Qualcomm's products, companies like Apple and Samsung are choosing to design their own mobile chips.

Source: Reuters | Image via The Verge

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11 Comments

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too bad for galaxy nexus owner or any TI omap future products like nexus Q and Kindle fire...

very bad news in general for consumer in general since less competition mean its going to be less choice

eilegz said,
too bad for galaxy nexus owner or any TI omap future products like nexus Q and Kindle fire...

very bad news in general for consumer in general since less competition mean its going to be less choice

Consumers don't give a **** about who makes a bit of a circuit board in their phone. They care about the colour, the games, and **** like that.

Nashy said,

Consumers don't give a **** about who makes a bit of a circuit board in their phone. They care about the colour, the games, and **** like that.

Competition in the manufacturing scene though means that the cheapest but most capable processors are used and thus less cost to customers..ideally.

Well, I suppose there's more money to be made charging $100+ for TI-84 calculators.

Fun fact, the reason they still sell the crusty old TI-84(and get away for still charging that much) is because anything more powerful is generally considered a full fledged computing device, and can't be used on standardized tests such as the SAT exam.

Laslow said,
Well, I suppose there's more money to be made charging $100+ for TI-84 calculators.

Fun fact, the reason they still sell the crusty old TI-84(and get away for still charging that much) is because anything more powerful is generally considered a full fledged computing device, and can't be used on standardized tests such as the SAT exam.

A) The TI-84+ is only a few years old (but I'll give you that it has crusty old hardware powering it)
B) You are also paying for a fair bit of advanced math software
C) $100 is still too damned much
D) Loved playing and making games (and distributing them) for the 83+

Laslow said,
Well, I suppose there's more money to be made charging $100+ for TI-84 calculators.

The Educational Technology Division is a marketing exercise. It brings in only 4% of TI's revenues -- but perhaps 99% of its brand recognition.

Laslow said,
Well, I suppose there's more money to be made charging $100+ for TI-84 calculators.

Fun fact, the reason they still sell the crusty old TI-84(and get away for still charging that much) is because anything more powerful is generally considered a full fledged computing device, and can't be used on standardized tests such as the SAT exam.

It's funny that I could get a $.99 app that does exactly what I need it to do on my iPhone... such as graphing, matrices, etc. But I'm not allowed to use my phone. I have to use a $100 calculator that is less powerful than my phone.

That's what you call a monopoly on calculators isnt it? lol I mean there's other calculators out there but every single school uses TI-83/84 and all the problems on books show you steps using a TI.

MidTxWRX said,

It's funny that I could get a $.99 app that does exactly what I need it to do on my iPhone... such as graphing, matrices, etc. But I'm not allowed to use my phone. I have to use a $100 calculator that is less powerful than my phone.

That's what you call a monopoly on calculators isnt it? lol I mean there's other calculators out there but every single school uses TI-83/84 and all the problems on books show you steps using a TI.

No. It's called people will cheat when they can, and cheating on a smart phone is easy. On a calculator, not so much.

TomJones said,

The Educational Technology Division is a marketing exercise. It brings in only 4% of TI's revenues -- but perhaps 99% of its brand recognition.


Makes sense. I figure most of their other stuff is low-level, or embedded components, which would give them no visibility as a brand.