Editorial

The current benefits of Xbox One

Microsoft’s new Xbox One doesn’t fit the “gaming console” description most gamers and technology enthusiasts are probably familiar with.

When Microsoft revealed the Xbox One in May, there was a heavy emphasis on television capabilities of the device. This inevitably met with the disdain of gaming-focused forums and websites, but it’s one of the best aspects of the console for those looking for an all-around entertainment device. Luckily, the gaming features haven’t suffered.

The Xbox One has a long road ahead of it, as does Sony’s PlayStation 4. Looking forward, there will surely be substantial improvements made to both consoles, and the lineups of games and apps will only get better with time as well. But for early adopters, there’s still a lot to like about the Xbox One. Here are some of the current benefits of the console that make it an easy recommendation for people with the cash to spare that are looking for an all-in-one entertainment device to pair with their cable or satellite set-top boxes.

TV integration

Microsoft’s decision to integrate television with the Xbox One was scoffed at by many gaming-oriented websites, but in practice it’s hard to see many reasons why anyone with a cable or satellite set-top box would take issue with the feature.

When first setting up the console, users are presented with a pain-free way to integrate the Xbox One with subscription television services. Simply plug in the HDMI output from your set-top box, select your provider and the bundled Kinect sensor can control your TV browsing. Equally fantastic is the ability to control your TV via your voice with Kinect, making the sensor a hands-free remote.

Of course, there are drawbacks. At the moment, there’s no way to control a set-top box’s stored DVR media through Xbox One; DVR capabilities are available for live content (such as pausing and rewinding), but recorded content can’t be manged. Additionally, the integration hasn’t launched in most markets – right now it’s mainly a U.S. feature. And while the solution is great for those who subscribe to TV services, it’s not perfect for cable-cutters: There’s no way to input an antenna for over-the-air signals, and Microsoft doesn’t offer any local channels through internet protocol TV. That’s unlikely to change anytime soon (or perhaps ever), given the U.S. television industry’s staunch opposition to IPTV that doesn’t require a subscription.

Overall, however, the TV integration is undoubtedly a cool feature – one that isn’t without drawbacks, but it’s going to serve most people well.

Quality games lineup

One of the strangest misconceptions about the Xbox One is that it doesn’t have good games. When looking at the aggregate scores of exclusive launch games for both the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One, it’s impossible to say they’re not, at the very least, on equal footing. In fact, exclusive Xbox One games are currently getting slightly better overall scores than PlayStation 4 games. The differences are negligible, however, so owners of either console will surely have something to play.

“Forza 5” and “Dead Rising 3” are standout Xbox One exclusive games, and while “Ryse” won’t win any game of the year awards, it’s a decent game on its own merits. “Killer Instinct” is also fun, and the base game is free to all Xbox One owners.

Microsoft already has a stacked lineup for the future as well. Next year should see the release of major exclusives such as the next Halo game, “Quantum Break,” “Titanfall” (which is exclusive to Microsoft’s Xbox 360 for previous-generation consoles; it will also be available on PC), “Sunset Overdrive,” “Kinect Sports Rivals,” “Project: Spark” and more.

On top of that, the overwhelming majority of third-party games are going to be released for both consoles.

For the more casual-minded, Microsoft also has the free “Xbox Fitness” training game. The game uses Kinect to monitor a user’s technique and heart rate, which goes well beyond what typical fitness videos provide. There are several free add-ons to the game, and more are available for purchase. It may not be an exciting exclusive for most gamers, but it bolsters Microsoft’s goal of making Xbox One a true all-in-one entertainment device.

Gamers who don’t care about the other entertainment features of Xbox One will find something to love. The PlayStation 4 may be more single-minded in its focus on games, but it’s by no means an afterthought on Microsoft’s new console. Neither console will struggle for quality exclusives, and to suggest either will suffer from a lack of good games in the future seems downright absurd, given the support both companies have from developers.

Apps lineup

Microsoft launched the Xbox One with about 20 apps in the U.S., many of which are also available in other markets.

On top of the expected Netflix and Hulu Plus apps, the NFL, ESPN, YouTube, Skype, Vudu, and iHeartRadio all had apps ready for the Xbox One’s launch on Nov. 22. Given that the Xbox 360 took years to slowly fill out its app lineup, it’s a great start for Microsoft’s new console.

Many apps should be on their way in the coming months because the Xbox One runs a modified version of the Windows 8 core, making development relatively easy. That may be both a blessing and a curse in the long run if apps aren’t modified to best use a TV screen. The Skype app for Xbox One, for instance, appears to be a nearly a direct port of its Windows 8 app. That makes it great in terms of features, but it doesn’t really lend itself well to a TV screen at the moment.

It’s still not clear how many developers will jump on the Xbox One bandwagon, but it’s almost certain the console will feature far more apps than the Xbox 360 has. Microsoft will have to push for more support, but that shouldn’t be a problem given the ease of porting apps from Windows 8. And unlike Windows 8, the Xbox One isn’t in dire need of an app ecosystem – the core focuses of the console are clearly gaming and TV, so there’s less of a constant demand from tech pundits for a vibrant app ecosystem.

Simple interface

While the Xbox 360’s latest dashboard took some liberties with Microsoft’s Metro interface, the Xbox One is Metro to the core. Gone is the abundance of ads found on the Xbox 360, as are several sections that cluttered the interface. Instead, users are able to pin what they want to their own home screens, and the most recent apps are available when users first sign in. Similarly, the disc currently in the console is displayed on the main page, as is a link to all the apps and games installed on the console.

Users can customize the appearance of the home screen, much like Windows Phone, by selecting their own colors. It’s not a major benefit, but it will surely please anyone tired of the green Xbox color scheme.

Multitasking is fantastic, and pressing the Xbox button on a controller quickly becomes a mesmerizing experience while watching TV or playing a game. While Microsoft touted snapping apps, that feature isn’t quite as useful as previously indicated. Apps such as Skype lack the capability entirely when gaming, and many simply aren’t very useful at the moment. Still, who can complain when you can watch TV and play a game on the same screen at once?

The interface is equally great for the OneGuide, which aggregates app content and TV listings in the same area. The guide can also be navigated with Kinect voice controls, though a media remote is sorely missing at the moment.

It all just works

Perhaps the biggest advantage the Xbox One has going forward is it all seems to mesh perfectly.

Microsoft executives have been fond of saying the Xbox One “just works” – and it mostly does. The implementation of multitasking through the console’s operating systems makes switching between TV and gaming a breeze, and the app catalog is already fairly robust for a new console. There simply isn’t a device that competes with the Xbox One right now; it took console gaming and evolved it, even if it’s not a revolution.

Some of the coolest features of the console are actually simple ease-of-access improvements. Instantly recognizing users makes signing in to different profiles easy, and not having to bother programming a universal remote when Kinect automatically determines the correct codes based on the brand is about as painless as can be.

There’s a long way to go before the Xbox One gets to where the Xbox 360 in terms of content, but the foundation for a successful lifetime is already in place. It may not be a “must-buy” device yet, but it’s getting there.

Neowin's full Xbox One review is scheduled for Wednesday. A look at the drawbacks of the Xbox One will be published later this week.

Images via Microsoft

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Buying a new Win7 PC. This thing sux, as does Win8! I can play more games with a PC, and can do more TV with a TV tuner card "free on Win 7". In all aspects Xbone sux.

We are having a few problems with the VUDU app. My wife will be watching something and my daughter will walk into the room. The Xbox One says, "Hello Rebekah", and instantly vudu loses its authentication.

Even if both users have the login information saved, usually you have to go through the picking the show process all over again. The other day, my wife told my daughter to hide her face several times.

PS4 for me at least initially. I'm a bit concerned at how Microsoft seems to arbitrarily perma-banning people from xbox live (that guy who got one early because of a shipping error for example) and the rumours that they have been monitoring private Skype calls on XBL is concerning. In addition it is likely that the new CEO might sell off the xbox business unit bringing uncertainty to the platforms future. They might also try and implement the restrictions they talked about at E3 in a future compulsory update before you can connect to XBL.

I also believe that it is not a wise idea to try and be a jack of all and a master of none with this TV/Gaming hybrid platform which is very US centric right now.

The new PS4 sitting underneath my telly isn't without its issues but their are a lot less of them compared to getting XBONE'd by Microsoft.

RossDundas said,
PS4 for me at least initially. I'm a bit concerned at how Microsoft seems to arbitrarily perma-banning people from xbox live (that guy who got one early because of a shipping error for example) and the rumours that they have been monitoring private Skype calls on XBL is concerning. In addition it is likely that the new CEO might sell off the xbox business unit bringing uncertainty to the platforms future. They might also try and implement the restrictions they talked about at E3 in a future compulsory update before you can connect to XBL.

I also believe that it is not a wise idea to try and be a jack of all and a master of none with this TV/Gaming hybrid platform which is very US centric right now.

The new PS4 sitting underneath my telly isn't without its issues but their are a lot less of them compared to getting XBONE'd by Microsoft.


The person who signed on early wasn't permanently banned, he was just banned until the console launched because the updates weren't final (Microsoft didn't want negative representations based on something that wasn't finished, I'd imagine). As for the Skype monitoring, I highly, highly doubt that's accurate.

Xbox isn't likely to be spun off by the next CEO because of its integration within Microsoft, but it's always possible. Restrictions will almost certainly not be implemented as it would create a backlash unlike anything the technology industry's ever seen.

On the topic of TV, however, you're absolutely correct: It's very much a U.S. benefit at the moment. I expect that will change over time, but it may be a slow change based on regulations from European countries. That's a shame, because the TV experience is downright awesome.

You'll be perfectly fine with your PS4 -- either console is great for the next generation.

I am actually loving the console.. and I have been a PC gamer for years. I was hesitant to go with BF4 because I didn't like how BF3 felt on 360, but BF4 is awesome so far on Xbox One, minus the bugs of course Also, just the fact that I can Skype with my brother, watch Tv, while playing BF4 is a big bonus for me. One thing they pulled before launch was the ability to snap Skype.... I hope they bring that back soon. Otherwise, I am loving the console. I was watching TV the other day while I was cooking in my kitchen and yelling to flip channels during commercials... can't beat that!
Also headset, that is one thing left they need to release. I'm fine paying for adapter as long as it works with any 3rd party headset... Need to be able to control game volume + voice like before on 360.

But does it pass the mom test? I'm interested in its successes outside of the gaming community. Please cover this in your full review.

Xbox Fitness is incredible. I've been using it for the past few days and it might be the most impressive and revolutionary thing on Xbox One. Seriously Xbox Fitness is for fitness videos what iPod/iTunes were for music. The tracking, feedback, and achievements work great. It even detects the floor exercises properly. The heart rate monitor through the Kinect is really cool too.

My opinion:
Pros:
1. Xbox games are definitely better at least for now
2. apps have better potential on xbox dashboard because its windows 8 based.
3. Controller is slightly better on xbox ( played with both dualshock 4 and XB1 controllers)
4. Kinect integration and cool features like voice commands, gestures and related games.

Cons:
1. $100 higher price tag which they can fix later by reducing price or subsidizing through cable providers.
2. Limited availability and Basic TV integration, would have been nice if they did more even though they can always fix it programmatically by firmwares

trojan_market said,
2. Limited availability and Basic TV integration, would have been nice if they did more even though they can always fix it programmatically by firmwares

Agreed. I would have prefered OneGuide support at launch, and I know what it takes for my provider to make the guide, so I'm in no way going to suggest that's easy.

and the biggest difference today:
a network that doesn't suck. PSN is clearly decades behind XBL as sony has no idea how to manage a large software project unlike MSFT.

not to mention, we will soon see some of the cloud computing aspects of Microsoft and their Azure juggernaut push gaming beyond what sony could achieve as it would have to start building their own cloud from scratch of pay a hefty bill to amazon to host it for them.

neonspark said,
PSN is clearly decades behind XBL as sony has no idea how to manage a large software project unlike MSFT.

Decades... wow, flare for the dramatics much? A decade ago, consoles hardly even had online functionality.

Caleo said,
....

True, but MS has been charging for XBL for a decade now and pouring those resources back into the network.

Sony offered a free, here you go, this is PSN network and didn't put any resources into its evolution, so yes.

Being that technology time is accelerated by Moore's law, it's really more than a decade behind.

I'm sure Amazon or MS will take their money, once they realize the economies of scale are against them in building an entire network from scratch.

deadonthefloor said,

I'm sure Amazon or MS will take their money, once they realize the economies of scale are against them in building an entire network from scratch.

I've been saying this for ages. Sony needs to pass off the network stuff to a company that can do it properly. That's the way PSN will become a strong network.

Tha Bloo Monkee said,
I love how my comment defending PSN was deleted but the anti-PSN comments continue to flourish and are not deleted.
Stay classy, Neowin.

Per Neowin rules, personal attacks towards other members are not tolerated.

Tha Bloo Monkee said,
I love how my comment defending PSN was deleted but the anti-PSN comments continue to flourish and are not deleted.
Stay classy, Neowin.

Difference is the comments you call "anti-psn" are no such thing. They're just an honest opinion being stated. I missed your comments on the subject but stating "stay class, Neowin" says a lot about your attitude.

One of the strangest misconceptions about the Xbox One is that it doesn't have good games.

It's no misconception that the xbox one has very little to nothing worth the (high) cost of the console when it comes to games. It's a pretty obvious fact. The same goes for its also recently released competition.

--

Also, i don't think i'd put the (still ugly) metro style of the UI as a plus.

Spicoli said,
I'd hardly consider either console high cost.

Really? let's look at the one. First comes the $500 price tag of the one itself, then the cost of atleast 1 game(add $60), and then the practically mandatory $60 tax to access 95% of the consoles features. Bringing the grand total of entry upto a minimum of $620. That's hardly what i'd consider 'low cost'.

Blackhearted said,

It's no misconception that the xbox one has very little to nothing worth the (high) cost of the console when it comes to games. It's a pretty obvious fact. The same goes for its also recently released competition.

--

Also, i don't think i'd put the (still ugly) metro style of the UI as a plus.

While i will agree that right now the consoles arent worth it because of the low selection of games, i do think that in the later days it will be much more so. Titanfall, halo etc etc.

subjective, because allot of people think its not that bad, or at least better then the ps4.

Spicoli said,
Cheaper than an iPhone and much cheaper than a gaming PC. I suppose it's expensive compared to a case of beer.

iPhone's an irrelevant comparison, and maybe you should search gaming PCs for the cost of an Xbox One; you can easily get something more powerful for that price, and you're not locked down to one digital platform that arguably puts on the least generous sales this side of Apple. You also get to play the best games too. To quote Yahtzee Croshaw, "you wanna play the best games, you buy a PC, or at a pinch, borrow a PS2 from a time traveller. The best reason to buy a next-gen console would be if you're stuck in an overloaded elevator and the only way to get it to move is to subtract a substantial amount of weight from your wallet."

Spicoli said,
Yea, okay. My work system with a dirt basic graphics cost more than an Xbox. I suppose if you're playing Angry Birds it would be okay.

Look into building your own. A reasonable AMD cpu + mobo would set you back $200ish (or less), plus 8GB of ram $60, case/psu about $100, basing it on $600, that leaves you $240 for a hard drive and video card - plenty of room for a reasonable gaming rig (with more graphical power than a x1/ps4).

Caleo said,
.....

and then you have to run a multitasking OS on top that is not performance optimized for gaming, unlike the hyper-V implementation fine tuned by David Cutler himself which task switches between a dedicated gaming OS and a modified Windows 8 in another VM.

Edited by deadonthefloor, Dec 4 2013, 1:53am :

MightyJordan said,

iPhone's an irrelevant comparison, and maybe you should search gaming PCs for the cost of an Xbox One; you can easily get something more powerful for that price, and you're not locked down to one digital platform that arguably puts on the least generous sales this side of Apple. You also get to play the best games too. To quote Yahtzee Croshaw, "you wanna play the best games, you buy a PC, or at a pinch, borrow a PS2 from a time traveller. The best reason to buy a next-gen console would be if you're stuck in an overloaded elevator and the only way to get it to move is to subtract a substantial amount of weight from your wallet."

it's not irrelevant, it's a very good comparison. it will last you AT LEAST 6-8 years, unlike many other tech products, runs the latest and greatest games, has the best only multiplayer services and costs just 500? That's insane value.

Jarrichvdv said,

it's not irrelevant, it's a very good comparison. it will last you AT LEAST 6-8 years, unlike many other tech products, runs the latest and greatest games, has the best only multiplayer services and costs just 500? That's insane value.

An iPhone lasting 6-8 years? Good luck trying to have someone stick with the same iPhone for 6-8 years when Apple cut off any software updates to it after 2-4. Let's take the original iPhone for example, as that's the only that's been out at least 6 years now. It lacks a few vital smartphone features (such as MMS), and it also lacks Game Center, Apple's own online gaming service, part of what you claim to be "the best only multiplayer services". Also, the latest and greatest games are on iOS? I can't take you seriously after that. Oh, and "just 500"? That's not "insane value", that's a bloody ripoff. Smartphones have been getting cheaper over the years and yet Apple keep raising their prices. How can you seriously justify paying £549 for an iPhone 5S when a Nexus 5 costs nearly half that at £299? Now THAT is what I'd call "insane value", considering everything else around it costs about £500.

MightyJordan said,

An iPhone lasting 6-8 years? Good luck trying to have someone stick with the same iPhone for 6-8 years when Apple cut off any software updates to it after 2-4.

Can't be sure, but isn;t he stating the console will last that long, not the iPhone? At least, i hope that's what he means!

MikeChipshop said,

Can't be sure, but isn;t he stating the console will last that long, not the iPhone? At least, i hope that's what he means!

The way he's worded it, it definitely sounds like he's talking about the iPhone. I hope he didn't mean that either.

Jarrichvdv said,

it's not irrelevant, it's a very good comparison. it will last you AT LEAST 6-8 years, unlike many other tech products, runs the latest and greatest games, has the best only multiplayer services and costs just 500? That's insane value.

It's not just $500. It's $500 plus the cost of Gold. Some savvy shoppers might get Gold for around $40, others will pay $60. That is at least another $240-360. So you're looking at a total of at least $740 and going up to $860. I know for a fact that I could build a PC with an i5, 8GB Ram, 250GB SSD, Blu-ray, able to play BF4 on ultra, all with quality parts for $850.

MikeChipshop said,

Can't be sure, but isn;t he stating the console will last that long, not the iPhone? At least, i hope that's what he means!


Yea he completely misunderstood me

MightyJordan said,

The way he's worded it, it definitely sounds like he's talking about the iPhone. I hope he didn't mean that either.

Talking about the Xbox One, not the iPhone.

Some issues to work though though as being reported online. At the risk of sounding like an Microsoft apologist, just typical first gen issues that I am sure will be addressed soon. MS already made good on the broken drive/damaged case issue so I am sure a fix for the others are coming soon.

Overall, I like my X1 and use it every day. Normally to watch netflix/movies/music now since I have no games for it yet. Use the voice features all the time as well.

Spicoli said,
What were the issues?

Some consoles, the DVD drive had issues. Some consoles were scratched/dented as well. Then there have been reports of it being sluggish. There is a recent post in the forums about it. Just normal issues really.

On the DVR content you can still use XBOX One to stop/play/pause/ff/rw etc... via Kinect or controller once you've started to play it. Yes, you can't currently use XBOX One to get into your DVR content menu and press play, but once you've done that part from your cable provider's remote the XO can take over. I'm hoping it is just a matter of time for them to work in the extra IR signals and logic across the different cable boxes.

scorp508 said,
On the DVR content you can still use XBOX One to stop/play/pause/ff/rw etc... via Kinect or controller once you've started to play it. Yes, you can't currently use XBOX One to get into your DVR content menu and press play, but once you've done that part from your cable provider's remote the XO can take over. I'm hoping it is just a matter of time for them to work in the extra IR signals and logic across the different cable boxes.

That's what I meant by live content, but I'll edit it to put the pause and rewind in parentheses.

I find it easier just to grab the cable box remote when accessing the cable box DVR or PPV features. The better enhancement would be to allow the Xbox to be the DVR and play PPV from the cable company directly. Then you could do stuff like pull up recorded programs by name. Being able to pause/rewind/whatever by voice during playback is nice.

scorp508 said,
Yep, I'd love that. I really wish the Xbox One had cable card + native DVR functionality.

I have a feeling that MS is hoping that the cable companies would make DVR apps for XBOX ONE. If AT&T U-verse was able to allow their subscribers to use Xbox 360 as another cable box, then accessing the DVR shouldn't be an issue.

RommelS said,
U-verse was able to allow their subscribers to use Xbox 360

Support ends for this feature at the end of the year.

it really was a half baked solution. The over the top solution is where we're headed. apps apps apps.

deadonthefloor said,

Support ends for this feature at the end of the year.

it really was a half baked solution. The over the top solution is where we're headed. apps apps apps.

I am aware of that since we received the notification as well. What is the half baked solution - MS implementation of their TV integration or U-verse?

RommelS said,
.....

The MS developed xbox360 Mediaroom client.
It required the application to be installed physically by disc. That's why my IPTV operator never offered it.

In Canada, TELUS had trials of the client, but eventually went with the app platform that was introduced when the dash changed from blades to the skewed tile design.

deadonthefloor said,

The MS developed xbox360 Mediaroom client.
It required the application to be installed physically by disc. That's why my IPTV operator never offered it.

In Canada, TELUS had trials of the client, but eventually went with the app platform that was introduced when the dash changed from blades to the skewed tile design.

I don't think that should be an issue since U-verse did the same thing. My Xbox become my second box, and I was able to see the same menu system that's in my DVR system.

They already have a DVR app. It's called Windows Media Center. However, they don't want it on the "One" because they don't make money with it. They would rather rent and sell you music and video content. It would take all of about 1 minute to port the 360 WMC app to the "One".

Great if you live in the US but looses the further away you get from America. TV is US only, lots of countries don't yet get Netflix so for those people it's simply a gaming console.....

Depicus said,
Great if you live in the US but looses the further away you get from America. TV is US only, lots of countries don't yet get Netflix so for those people it's simply a gaming console.....

Darn, U.S. is at fault again! Why?! Why?!

Microsoft has said on numerous occasions that they want to bring All of Xbox Live's services to every market with the Xbox One, just not at launch. We'll have to see if they live up to that.

Good point.
Out of 13 (or so) launch markets, the TV integration is only supported in the USA.
That's a fairly sizeable letdown for remaining consumers.

There's an unexplainable failure behind this mess since available time cannot be invoked to explain this legendary inability to launch stuff globally at Microsoft.

We can just all hope the company will do whatever it can to fix the mess.

RommelS said,

Darn, U.S. is at fault again! Why?! Why?!

No don't think it has anything to do with the US, more a decision made by Microsoft to get the console to market before it had support for global markets. So just a comment on the lack of benefits for customers outside the US, nothing more nothing less.

It's not unexplainable at all. You have to setup deals with all the local television systems for listing data. You probably also want to test against all their hardware. Then there's the mixing of 50hz and 60hz content which doesn't have a good solution except getting all the game developers to support 50hz which is going to take a while.

Depicus said,
Great if you live in the US but looses the further away you get from America. TV is US only, lots of countries don't yet get Netflix so for those people it's simply a gaming console.....

People must stop blaming Microsoft for lack of services in (insert country here).

Depending on the country you live in, there is often a ton of regulations, restrictions, licensing issues, and other factors that are beyond Microsoft's control.

Going back to PlaysforSurev2(Zune) and Media Center in 2004, Microsoft started fighting for access to programming information, providing guide services, licensing content for use, etc.

In some countries they cannot legally offer even the guide to TV shows, in other countries these are solely controlled by a couple of corporate interests that will not cooperate with Microsoft, and again on and on.

So if you country doesn't get feature XYZ, ask yourself, why.

Then decide if it is something you should complain to your government about, or is it something you should complain to the corporate interests that are locking out the feature.

Microsoft likes to make money and they wouldn't purposely close themselves off to any market unless they were forced to do so.

It has been noted multiple times that Microsoft has tried to get the TV data released. Unlike the US all those different EU providers keep a tight reign on the info. I have forgotten why but, I remember it was a stupid reason they were blocking Microsoft from accessing the data. So go yell at the providers about the channel grid. As for the other services not related to Microsoft (e.g Netflix) yell at them and especially EU for some of it's archaic protections that have in place that is slowing Netflix from being released over Europe. Of course if you live in the UK and the Nordic countries you have Netflix so you could move there

It is not possible to use voice commands with Xbox 360 with a Danish account, which is totally acceptable. However It is not even possible to use engelish voice commands with a Danish account, which is totally unacceptable.

Depicus said,

No don't think it has anything to do with the US, more a decision made by Microsoft to get the console to market before it had support for global markets. So just a comment on the lack of benefits for customers outside the US, nothing more nothing less.

Depicus, I am only kidding. However, the issue lies with localization. I'm sure MS wanted to bring the TV integration to everyone, but sometimes, even if you have planned it or scheduled it, and such, but the other party is not ready, it can come half baked.

Now MS, made the decision to launch the console as is because once everything is squared away, it can be initiated via an update. It is probably a hard decision for MS as well since they need to compete with PS4.

Look at it this way. By the time the TV integration comes to your country, we have beta tested the feature for all of you. Granted, there will still be an internal test conducted, but at least you will not experience the issues that we are having.

Mobius Enigma said,

People must stop blaming Microsoft for lack of services in (insert country here).


Who do we blame then ?

I'm sorry but it's Microsoft duty to make sure that what they sell is worth the price. The XBox One is 100$ more than PS4 in Canada too. So i expect pristine TV integration here too.

LaP said,

Who do we blame then ?.

Did you even read the replies above you? Its been explained, quite clearly I think, why Microsoft couldn't launch full TV support elsewhere at launch.

Also lets not forget that Microsoft lost a ton of development time redeveloping large chunks of the console's OS to appease a bunch of internet whiners complaining they needed to connect to the internet.

TCLN Ryster said,

Did you even read the replies above you? Its been explained, quite clearly I think, why Microsoft couldn't launch full TV support elsewhere at launch.

I read it, I think it's rubbish but I read it. These is only one reasonable explanation and that is that the console was launched before it should have been. Now that's not a bad thing, the 360 benefited hugely from being first to market, but when the author of this article explains the current benefits then she/he must expect people to reply with reasons why it currently doesn't have the benefits for those outside the US.

Us Brits cannot watch Hulu either or NFL so that isn't really a benefit to us either.

LaP said,

Who do we blame then?

Your tv networks and your government. TV guide listings should be in the public domain, not trade secrets.

rfirth said,
Your tv networks and your government. TV guide listings should be in the public domain, not trade secrets.

Once a curated DB reaches the web that has the same accuracy as the cable provider's native guides (like WiFi with DataSense), then it will be possible.

deadonthefloor said,

Once a curated DB reaches the web that has the same accuracy as the cable provider's native guides (like WiFi with DataSense), then it will be possible.

Right, but that's difficult if the information is, for instance, copyrighted.

TV is not US-only, what the heck are you talking about? It will be supported here in Belgium, too. (Got this information for a belgian Xbox Product manager, as I'm a member of the Xbox Elite Team there)

LaP said,

Who do we blame then ?

I'm sorry but it's Microsoft duty to make sure that what they sell is worth the price. The XBox One is 100$ more than PS4 in Canada too. So i expect pristine TV integration here too.

Whoever restricts, regulations or licenses the features you are complain you cannot get.

The extra 100$ isn't to be a TV remote, it is for a 3D motion tracking system with video integration and voice control in games.

Additionally, when Microsoft is 'able', you will get TV features integrated, especially if people like YOU complain to your TV providers and ask them to help get Xbox integration enabled. (You need to take this seriously if you want the features.)

Depicus said,

I read it, I think it's rubbish but I read it. These is only one reasonable explanation and that is that the console was launched before it should have been. Now that's not a bad thing, the 360 benefited hugely from being first to market, but when the author of this article explains the current benefits then she/he must expect people to reply with reasons why it currently doesn't have the benefits for those outside the US.

Us Brits cannot watch Hulu either or NFL so that isn't really a benefit to us either.

You surely aren't also blaming Microsoft for NFL broadcast restrictions and Hulu content licensing restrictions?

Heck I live in an area where ABC's Win8 App isn't licensed for Live TV because of my cable provider, should I complain to Microsoft about it, do you think that would fix anything?

If I complain to my cable provider or ABC, I have a chance of getting that feature.

Get it.?

Mobius Enigma said,

You surely aren't also blaming Microsoft for NFL broadcast restrictions and Hulu content licensing restrictions?

Get it.?

I "Get it"... although I don't see anywhere in my post were I blame Microsoft for this. I clearly state these are of NO benefit to me or probably 96% of the population on this planet who cannot use them. I am fully aware it's not Microsofts fault but this article seeks to show the benefits of the Xbox One yet these things are of no benefit to people outside of the US. Do you "Get it" ?

Fine for the TV integration... But Bing & Voice integration... Kinect voice commands are not 100% supported outside of US.... And i am not talking local languages... Even if you take English speaking countries (You do have to deal with Accent/Dialects), its not fully supported... Its not even there for xbox360, so i don't think most of the features will be supported outside of US...

Depicus said,

I "Get it"... although I don't see anywhere in my post were I blame Microsoft for this. I clearly state these are of NO benefit to me or probably 96% of the population on this planet who cannot use them. I am fully aware it's not Microsofts fault but this article seeks to show the benefits of the Xbox One yet these things are of no benefit to people outside of the US. Do you "Get it" ?

So the only reason to buy an Xbox is to use it as a voice TV remote control?

Ok then...

Mobius Enigma said,

So the only reason to buy an Xbox is to use it as a voice TV remote control?

Ok then...

No the Xbox One is a games console so the main reason would be to play games.