The Daily Show tackles Google Glass 'Explorer' discrimination in San Fran

While Google Glass certainly offers a real world advantage in some areas - for example, in the customer service sector - one can argue that in other uses it's just plain annoying and intrusive. Take the United States for example; a country where your social media updates can get you fired on the spot, it doesn't take a rocket scientist to understand why some people have a problem with a "glasshole" filming them in a bar or restaurant without permission or knowledge of it happening.

The issue has been widely discussed, and with good reason. With that said, Jason Jones, an investigator for The Daily Show, looked into an emerging form of 'discrimination' that Google Glass "Explorers" in San Francisco must face.

Of course, the above video isn't a serious tackle of the issue, and is skewed in favor of those being 'victimized' on the street - "since when can't a grown man walk into a kids playground with a secret camera on his head" (I'm paraphrasing) - but you begin to see the problem here.

It appears there's still a long way to go for the acceptance of this sort of wearable device in public places - if you aren't being abused for filming complete strangers boozing it up, or being arrested for supposedly filming a movie in a theater, you might even find yourself banned from entering the premises of some businesses.

So, how do you feel about this technology? We've added a poll and are interested to hear your comments on this controversial issue.

Google Glass currently sells for $1500 in staggered availability, but is expected to launch to retail later in 2014 for around $600.

Poll

I think Google Glass is intrusive

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"so that I have access to everything on my cellphone"
"but you already have access to everything on your cellphone..."
"...via your cellphone"

There's nothing wrong with Google Glass at all, and if it were a Microsoft product you can almost guarantee that the result of this poll would be reversed.

It isn't 'discrimination' to not want gl***holes bothering you constantly.

I think this is the worst 'advancement' in technology in my lifetime.

The debate will get even more intense when/if there are more people that have Google Glass with prescription lens in them for vision. Unless they have a spare pair on them, they may not be easily able to just take them off in certain settings. Or the weirdos that may end up using Google Glass may claim the same condition as to why they can't be taken off.

Forget about the "playground with a hidden camera on his head," more interesting is "public restroom with a hidden camera on his/her head." Regrettably, society can't rely on people's good judgement to turn it off in inappropriate places or at inappropriate times.

I think wearing is OK when using Google glasses is the problem, it's a rude attitude when you are with other people, it's not polite simply said, as attending to whatever occupation when you're talking to someone is, and moreover putting your view on a picture or a video without the person's consent. Finally, IMO, it is fundamentally stupid within society. May be interesting and pertinent on a tour, bicycle riding, whatever sports when the user is alone. Period.

All they need is a small red led to let people know if it's filming or not, it's common practice in other equipment and would settle any argument. Then, of course, you'd probably get people wanting to make their own rom which disables it.

PsYcHoKiLLa said,
All they need is a small red led to let people know if it's filming or not, it's common practice in other equipment and would settle any argument. Then, of course, you'd probably get people wanting to make their own rom which disables it.

well you can turn off the LED with software trick.

While we all know that someday this kind of technology will basically be everywhere, on every person (more than likely), it's not there yet and the longer that point stays away, the better I'll feel. I don't have many pictures of myself throughout my lifetime: I have a picture of me on my wedding day, a picture of me on my state ID, and a picture of me on my debit card and that's pretty much it. Not even family of mine have pictures of me, there's nothing of me in my high school yearbooks, and so on.

Am I a privacy advocate? You're damned right I am.

But sooner or later this technology-creep (that's meant as a double entendre, think about it) will happen whether we like it or not. I mean, look what cell/smartphones have done for common courtesy in today's world.

They've effectively thrown it out the window: in public places, you're forced (more or less) to have to listen to someone rambling on about their jobs, marriages, lifestyles, drug habits, anything they choose to ramble on about with a cell/smartphone attached to the side of their head. And don't even get me started on people with Bluetooth headsets.

Every day I'm out and about around other people there will be at least 5 times when I have to deal with some idiotic fool as they're babbling on a cell/smartphone (VERY LOUDLY MORE OFTEN THAN NOT, of course) and disturbing people around them, or in a line someplace and trying to order food or beverages and they're delaying the customers behind them because the order taker can't figure out whether or not the person with the device is speaking to them or whoever, and many other situations just like this.

I was raised to be polite, to open doors for people, to say "ma'am" and "sir" and just generally be courteous so it's a part of me. I could be a complete tool like so many others, but I choose to be polite and courteous. But there are times when I'm really close to snapping and just laying into people - verbally, as physically doing something is more trouble than it's worth - to get them to shut the hell up and wait till they're in a place where such cell/smartphone calls would be more appropriate.

I have a cell/smartphone because my Wife has several medical issues and being able to receive calls from her doctors or to make them to call for help is a major thing for us - I don't have it for me as the priority. But if and when it does ring in a public place I'll answer it and say "I can't talk, will call you back in a few..." and make my way to an area where I can actually make use of it.

Is it really so hard to think that other people might have enough common sense to do the same?

The biggest problem with today's world: common decency and common courtesy just aren't anymore.

Think about it.

br0adband said,
While we all know that someday this kind of technology will basically be everywhere [...]

We have seen in the past innovations not make their way. I wouldn't be so affirmative.

I read somewhere that Apple were working on something that remotely would disable recording capabilities on your iphone in e.g. concert venues. Maybe there should be some sort of standard on this matter and not exclude it to concert venues but to bars, stores and so on?

Thing I don't get is... why bars? I take photos at pubs all the time, unless you're specifically talking about the toilets (seemingly the favourite place for women to take photos of each other on a night out) I don't see a problem with it. If people want to take covert photos or videos of other people now, there are already a plethora of options for them to do so, without making it so obvious as slapping it on their heads.

Yeah, I agree but there's a difference with people holding up their cell phone to make pictures, than one just looking around, recording or snapping photos with Glass. The person doesn't know if they are being recorded or photographed with Glass, unlike that with a cellphone.

Maybe there are already some glass perverts out there, I'd wager that those people would find a way to be perverts without glass though and the majority of glass users just use it as an extension of their phone. I mean, why would most people even want to take photos or videos of random people?

I think the biggest problem is perception.

So you're in a bar drinking with friends and make a comment about your work or a colleague while some stranger is recording it and possibly putting it up on a social media site, it comes around and the guy is fired for his comments to friends, outside the workplace. I do see a problem with this. This doesn't include those people who willingly complain about their work/boss/colleagues on their OWN social media sites though.

To be fair, this could quite easily happen without glass though, if you've had a drink and you're slightly intoxicated, chances that you'd even spot a person recording with a phone, and secondly take issue to it are reduced already...

I think some of the issues we bring up specifically about glass are real issues, but they're issues that have existed for some time with technology we already have. Putting the technology on your face is like putting it on a pedestal for everyone to see, that's the real problem. The same problem could easily be attributed to smart watches with cameras built in, mobile phones, go pros etc

Steven P. said,
Yeah, I agree but there's a difference with people holding up their cell phone to make pictures, than one just looking around, recording or snapping photos with Glass. The person doesn't know if they are being recorded or photographed with Glass, unlike that with a cellphone.

Many different ways available now to record someone that is more stealthy than glass or a cell phone.

Edited by techbeck, Jun 15 2014, 3:07pm :

techbeck said,

Many different ways available now to record someone that is more stealthy than glass or a cell phone.

I agree. I think the publics main problem with google glass is that it makes them face the fact that they don't have privacy in public areas.

Interesting topic but I think they hit the nail on the head for peoples biggest problem and that's, there is no indication of when you are being photographed, or recorded, which given the recent government surveillance revelations is kind of funny, but I guess people don't feel they can do anything about that, you can however do something about a person with glass right in front of you...

I'm not sure what the solution would be, they could add a recording light or indicator to the device but there would be an app or software to circumvent it no doubt.

maybe they should build a ' do not record' feature into glass, so that if you are wearing glass and select this option other glasses won't record you...so to save yourself from glass you need to now get glass :p

Google's biggest mistake is selling them for $1500, for the simple reason that it will make anyone wearing glass look like an elitist rich snob. Or maybe that's just the kind of person that would buy this contraption, I dunno.

I dunno, I feel like if everyone had one (or could afford one), that the whole concept wouldn't get so much bad press.

I don't see a reason that we shouldn't be able to use them and have them on at any place that would be currently socially acceptable to take a photo. Just because you're wearing it doesn't mean you're using it. It's like saying mobile phones shouldn't be taken in to bars and restaurants and such. In fact, I imagine it would be less annoying in some places like cinema (ha, like they'd let them in there!) because you wouldn't have to constantly hear phones going off, get blinded by the peoples phones in front of you etc.

It goes on your head because it's convenient to use. Some people think it looks ridiculous, but I don't think it looks much more crazy than having a small metal framework with two pieces of actual glass stuck on your face.

Seriously, okay I can understand walking with them on the street and all that (Even tho I wouldnt even like that) but going into bars and such with them should be banned.

I agree that the property owners or tenants should bar Google Glass from their establishment if the demand is high enough. I would like to be clear and say that government should have no say in the matter.