Third-generation Kindle is the top selling product in Amazon's history

Amazon Kindle

Amazon released its holiday sales figures and confirmed that the third-generation Kindle is now the best selling product in Amazon's history. Holiday sales propelled the eReader past the previous reigning champ, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. The WiFi and 3G version of the Kindle were the #1 and #2 sellers in the electronics categories, beating out the 8 GB iPod touch. The duo also topped the charts for the best-selling products site-wide on Amazon this holiday season. Christmas day was a banner day for the Kindle with the eReader boasting of a record number of activations, Buy Once, Read Everywhere app downloads and Kindle book purchases. Once folks fired up their brand new Kindle, they purchased The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, which was the #1 purchased and #1 gifted Amazon Kindle book this holiday season.

Unlike Amazon, Barnes and Noble has not released sales figures for its Nook Color and it will be interesting to see how the sales of the two devices compare. Though they are both eReaders, each device takes a different approach to the digital reading experience. The Kindle is an e-ink device that boasts of superb battery life and easy readability; while the Nook is an Android-based reader with an LCD display. The Nook Color moves beyond an eReader by including a web browser and its Android operating system lends itself to rooting and other modifications. The Kindle, on the other hand, is a dedicated eReader that does one thing and does it superbly. It really is a toss up between the two devices, they are both excellent and the preference of one over the other depends on your intended usage. 

Image Credit: Amazon.com

 

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I have an ipad(work) an iphone(work) and a kindle(mine). My iphone and kindle go everywhere with me. The ipad never leaves my desk. I have the kindle app on my phone for if i forget my kindle. I still havent figured out any reason work gave me an ipad. I still see it as just a bigger iphone.

That's what happens when you sell a quality product that people really want with a reasonable price... can't wait for the Kindle Color! lol

I can see how Kindle and the original monochrome Nook are more appealing to heavy readers with the eInk displays and awesome battery life. But I love the extra bit of entertainment value I get from my iPad. Ha!

I think ereaders are going to run book store out of business. I wouldn't even want a paperback book anymore. I mean...why?
Anyway, here in Chicago Barnes and Nobles is closing its North Michigan Avenue store near Water Tower Place. It is their biggest store in the city. They are selling EVERYTHING including the fixtures. EVERYTHING must go. I asked on of the employee what will happen to them. They will be spliting off to some of the smaller stores in the area.

I would also guess that eventually the Nook isgoing to be B&N and they will become a specialty store for books that are printed and everything else will be online. At this point, I don't see a need for a physical book store. Every book and be electronically done. All the cost could be considerably less.

I think even $5.00 for an electronic book is to much. Just think, they don't even need to print a copy first. So they just eliminated the need to kill trees, cut them down and make them into paper. No need to buy ink anymore. They may make one physical copy and the rest are all dgital copies of a single original. The extra copies are so easy to make from any PC. Just right click and copy and past 1M times and give each one its own digital signature. All that takes is time...no materials.

Which means for Amazon and B&N or any other bookstore, this money can be all profit. It like charging $25.00 for a movie disk or a music disk. The CD cost one penny to make. At 25.00 each if they sell 1M copies, that is 25M dollars right on the top.

Amazon is going to make a killin' of eBooks. Newspapers are next. Magazines too.
In fact, all paper products with an exception of those that require a physical signature can be digital produced. Even school books. Which could drive down books cost for any school.

But you know they have to make the money off it first.

TechieXP said,
I think ereaders are going to run book store out of business. I wouldn't even want a paperback book anymore. I mean...why?
Anyway, here in Chicago Barnes and Nobles is closing its North Michigan Avenue store near Water Tower Place. It is their biggest store in the city. They are selling EVERYTHING including the fixtures. EVERYTHING must go. I asked on of the employee what will happen to them. They will be spliting off to some of the smaller stores in the area.

I would also guess that eventually the Nook isgoing to be B&N and they will become a specialty store for books that are printed and everything else will be online. At this point, I don't see a need for a physical book store. Every book and be electronically done. All the cost could be considerably less.

I think even $5.00 for an electronic book is to much. Just think, they don't even need to print a copy first. So they just eliminated the need to kill trees, cut them down and make them into paper. No need to buy ink anymore. They may make one physical copy and the rest are all dgital copies of a single original. The extra copies are so easy to make from any PC. Just right click and copy and past 1M times and give each one its own digital signature. All that takes is time...no materials.

Which means for Amazon and B&N or any other bookstore, this money can be all profit. It like charging $25.00 for a movie disk or a music disk. The CD cost one penny to make. At 25.00 each if they sell 1M copies, that is 25M dollars right on the top.

Amazon is going to make a killin' of eBooks. Newspapers are next. Magazines too.
In fact, all paper products with an exception of those that require a physical signature can be digital produced. Even school books. Which could drive down books cost for any school.

But you know they have to make the money off it first.

Our Boarders store closed this year, was the only book store in our area that was a real book store...

but you seriously think it will drive down costs of school books? Just last year, the Criminology books at our university here cost less as hardback then as a digital copy.... their excuse? "we have to put more money into protecting the digital copy".... excuses excuses... like someone cant scan or copy the printed book? an example was one crim book was $225 hardback... $310 digital.... figure that one out

neufuse said,

Our Boarders store closed this year, was the only book store in our area that was a real book store...

but you seriously think it will drive down costs of school books? Just last year, the Criminology books at our university here cost less as hardback then as a digital copy.... their excuse? "we have to put more money into protecting the digital copy".... excuses excuses... like someone cant scan or copy the printed book? an example was one crim book was $225 hardback... $310 digital.... figure that one out

Just criminal isn't it. . .

TechieXP said,
I think ereaders are going to run book store out of business. I wouldn't even want a paperback book anymore. I mean...why?
Anyway, here in Chicago Barnes and Nobles is closing its North Michigan Avenue store near Water Tower Place. It is their biggest store in the city. They are selling EVERYTHING including the fixtures. EVERYTHING must go. I asked on of the employee what will happen to them. They will be spliting off to some of the smaller stores in the area.

I would also guess that eventually the Nook isgoing to be B&N and they will become a specialty store for books that are printed and everything else will be online. At this point, I don't see a need for a physical book store. Every book and be electronically done. All the cost could be considerably less.

I think even $5.00 for an electronic book is to much. Just think, they don't even need to print a copy first. So they just eliminated the need to kill trees, cut them down and make them into paper. No need to buy ink anymore. They may make one physical copy and the rest are all dgital copies of a single original. The extra copies are so easy to make from any PC. Just right click and copy and past 1M times and give each one its own digital signature. All that takes is time...no materials.

Which means for Amazon and B&N or any other bookstore, this money can be all profit. It like charging $25.00 for a movie disk or a music disk. The CD cost one penny to make. At 25.00 each if they sell 1M copies, that is 25M dollars right on the top.

Amazon is going to make a killin' of eBooks. Newspapers are next. Magazines too.
In fact, all paper products with an exception of those that require a physical signature can be digital produced. Even school books. Which could drive down books cost for any school.

But you know they have to make the money off it first.

Dude, I want a more paperless society as well, but only where it's feasible. Newspaper and magazines are more likely to switch to digital completely than actual books since the content in them gets outdated fast.

B&N is probably just downsizing like many companies are because you could contribute that to the economy still being slow. It would make sense to close specific locations that aren't doing so great. I know the last bookstore in my mall is closing down, but I doubt it's because of switching to digital; more ppl are being budget-conscious and going to discounted/used bookstores, libraries, and such. I've barely seen any people toting a digital ebook reader in one of the largest cities in America.

I agree that there needs to be cheaper prices for digital style books with the less physical aspect, but you still have to account for energy and servers and such that need to run the digital store, as well as actual authors or publishers demanding they still make the same amount as they have before.

I still think there will still need to be a couple of physical copies around each city, because it'd be devastating if some of our electronics fail, and we end up losing access to the info. we might need. All possibilities need to be considered regardless of their likelihood. But yeah, I do hope for a more paperless society in our near future, though I'm not into drastic changes to one extreme.

TechieXP said,
I think ereaders are going to run book store out of business. I wouldn't even want a paperback book anymore. I mean...why?

Why are CDs still selling?
Because people like to have the actual product in their hand?

TechieXP said,
So they just eliminated the need to kill trees, cut them down and make them into paper. No need to buy ink anymore.

Yeah, but have you seen how much paper is still used in offices around the world these days? While I understand having a ot more digital books around will reduce the number of trees cut down, it won't have a significant dent unless pretty much ALL books are digital.

would be nice if color eInk would come out to the public, I know they have some test screens that can do an ok amount of color, but eInk is defiantly better for you if you are a heavy reader, less straining to read... easier to read outside and uses a lot less power then LCD since it only refresh when needed instead of constantly

neufuse said,
would be nice if color eInk would come out to the public, I know they have some test screens that can do an ok amount of color, but eInk is defiantly better for you if you are a heavy reader, less straining to read... easier to read outside and uses a lot less power then LCD since it only refresh when needed instead of constantly

4096 colours at the moment... hopefully Amazon will hold off on colour eInk until it can replicates an actual colour print, otherwise they're just inviting negative comparisions with what LCD (etc.) are capable of.

I got one for Christmas and love it. Just reading Gutenberg books alone it will pay fir itself in gas savings alone driving to the library. Just hope Amazon adopts epub sooner or later but caliber dies a good job converting these days and the DRM is easy enough to break

You know you can just Google all of these via the Internet since they're public domain and therefore free. Why would anyone go to the library anymore unless you didn't own a computer?

I like the kindle. Even though you put out $140.00 to $250.00 dollars in the long run it will pay for itself in book cost. A paper back book cost in the neighbor of $19.99 to $29.95, whereas a kindle eBook is in the price range of $9.95 to $15.95 (the cost of new books, older books will be at a lesser price). The same goes for the Nook and Sony eReader.

A paperback book for $29.95? Non-fiction, I assume. I've never seen a fiction paperback over 10 bucks, unless it was a trade paperback which are larger in size than mass market editions.

COKid said,
A paperback book for $29.95? Non-fiction, I assume. I've never seen a fiction paperback over 10 bucks, unless it was a trade paperback which are larger in size than mass market editions.

oooops!, sorry meant hard back books (don't buy paper backs).

Pam14160 said,
. . . (the cost of new books, older books will be at a lesser price).

If they start releasing out of print books, I may think about getting one.
Until then, I prefer the smell of freshly printed real books.

Kindle 3 is pretty nice and petite enough to replace a book. E-ink displays are much easier to read than an iPad or any LCD tech that I've seen.

At a guess the kindle 4 will be touch screen (that'll reduce the size further) and the kindle 5 will include colour.

Yes, agreed. I won't buy any reader device with that much wasted space on an already outdated keyboard interface. They can add a touchscreen to the Kindle for a couple of dollars. It would save money, space, and be more intuitive to use.

imachip said,
At a guess the kindle 4 will be touch screen (that'll reduce the size further) and the kindle 5 will include colour.

Yeah? This is what really bugs me about technology.

OooOoOoOoo, we've made a slight improvement, let's release it now. Err, how about you make it a LOT better (IE, touch-screen AND colour) before releasing?

The iPhone and such have no reason to be on version 4 already. I mean, look at how long IE 6 stayed around.

When companies release a new version, it makes me think they are not releasing very good products for them to be replaced in a years time.

I'm impressed with this because all it does it books. Especially with a price that doesn't really reflect the fact it does one thing. Lots of readers in the world.

ccoltmanm said,
I'm impressed with this because all it does it books. Especially with a price that doesn't really reflect the fact it does one thing. Lots of readers in the world.

The Kindle 3 also plays mp3s, and contains a web browser, to access the internet. Granted it's not brilliant, and prone to the occasional crash, but you can use it.

This probably might change in 2011 with all the android tablet boom people might just buy an android tablet and install kindle app and not to mention android rocks.

Dark_ph0enix said,

The Kindle 3 also plays mp3s, and contains a web browser, to access the internet. Granted it's not brilliant, and prone to the occasional crash, but you can use it.


Please explain what you mean by the occasional crash. I have had mine since the first of September (have read eight books thus far), and as of yet have not experienced a crash.

Pam14160 said,

Please explain what you mean by the occasional crash. I have had mine since the first of September (have read eight books thus far), and as of yet have not experienced a crash.

I've had mine since the start of the month, and have so far clocked up eleven books on the Kindle. Absolutely love it (there's a review in the Members Review section / a few pages back in the News section). I haven't experienced any probs using it to read books, or when transferring content to it / downloading via the Kindle store. However, it has crashed twice, when browsing the internet. The first crash, I'm gonna put the blame on the Wi-Fi connection - it went off whilst I was downloading a book from my Dropbox, so that's fair enough.

The second time, however, it fully crashed (again, using the browser). Totally unresponsive, plugged it into the computer under both Windows 7 and Linux, and while it'd charge, it wouldn't recognise the device. Contacted Amazon, and they told me that the web browser will occasionally crash on certain sites, and that when / if it does, you need to perform a 'hard reset', by holding the power switch off, until the machine switches down, and restarts itself.

It hasn't really changed my opinion of the device - I still love it, and at the end of the day - the web browser is located under an 'experimental tab' for a reason, but it must be enough of a problem that Amazons help staff know how to fix it quickly.

ccoltmanm said,
I'm impressed with this because all it does it books. Especially with a price that doesn't really reflect the fact it does one thing. Lots of readers in the world.

This is why it's so popular. It's focus is on reading and not a do everything device that does half ass reading.

Dark_ph0enix said,

I've had mine since the start of the month, and have so far clocked up eleven books on the Kindle. Absolutely love it (there's a review in the Members Review section / a few pages back in the News section). I haven't experienced any probs using it to read books, or when transferring content to it / downloading via the Kindle store. However, it has crashed twice, when browsing the internet. The first crash, I'm gonna put the blame on the Wi-Fi connection - it went off whilst I was downloading a book from my Dropbox, so that's fair enough.

The second time, however, it fully crashed (again, using the browser). Totally unresponsive, plugged it into the computer under both Windows 7 and Linux, and while it'd charge, it wouldn't recognise the device. Contacted Amazon, and they told me that the web browser will occasionally crash on certain sites, and that when / if it does, you need to perform a 'hard reset', by holding the power switch off, until the machine switches down, and restarts itself.

It hasn't really changed my opinion of the device - I still love it, and at the end of the day - the web browser is located under an 'experimental tab' for a reason, but it must be enough of a problem that Amazons help staff know how to fix it quickly.

Fix it quickly? They simply had you reset the device by totally powering it off and back on. That isn't a fix. That should ahve been second nature. When a device acts up, turn it off/reset.

still1 said,
This probably might change in 2011 with all the android tablet boom people might just buy an android tablet and install kindle app and not to mention android rocks.

I disagree.
I think the price, e-ink display, and simplicity are the reasons for the Kindle's success. The opposite of Android tablets and the iPad.

TechieXP said,

Fix it quickly? They simply had you reset the device by totally powering it off and back on. That isn't a fix. That should ahve been second nature. When a device acts up, turn it off/reset.

TechieXP said,

Fix it quickly? They simply had you reset the device by totally powering it off and back on. That isn't a fix. That should ahve been second nature. When a device acts up, turn it off/reset.

Sorry - I missed a specific part there, reading it back. Switching it off and on again, won't reset the device. Holding the power button off for 5 - 10 seconds, won't fix it. You have to (at least in my instance) toggle the off switch for three seconds, until the power light flashed. Then stop, then toggle it for 'exactly 15 seconds', which triggered the reset. I tried doing it for 10 seconds - nothing. 15, and it worked.

ccoltmanm said,
I'm impressed with this because all it does it books. Especially with a price that doesn't really reflect the fact it does one thing. Lots of readers in the world.

Well there's also the 2-4 week battery life & free internet access to consider.