This Android phone has a battery almost twice the size of many flagships

As smartphones become ever more capable and packed full of technology, there's one thing that never really seems to improve: battery life. Most of us have become resigned to the daily routine of plugging in our phones overnight to ensure that they've got enough juice to last the next day. 

Philips attempted to work around this problem with the W6618, its Android handset which crammed in an incredible 5300mAh battery. However, aside from that headline-grabbing feature, the rest of its spec sheet was utterly dull, with a non-HD display, 1GB of RAM and just 4GB of storage. 

But we're much more excited about another Android handset, spotted by Phone Arena, which also dials it up on the battery front, but has a list of specs that's far more interesting. The THL 5000 features a 5000mAh battery, and a quoted standby time of up to 1,000 hours. 

Let's put those figures into some context. Many flagship-class devices have batteries with nowhere near that capacity - the Lumia 1020, with its mighty 41MP camera, for example, has only a 2000mAh battery, while even Nokia's giant 6-inch phablet, the Lumia 1520, makes do with just 3400mAh.

LG's new range-topper, the G3, comes with a 3000mAh battery, while the Samsung Galaxy S5 has 2800mAh. Even the premium Amazon Fire Phone's battery has just 2400mAh, and quoted standby time of up to 285 hours. 

To put it simply, then, this is a pretty big deal, especially when you look at what else the THL 5000 has to offer. Despite its huge battery, it has a pretty slim body that's just 8.9mm-thick, along with a 5-inch Full HD (1920x1080px) IPS LCD screen protected by Gorilla Glass 3. 

Under the hood, you'll get a 1.7GHz octa-core (yes, eight-core) MediaTek MT6592 CPU with a 700MHz Mali 450 GPU, paired with 2GB of RAM and 32GB of onboard storage. Around the back, there's a 13MP Sony Exmor camera, along with a 5MP selfie-cam up front.

You'll even get NFC, Bluetooth 4.0, FM radio, and other features such as double-tap-to-wake. Perhaps the one most important spec that's missing is 4G LTE connectivity, but HSDPA+ speeds of up to 42.2Mbps are supported. 

That may be an acceptable compromise given everything else that's on offer, including that spacious battery, and considering the price tag too. The device is not yet available for purchase, but PhoneArena claims that it is expected to go on sale for the equivalent of $299. However, the device looks set to remain exclusively available through the company's distribution network in China, so if you were hoping to grab the THL 5000 elsewhere in the world, you may be out of luck. 

Source: PhoneArena | images via THL 

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13 Comments

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I stopped reading when i saw the Processor specs. It's about 13 times the performance needed in a smartphone and completely offsets the advantages of a large battery.

Jazoray said,
I stopped reading when i saw the Processor specs. It's about 13 times the performance needed in a smartphone and completely offsets the advantages of a large battery.
I was just about to say something like that, with that processor it'll probably need that battery, just to get more than a day or 2's use

It's about damn time. This should be standard now. This is something I would certainly pay a little extra for (if that's how they charged for it) - I'd assume others would do the same because this is one of the most important parts to a phone now a days.

It disappoints me that this still hasn't become a thing yet. From a technical standpoint, I don't see why the following scenario couldn't work:

1) Two batteries in the phone, one containing the big "main" battery, and one containing a tiny 15 minute emergency battery.
2) Main battery keeps small emergency battery charged
3) Remove main battery, the phone will be kept switched on temporarily using the emergency battery.
4) Insert backup battery, voila 2-3 days of charge without having to turn your phone off, or cripple it in airplane more.

Bonus benefit, people travelling can keep as many batteries as they like charged, and swap between them when necessary. People can pack a week of phone charge into a bag and keep using their phone without fear of running out of juice.

Yet, here we are, where manufacturers are actually removing the ability to replace batteries.

@Majesticmerc, probably because such a thing would be used by 0.1% of users and the only problem you're solving is shutting down your phone for 2 minutes every 2-3 days.

Majesticmerc said,
It disappoints me that this still hasn't become a thing yet. From a technical standpoint, I don't see why the following scenario couldn't work:

1) Two batteries in the phone, one containing the big "main" battery, and one containing a tiny 15 minute emergency battery.
2) Main battery keeps small emergency battery charged
3) Remove main battery, the phone will be kept switched on temporarily using the emergency battery.
4) Insert backup battery, voila 2-3 days of charge without having to turn your phone off, or cripple it in airplane more.

Bonus benefit, people travelling can keep as many batteries as they like charged, and swap between them when necessary. People can pack a week of phone charge into a bag and keep using their phone without fear of running out of juice.

Yet, here we are, where manufacturers are actually removing the ability to replace batteries.

The problem with that is upgradability and how much extra batteries made specifically for your phone cost. You don't want to buy a load of batteries to use like you said only to have to buy a new set when you upgrade your device.

A better option is mobile chargers, they will recharge your batter without turning off and are universally compatible.

Majesticmerc said,
~snip~
One of the reasons I loved my old N95, swap out the battery, no need to worry about them dying if I was out all week