Tim Cook: Apple to open up APIs in the future

Tim Cook has just finished his interview at D11, the annual conference held by AllThingsD, which sees the biggest and brightest tech stars on stage being interviewed. Apple has been having a turbulent year, with a stock price that has tumbled from a $700 high and a sense of stagnancy within iOS, which desperately needs a redesign

MacRumors reports that Cook told the audience that Apple is planning on opening up APIs to developers, but doesn't want to risk a "bad experience" for the end user:

Always a fine line, or maybe not so fine. The customer pays us to make choices on their behalf. But you'll see us open up more.

This openness doesn't extend to Chat Heads (more info here), one of the headline features in the Facebook Home Android skin which was announced earlier this year. According to MacRumors, Apple will "allow third party apps to take over some iOS features," which hints strongly that users will be able to set their own default apps, such as Chrome in lieu of Safari. Tim Cook previously said that Apple has "no religious issue" with porting iOS apps to Android, and would if they considered it the best thing to do. 

These changes are expected to be implemented in iOS 7, which will launch at WWDC 2013 in June. 

Source: MacRumors | Image via AllThingsD

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This won't matter if installing Firefox would still be reported as being Safari. More API power, would also mean the OS will need true multi-tasking or opening the API wont even matter if the apps still is force to run in 50% of the RAM space.

Apple apps on Android? What for. We have plenty apps that are great and features too. Many of which are being stolen by Apple or ported by devs already. In fact iOS in many apps they are taking on the Android versions more now which shows we had the best stuff anyways.

I hope this also means that alternative browsers can either run their own rendering engines (instead of the built-in one) if they want but above all I hope it means that applications that are not Safari will also have the faster Javascript engine available to them. At the moment for example using Chrome instead of Safari means JS performance is halved unless you use the jailbreak tweak Nitrous that removes the blacklisting Apple has in place "for security concerns".

Another important thing would be the ability for apps to register themselves as able to open certain file types or as certain type of app. Now for example Dropbox offers a few options to open a file but some app might not be in that list because apparently it is mostly a manually built list of popular apps. This is totally ridiculous.

Now if they would just sell OSX for us to install on Non-Apple hardware, Microsoft might have some real competition and we can get a decent shake-up in the market to help liven things up.

Xyphus said,
Now if they would just sell OSX for us to install on Non-Apple hardware, Microsoft might have some real competition and we can get a decent shake-up in the market to help liven things up.

While I too would like to be able to run OS X (in a legal, supported fashion) on PC hardware of my own choosing, it's just not going to happen. Ever. If you want OS X, you get a Mac. And really, the only place Microsoft doesn't face real competition when it comes to the OS, is in low-price low-margin PCs (which is admittedly a huge segment).

It's not in Apple's interest to do so. They would have to support a vastly bigger set of hardware.

You can build a very good Mac Pro style machine if you pick the right parts for a Hackintosh, it will mostly work exactly like the real thing but requires a bit of extra effort when the OS gets updated (mostly onboard audio tends to break).

I already have two Macs (an old PPC iBook and a MacBook (Late 2009) and enjoy using them. I have much more powerful desktop machines running Windows and Linux. So, while I'm not lacking for OSX, it just would appeal to the tinkerer in me if I could get OSX (legally) up and running. Even if they offered it with a disclaimer stating that you were on your own for hardware and technical support, it would be a hoot getting OSX up and running on my desktops.

Yes, it will never happen. But one can daydream...

CSharp. said,

While I too would like to be able to run OS X (in a legal, supported fashion) on PC hardware of my own choosing, it's just not going to happen. Ever. If you want OS X, you get a Mac. And really, the only place Microsoft doesn't face real competition when it comes to the OS, is in low-price low-margin PCs (which is admittedly a huge segment).

One of the key things that made me drop iOS for a tablet was the crappy keyboard. iOS desperately needs things like swiftkey etc because it's painful using the default one (which can't be replaced currently).

I'm extremely sceptical they'll allow anything like that though..

No idea why this would require two posts instead of one. Apparently Apple has so little to report we need to add fodder and post double articles..

And in reality Cook ain't saying or committing to anything here. Although Apple needs the attention as tech wise and as far as innovation goes they are at least at a standstill. I'd even go as far as to say they are where Nokia was before the big drop happened, thinking you got it covered while the world passes you by and not even in denial yet..