Today is World IPv6 Day

Today is World IPv6 Day, the day where some of the major internet companies around the globe switch to IPv6 to test out the new protocol and to see how their network configurations fare. The internet is set to fully run out of IPv4 addresses very, very shortly, so World IPv6 Day is an easy way to test IPv6 connections with a huge test user base (the entire internet population) and evaluate the effects of the switch.

Popular internet sources such as Google, Facebook, Bing, YouTube, Yahoo and more have switched to using IPv6 before IPv4 to connect its users today, meaning both protocols will be in use. Despite this fact, around 0.05% of internet users will have problems connecting to websites on World IPv6 Day due to misconfigured home networks, according to Sierra Madre Patch. They mention that despite the low sounding figure, it actually equates to around 150,000 North Americans and more than a million people worldwide.

IPv6 has actually been around for more than a decade as engineers realized that IPv4 addresses will eventually come to a close, however companies have been slow to deploy proper IPv6 solutions as the situation hasn’t been particularly grave. Unlike IPv4, which only allows for around 4.3 billion addresses (232 to be specific), IPv6 supports 340 undecillion addresses (2128) for extreme flexibility – or around 50 octillion addresses per person. To accommodate this huge increase, IPv6 addresses are longer compared to IPv4 addresses and use hexadecimal characters; an example would be 2001:db8:1f70:999:de8:7648:6e8.

You will most likely find your favourite internet sources participating in World IPv6 Day fully functional today, however if you are not, the day will end at 23:59 UTC where the sites will switch back to the standard IPv4 configuration.

Are you already on IPv6? Let us know in the comments.

Image credit: worldipv6day.org

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Shaun. said,
No idea if my ISP supports it yet, Gonna do some googling to see if Sky have pulled their finger out yet.

Sky aren't but Easynet, who handle Sky's network, are.

Too many UK ISP's seem to be of the opinion that it isn't a problem for a few more years. They have enough IP addresses to add more people, but don't seem to think about people who need to access IPv6 resources.

This morning I did some tests with IPv6 only - I dissabled IPv4. Shame that some companies that have enabled IPv6 didn't do such a good job. Facebook has the CSS on an IPv4 only address so even if the http://www.facebook.com is IPv6 it looks rubbish unless you have IPv4 enabled too.

calimike said,
Test ip6v show my isp don't support ip6v. I've ip4v. where is ip5v?

Don't worry. Your ISP probably hasn't readied its network for IPv6 yet. Everything will work just fine in the meantime.

There is no IPv5.

Neobond said,
On a side note, BBC News is on IPv6 http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/
The BBC Sport site is still on IPv4 http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport/
Nice try BBC

There is a problem with BBC generally running IPv6 only. If you run dual stack or IPv4 only then there isn't an issue

Take BBC News. That uses resources from 4 other websites in the attempt I made:
http://www.bbc.co.uk has an IPv6 address

but the following four don't:
static.bbc.co.uk
news.bbcimg.co.uk
node1.bbcimg.co.uk
node2.bbcimg.co.uk

which means you get content, but no pictures or stylesheets. The BBC need to tweek a bit.

Can't wait to have few million IP addresses only for me
My idea: I give every single object in my house an IP address. Like my mouse, my radio, water boiler, ... and then I can take control over my house
Oh man I'm full of ideas with all those IP addresses

TrOjAn. said,
Can't wait to have few million IP addresses only for me
My idea: I give every single object in my house an IP address. Like my mouse, my radio, water boiler, ... and then I can take control over my house
Oh man I'm full of ideas with all those IP addresses

I got a free tunnel and a /48 subnet from sixxs.net, I can already give a unique ipv6 to each atom in my house, but i don't want to

(ipv6 /48 gives you 16bit for network (65536 total networks), and 64bit for host in each network (2^64 different hosts)

TrOjAn. said,
Can't wait to have few million IP addresses only for me
My idea: I give every single object in my house an IP address. Like my mouse, my radio, water boiler, ... and then I can take control over my house

Actually, to an extent that's the idea. Give everything an IP address, and everything becomes connectable, and then we can start doing some seriously cool stuff

Majesticmerc said,

Actually, to an extent that's the idea. Give everything an IP address, and everything becomes connectable, and then we can start doing some seriously cool stuff

and then we will need to do FridgeUpdate, WashingMachineUpdate, LampUpdate, HeaterUpdate, AirconditionUpdate, *Update once a month, otherwise we risk giving somebody else the control of our devices

Reverend Spam said,
How do i know if my router is IPv6 compatible?

Well did you go to any of the tests sites? Odds are your router can do it but it's a matter if it's already setup for 6to4 which isn't native IPv6 but it'll work for now. If it's not then you need to find out which model you have (?) and then see if it supports 3rd party firmwares which do have 6to4 options (as well as native IPv6).

I recognise the security, ease of use and speed benefits but IPv6 addresses are so damn ugly.

The colon ":" characters in IPv6 addresses conflct with URLs and port numbers so you have to enclose with square brackets like so
"https://[2001:db8:85a3:8d3:1319:8a2e:370:7348]:443"; - accesss https page using port 443
... yuck. Why on earth didn't they stick to full stops?

Hope people who have setup ipv6 on their networks remembered to correctly setup their Firewalls.

Unlike private Ipv4 addresses most SOHO routers dish out (e.g 192.168.x.x) IPv6 addresses tend to be internet reachable.

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