Toronto law firm files $1 billion lawsuit over Playstation Network attack

The pile on by customers and others due to the cyber attacks on Sony's Playstation Network continues. According to Gamasutra, a Toronto law firm has filed a lawsuit against Sony, asking for damages in excess of $1 billion as a result of the attack that exposed the personal info of tens of millions of Playstation Network users.

The law firm of McPhadden Samac Tuovi LLP said in its press release that it is also seeking for Sony to pay for credit monitoring and fraud protection services for its Playstation Network users for two years. The law firm is using Natasha Maksimovic, a 21 year old gamer from the town of Mississauga, as its plaintiff. Maksimovic writes in the press release, "If you can’t trust a huge multi-national corporation like Sony to protect your private information, who can you trust. It appears to me that Sony focuses more on protecting its games than its PlayStation users."

Sony has admitted that the cyber attacks, which caused the company to shut down the Playstation Network online services on April 20, accessed the personal info of over 70 million of its subscribers. Personal info has also been taken from a similar attack on the MMO servers of Sony Online Entertainment, which shut down its servers on Monday, along with a small number of old credit card and debit numbers from an old database. Sony has said repeatedly that there is no evidence that credit card info from its Playstation Network servers has been exposed.

On Sunday Sony pledged to restore some online services on the Playstation Network later this week, and has also announced plans to beef up its online security systems. It has also offered to compensate Playstation Network users with free content and free 30 day subscriptions to its premium Playstation Plus and Music Unlimited services.

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Cancel your credit cards, people. I don't know how it works where other people live but here in Australia you ring your bank, tell them your story, they cancel your card and issue you with a new one within a few days. What is so hard about that? You can still access your account you just might have to go into a bank (the horror), show some photo I.D. to withdraw money .That has been my experience in the past when I've had to cancel compromised cards. I can't imagine it is any more difficult in any other part of the world.

If you're worried about someone knowing your name, address and date of birth that information isn't difficult to find out about you anyway. You can find that out on someone's Facebook page or by stealing someones wallet. I think that this whole mess is going to result, for the most part, in a whole lot of nothing.

I guess I just can't get really worked up about this.

compl3x said,
Cancel your credit cards, people. I don't know how it works where other people live but here in Australia you ring your bank, tell them your story, they cancel your card and issue you with a new one within a few days. What is so hard about that? You can still access your account you just might have to go into a bank (the horror), show some photo I.D. to withdraw money .That has been my experience in the past when I've had to cancel compromised cards. I can't imagine it is any more difficult in any other part of the world.

If you're worried about someone knowing your name, address and date of birth that information isn't difficult to find out about you anyway. You can find that out on someone's Facebook page or by stealing someones wallet. I think that this whole mess is going to result, for the most part, in a whole lot of nothing.

I guess I just can't get really worked up about this.

The credit cards are just a drop. The real issue is individuals that now have all your information in one convenient location. With that information they steal your identity and begin taking out loans, credit cards and anything else out in your name. That is the whole point of forcing Sony to pay for fraud alert and credit monitoring. The credit card thing is a joke and easily fixed, the stolen identity is another and may not rear its ugly head for months, when it is too late.

compl3x said,
by stealing someones wallet. I think that this whole mess is going to result, for the most part, in a whole lot of nothing.

I guess I just can't get really worked up about this.


Last time I checked, someone in China can't steal my wallet. Thanks for playing though.

ahhell said,
Last time I checked, someone in China can't steal my wallet. Thanks for playing though.

Wallet no, but by stealing your identity, credit card info and everything else, they just stole everything worthwhile inside except for the pictures of your family. Unless you put those on Facebook, then they got that too.

ahhell said,

Last time I checked, someone in China can't steal my wallet. Thanks for playing though.


Clever. My point is most of the information that has been stolen from Sony is the kind of infomation everyone seems to be so willing to give out freely now anyway. Address, birthdate, age, location, schools you attended, places you worked etc.

If people are oh-so-concerned about this kind of stuff why is facebook so absurdly popular? Why do people so willingly hand over their info to be stored on a server somewhere in a foreign country?

So if you are affected by this how do you jump on this bandwagon then?

I could use 2 years of credit monitoring and fraud protection for free

I hope she wins. Sony is only offering fraud protection to US subscribers and to no one else. I think they should be paying for fraud protection to ANYONE who was subscribed, no matter what country.

"Natasha Maksimovic, a 21 year old gamer from the town of Mississauga".

How is a regional municipality with a population of just under 1 million a town? Mississauga is a city.

I hope Sony wins this case because only the lawyers would get the money, since it would be hard to divide up all that money to 70million users. And no real damage was done since all CC information is encrypted and the hacker doesn't have the security codes since Sony doesn't keep them.

Anyone that claims they have lost money are either lying or they fell for a scam somewhere else because whenever someone says they lost money from the breach, I always say "post location of where it happened", and they never do.

stablemist said,
I hope Sony wins this case because only the lawyers would get the money, since it would be hard to divide up all that money to 70million users. And no real damage was done since all CC information is encrypted and the hacker doesn't have the security codes since Sony doesn't keep them.

Anyone that claims they have lost money are either lying or they fell for a scam somewhere else because whenever someone says they lost money from the breach, I always say "post location of where it happened", and they never do.

The attorneys are just looking for money. 1 Billion + to 70 million people isn't much...I mean...the law firm would have to go out and find all the people...I don't want a law firm with my info, especially one in Canada...

stablemist said,
I hope Sony wins this case because only the lawyers would get the money, since it would be hard to divide up all that money to 70million users. And no real damage was done since all CC information is encrypted and the hacker doesn't have the security codes since Sony doesn't keep them.

Anyone that claims they have lost money are either lying or they fell for a scam somewhere else because whenever someone says they lost money from the breach, I always say "post location of where it happened", and they never do.

1 - Just because nothing has happen yet doesn't mean it wont. The whole reason to force Sony to pay for credit monitoring and reimbursement of loss if needed. 2 - How could someone possibly post how they were defrauded? If I get a phone call from my credit card company about some crazy purchases made in China, how would I post that?

stablemist said,
I hope Sony wins this case because only the lawyers would get the money, since it would be hard to divide up all that money to 70million users. And no real damage was done since all CC information is encrypted and the hacker doesn't have the security codes since Sony doesn't keep them.

Anyone that claims they have lost money are either lying or they fell for a scam somewhere else because whenever someone says they lost money from the breach, I always say "post location of where it happened", and they never do.

PS:

http://arstechnica.com/gaming/...t-card-fraud-blame-sony.ars

Anyone can say anything online. Don't believe what you read until you can actually see it. "Hey, My CC was on Sony's network, but somehow, I got $1,000 deposited into my account! It must be because of this breach... but someone put money on my account..."
You wouldn't believe that, but you will believe another person saying the opposite with no proof in your face? No reports have shown a statement showing anything from anyone's bank about fraudulent charges.

shakey said,

Anyone can say anything online. Don't believe what you read until you can actually see it. "Hey, My CC was on Sony's network, but somehow, I got $1,000 deposited into my account! It must be because of this breach... but someone put money on my account..."
You wouldn't believe that, but you will believe another person saying the opposite with no proof in your face? No reports have shown a statement showing anything from anyone's bank about fraudulent charges.

Yeah because it is common place to post pictures of peoples statements or bank account statements to appease the apologists. Yeah let me give you all the information to my accounts so I can prove to you I was defrauded, is that what you are really asking? Must be lonely all the way up Sony's A$$.

BrentMH said,

The attorneys are just looking for money. 1 Billion + to 70 million people isn't much...I mean...the law firm would have to go out and find all the people...I don't want a law firm with my info, especially one in Canada...

Whats the difference if the law firm is in Canada. Lawyers the world over all reign from HELL.

They can keep the money but I do like the credit monitoring and being on the hook if something happens to my CC or information.

Lets be realistic, most of those 70 million users likely had their personal information obtained via some e-mail they signed up for. Or unintentionally given it out online while filling out a form. Or When installing an application that requires you to uncheck an option to NOT send your information.

I mean, Sony's PS3 and PSN went unhacked for over 5 years. FIVE years! That's huge in the gaming industry considering how fast the 360 was hacked, as well as the Wii. Sony has already promised a free month of PS+, a free game download, and who knows what else. They are already showing that they want to make it up to us. If people can sue due to something outside of their control (Sony getting hacked), then what's to stop us from suing over...9/11? Or Those tornadoes that touched down a few days ago in the southern US?

...and as others have said, the lawyers are the only ones that would win if this case goes anywhere.

Elessar said,
I mean, Sony's PS3 and PSN went unhacked for over 5 years. FIVE years!

Uh, seriously? So you think that it's expected for companies to lose your personal information and, in some cases, credit card details?

The PS3's record for the console not getting fully cracked was somewhat impressive. The incredible lack of security on the PSN dev side after that point is reprehensible and thoroughly deserves a lawsuit such as this.

Elessar said,
Lets be realistic, most of those 70 million users likely had their personal information obtained via some e-mail they signed up for. Or unintentionally given it out online while filling out a form. Or When installing an application that requires you to uncheck an option to NOT send your information.

I mean, Sony's PS3 and PSN went unhacked for over 5 years. FIVE years! That's huge in the gaming industry considering how fast the 360 was hacked, as well as the Wii. Sony has already promised a free month of PS+, a free game download, and who knows what else. They are already showing that they want to make it up to us. If people can sue due to something outside of their control (Sony getting hacked), then what's to stop us from suing over...9/11? Or Those tornadoes that touched down a few days ago in the southern US?

...and as others have said, the lawyers are the only ones that would win if this case goes anywhere.

Err what? I don't remember XBOX Live being hacked and all of the customer's information being stolen, nor the Wii's system...

Do provide sources if I'm not accurate.

If you're arguing about game protection wise (meaning it wasn't hacked for mods) then you would be agreeing with the Plaintiff that Sony invested more in protecting the games than its customers (although you could argue that gamers aren't their customers at all, but that is another topic for another day).

Frazell Thomas said,

Err what? I don't remember XBOX Live being hacked and all of the customer's information being stolen, nor the Wii's system...

He is confused. We are all talking about PSN and he is talking about stuff from 6 months ago about the PS3 being hacked.

Elessar said,
Lets be realistic, most of those 70 million users likely had their personal information obtained via some e-mail they signed up for. Or unintentionally given it out online while filling out a form. Or When installing an application that requires you to uncheck an option to NOT send your information.

I mean, Sony's PS3 and PSN went unhacked for over 5 years. FIVE years! That's huge in the gaming industry considering how fast the 360 was hacked, as well as the Wii. Sony has already promised a free month of PS+, a free game download, and who knows what else. They are already showing that they want to make it up to us. If people can sue due to something outside of their control (Sony getting hacked), then what's to stop us from suing over...9/11? Or Those tornadoes that touched down a few days ago in the southern US?

...and as others have said, the lawyers are the only ones that would win if this case goes anywhere.

Fail Troll. We are talking about the PSN not the PS3 but nice try.

Rooster69 said,

Fail Troll. We are talking about the PSN not the PS3 but nice try.

I don't think he was trolling, having a contrary opinion to most other people on a story is not trolling. Fail accusation of trolling?

Anyway,the security of Sony's PSN might be pitiful but their legal department would be able to deal with any litigation that arises. I would much prefer to see an inquiry or official investigation which was available to the public so we could know exactly what went wrong. I want to know if Sony was indeed entirely incompetent, if they were the target of an incredibly sophisticated and organised hacking/criminal group, if it was an inside job or otherwise.

compl3x said,

I don't think he was trolling, having a contrary opinion to most other people on a story is not trolling. Fail accusation of trolling?


Having a different opinion is one thing, have a different opinion based on the wrong facts and posting it as fact is trolling. So Fail on Fail accusation of trolling.

Rooster69 said,

Having a different opinion is one thing, have a different opinion based on the wrong facts and posting it as fact is trolling. So Fail on Fail accusation of trolling.

No, that is ignorant. Ignorance ≠ trolling. I don't think he was trying to disrupt the conversation or draw a special amount of attention to himself. That is trolling.

"If you can't trust a huge multi-national corporation like Sony to protect your private information, who can you trust...."

If someone is that naive, I really do not know what to say to them. I was under the impression, that you never trust them.
I would never trust a multi-national corporation with my private information in the first place, though, I'm sure I do on more than one occasion, it doesn't keep me settled. =/

zappa859 said,

If someone is that naive, I really do not know what to say to them. I was under the impression, that you never trust them.
I would never trust a multi-national corporation with my private information in the first place, though, I'm sure I do on more than one occasion, it doesn't keep me settled. =/

I would disagree with you and side with the Plaintiff. It is natural to trust a larger organization with a long history more than a smaller organization. People make the assumption that the larger organization can afford to pay for the proper people to secure their infrastructure and that they government regulates them better due to their sheer size.

Assumptions can be inaccurate, of course, but I think this assumption is natural. It is why more people will buy from Newegg or Amazon than they would from FrazellOnline (just founded last week...) when buying expensive computer hardware...

I'm also sure you've given up your personal information more than you could count to large companies. Otherwise you're living in a dark cave with no phone, internet, utilities, etc... Just living off the land in the mountain side...

Frazell Thomas said,

I would disagree with you and side with the Plaintiff. It is natural to trust a larger organization with a long history more than a smaller organization. People make the assumption that the larger organization can afford to pay for the proper people to secure their infrastructure and that they government regulates them better due to their sheer size.

Assumptions can be inaccurate, of course, but I think this assumption is natural. It is why more people will buy from Newegg or Amazon than they would from FrazellOnline (just founded last week...) when buying expensive computer hardware...

I'm also sure you've given up your personal information more than you could count to large companies. Otherwise you're living in a dark cave with no phone, internet, utilities, etc... Just living off the land in the mountain side...

Well of course I have, as I mentioned it in the last sentence.
I just don't feel comfortable in doing so. I am under the assumption that yes, they would have the money and the means to secure their infrastructure for the amount of customers they have to appease to, but also, the sheer amount that they have, it is difficult to keep up with all of it, and if a breach of some sort happens, it is much harder to keep a larger amount of customers secure, than a smaller. Though, it works in both ways, as if they had a smaller amount of customers, the information would be quicker to grab.
Either way, I don't trust anyone but myself with my information. I am just more unsettled by a larger corporation having it, due to the fact they would have more means of hiding it if they "sold" it, released some of it, etc.

Let's see..... Lawyers will get ~ 300 million and the members will get a $10.00 coupon to buy Sony products. Lawyers 1, members 0.

streetw0lf said,
Let's see..... Lawyers will get ~ 300 million and the members will get a $10.00 coupon to buy Sony products. Lawyers 1, members 0.

Why do people always complain about this. I would love to get a $10 coupon!

streetw0lf said,
Let's see..... Lawyers will get ~ 300 million and the members will get a $10.00 coupon to buy Sony products. Lawyers 1, members 0.

So you got $10 coupon to buy Sony products for doing nothing.

Not the worst thing in the world.

streetw0lf said,
Let's see..... Lawyers will get ~ 300 million and the members will get a $10.00 coupon to buy Sony products. Lawyers 1, members 0.

And to get the coupon you will need to submit your personal details/bank account etc to their secure system... ohh wait...

NeoandGeo said,

Why do people always complain about this. I would love to get a $10 coupon!


Tell that to hundreds of employees at Sony who will lose their job and their financial source to feed their families just because of a greedy law firm. But hey, at least you'll be happy with $10.

theh0g said,

Tell that to hundreds of employees at Sony who will lose their job and their financial source to feed their families just because of a greedy law firm. But hey, at least you'll be happy with $10.

And then people will complain when Sony has to jack up all of their prices to make up for the loss...

theh0g said,

Tell that to hundreds of employees at Sony who will lose their job and their financial source to feed their families just because of a greedy law firm. But hey, at least you'll be happy with $10.

Good point. But the damage will already be done. Don't think some people refusing the $10 would save any jobs.

ZeroHour said,

And to get the coupon you will need to submit your personal details/bank account etc to their secure system... ohh wait...


BAZINGA!!!!!

DukeEsquire said,
So you got $10 coupon to buy Sony products for doing nothing.
Not the worst thing in the world.

From where do you think Sony will get extra ~ 300 million? Yep, from your pocket.

One thing to keep in mind, it's 70 million accounts, but people set up multiple to access PSN store in different regions, so it's not 70 million individual subscribers.

soniqstylz said,
One thing to keep in mind, it's 70 million accounts, but people set up multiple to access PSN store in different regions, so it's not 70 million individual subscribers.

I don't think that mitigates the severity of security breach.

Kainenable said,

I don't think that mitigates the severity of security breach.

And I don't think that it was the poster's intention to say that.

Amodin said,

And I don't think that it was the poster's intention to say that.


If he meant to say something else he should say it, and not make us infer his meaning.

soniqstylz said,
One thing to keep in mind, it's 70 million accounts, but people set up multiple to access PSN store in different regions, so it's not 70 million individual subscribers.

So 69.8 Million accounts then? - I mean seriously how many users do you actually think do what your saying. I bet its less than 200K probably even less than 10K users.