Toshiba announces 'Cell TV'

Toshiba unveiled a new line of TVs today that they are betting will be the premier choice for 2010. Their top of the line TV series dubbed the "Cell TV" is built on top of the Cell processor. The top tier model will include many features that will help to separate Toshiba from the pack.

The new cell TV is going to boast the ability to take any 2D content and turn it into 3D content on the fly. Toshiba claims that this will "deliver the ultimate 3D experience in 2010. The feature list for the "Cell TV" series includes:

  • Ability to convert 2D to 3D in real time
  • 480HZ (240 HZ to each eye when in 3D mode)
  • Super Resolution Technology (up-scaling imagery)
  • Net Super Resolution+ (compression noise cancelling)
  • Auto View (auto configures the screen to best viewing settings)
  • 1TB HDD for recording content from cable , Blu-ray (when possible) and any other video source
  • VOIP/Video phone capability
  • 802.11N built in
  • DLNA compatability
  • 9 million to 1 contrast ratio
  • Wireless HD
  • USB movie playback
  • Net TV channels

The "Cell TV" series boasts a lot of great technologies including the built in hard drive. The idea is that the TV will be able to record what ever content you want and because of its DLNA and 802.11n technologies built in, you will be able to share this content to any device. In essence, the "Cell TV" can act as a media hub for your household with the ability to share or access the information from nearly anywhere.

Toshiba also noted that these technologies will migrate to their other TV product lines but no other information was given; Pricing and availability were not announced.

Brad Sams, Managing Editor, contributed to this report



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27 Comments

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I really have to say that as much as others enjoy their 3D stuff I personally see it as just a big gimmick as it always has been in the past. I don't want to wear glasses to watch TV or movies :\

I just want a good TV, I do not want a bunch of extra stuff built into it that will soon become obsolete. I can add stuff like that on seperately and update when needed without buying a new TV every few years.

You can't add 3D to your current TV, so yeah. That's not something that can be "seperately and update when needed", it has to be built in.

But yeah, stuff becomes obsolete too quickly, hah. So I (and lots of others) know what you're saying.

not interested until it comes with super resolution ++PLUS...... this super resolution + and net resolution + is sooooooo last year.

No, considering NES mario does not have focus contrast etc. like real video does, which is how it makes the 3D picture up.

According to the list on the front page of their website Toshiba is a Tru2way licensee so hopefully it does.

TRU2WAY LICENSEES
ADB
Alticast
AMD
Broadcom
Cisco
Digeo
EchoStar
Funai
Intel
LG Electronics
Motorola
Pace
Panasonic
Samsung
Sony
Texas Instruments
Thomson
Toshiba

Anyone else skeptical about the 2D->3D stuff? How exactly is that going to work? Otherwise everything else is sweet. They might as well let you install a OS on it as well as it is basically a PC

DomZ said,
Anyone else skeptical about the 2D->3D stuff? How exactly is that going to work? Otherwise everything else is sweet. They might as well let you install a OS on it as well as it is basically a PC

1. I'm sure it's pretty similar to the "True3D" stuff they're using in movie theaters now... it can interpret depth based on contrast and focus and adjust those pixels for your eyes to actually look like depth. But that's just a guess.

2. I think installing an OS on it would be a mistake in this case... too many proprietary pieces that I'm sure they've worked very hard to integrate in together, and some Linux noobie that thinks Linux is the god of everything and can do no wrong would install it and flip out that none of the proprietary features worked anymore.

But that's just my two cents. =)

DomZ said,
Anyone else skeptical about the 2D->3D stuff? How exactly is that going to work?

I really doubt this will work properly aswell. There is no way for the TV to tell what objects are in front for example. Focus-based is impossible aswell. If there are, let's say, three layers: one out-of-focus, one in-focus and another out-of-focus in that order, how will it decide which one of the out-of-focuses is in front and how will it even be able to seperate them? Sorry, but I don't see this happening really...

I'm sure you'll be wearing glasses...

This is all hype. Don't expect algorithmic 2d-> 3d conversion to be anything but a cheesy novelty.

Awesome news as I am looking to buy something new in the near future... Does this now mean that the price of LED TV's will drop a bit?