Toshiba to launch three 3G HD DVD players in Sept/Oct

Toshiba, in continued efforts to promote the HD DVD format, will launch three third-generation HD DVD players for sale in the US soon. The mid-range HD-A30 will launch in September at a recommended retail price of US$399 while the entry-level HD-A3, priced at US$299, and high-end HD-A35, priced at US$499, will follow in October, according to a company press release.

The HD-A35 and HD-A30 both feature 1080p playback at 24 frames per second and support a two-way connection between the player and TV over HDMI, dubbed CE-Link by Toshiba. The HD-A3 supports 1080i only. The three models will be 5.95cm high which is approximately half the 10cm height of first and second generation models.

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News source: DigiTimes

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10 Comments

Dropping prices is a way to HELP win the "format war". Drop it another 100 bucks, and I might think about buying one.

jerzdawg said,
dont you think its people like you that cause the delay in making one format the standard?

Price has nothing to do with it; it's the studio support that may detemine who wins this war. With only one exclusive studio (Universal), it's not looking good for HD DVD.

Galley said,
Price has nothing to do with it; it's the studio support that may detemine who wins this war. With only one exclusive studio (Universal), it's not looking good for HD DVD.

That is such an ignorant statement. The main factor in who wins is the consumer. If the majority buy HD DVD over BD then the studios will have to support HD DVD or lose money.

stokhli said,

That is such an ignorant statement. The main factor in who wins is the consumer. If the majority buy HD DVD over BD then the studios will have to support HD DVD or lose money.

Actually, it does hold true to a certain extent. What good will a player do if there isn't support for titles from the studios? A studio could lose more money supporting a format that isn't as popular. But because companies are out to make money, I'd expect them to cater to either format. I think multiple formats are good for the consumer. Having a single format discourages competition and competition encourages better pricing for the consumer. If a gas station decides to lower their prices to generate more business while still making a profit do you expect the gas station a block away to keep their higher prices and lose business to the other station?

Sure, companies could lower prices for a player for a single format or the publisher/studio could lower prices of their titles to encourage people to buy it but they will draw the line at one time or another. That's why we have these things called "sales".

Also added to the line is "CE-Link" (HDMI™-CEC) connectivity which
offers the capability to communicate with and control another CE device in
a whole new way. For instance, using "CE-Link" with "One Touch Play"
consumers will be able to turn on a CEC capable HDTV and a Toshiba HD DVD
player, and start playing a movie, with a single touch of a button on the
player remote.

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