Toshiba to show 512GB solid-state drive at CES

Toshiba said Wednesday that it will showcase a 512GB solid-state drive at the Consumer Electronics Show next month and begin shipments in the second quarter of 2009.

To date, this would be one of the largest-capacity solid-state drives for use in laptops and come close to matching the size of mobile hard-disk drives.

Toshiba said it is releasing a broad family of "fast read/write SSDs" based on 43-nanometer Multi-Level Cell (MLC) NAND flash technology that will be showcased at CES. MLC technology allows solid-state drive makers to deliver higher capacity drives at lower prices.


Image Courtesy: cnet news

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You're comparing this to a 4MB/s USB drive?
These drives are data striped, have advanced controllers and about 64MB of cache. This stuff isn't free. There's also a premium due to Toshiba being the only one with a high performance 512GB and having spent so much on research & development.

If a 4 GB usb drive costs c. $10, this should only be in the order $1000 tops. What would concern me more is the lifetime, Guarantee, number or read / writes, and what happens when the the switches start failing. I'll stick with cheap and cheerful SATA HDD

boho said,
If a 4 GB usb drive costs c. $10, this should only be in the order $1000 tops. What would concern me more is the lifetime, Guarantee, number or read / writes, and what happens when the the switches start failing. I'll stick with cheap and cheerful SATA HDD

You're worried about read/writes with SSD? Haven't you read documentation on them? Your "cheerful" SATA HDD will die a dozen deaths before a SSD starts to go out. When an SSD "dies" (stop accepting new writes), you should be able to just copy your data off on to another device.

este said,
How reliable are these drives ? I would like to think the technology is well developed by now...

How RELIABLE are these drives??? I'd think that to some people, perhaps more than that whole "speed" thing, the main draw of these are the fact that the technology has been shown to be very reliable.

Your computer would be outdated by several generations and the device would start to change colors from old age before you'd lose data from them.

30GB is enough for me, already have one 500GB seagate 7200.11 and one 320GB 7200.9 so plenty of storage, now speed is what i want

The price of these drives are dropping like a feather at the moment. But the 120GB OCZ one would be the most appealling to me, if I were in a position to purchase.

This is great news, it should force down the cost of smaller drives and make these more main stream. Can't imagine how much it's gonna cost for a 512GB one though...!

I have an older 37GB Raptor (10K rpm) - SATAI I believe - in my rig atm. Will a 30gb SSD for ~$130 be a worthwhile replacement?

ootput said,
I have an older 37GB Raptor (10K rpm) - SATAI I believe - in my rig atm. Will a 30gb SSD for ~$130 be a worthwhile replacement?

Keep in mind some of the current MLC SSD drives have crazy slow writes.

This drive will have faster read and write than your Raptor. It'll also have faster seek. The spec where the raptor wins is random writes.

so the wrong thread

there are some usb card reader dongles that dont need power. but This discussion is on SSD's, not USB hubs or card readers

Woah, already... Next step = 1TB, then 2.... !!!!

It's already catching up to the traditional hard drives.

Yeah, if prices drop, hard drives will die for good. It's just a matter of time from now.

Since there is no "mechanical energy" needed for that kind of storage, does anyone know if it consumes less power? I heard that it was a hoax to say that it consumes less, but I don't understand why?

PsykX said,
I heard that it was a hoax to say that it consumes less, but I don't understand why?

It wasn't a hoax, just as with anything some brands are considerably better than others.
one of OCZ's drives was the first to really put the others in their place, with a native SATA controller it floored everything in performance and low power consumption.

Western Digital GreenPower (spinning conventional) has lower power consumption than most Flash SSDs. The thing that most people forget is that these are performance SSDs.

Conventional drives that use less power and don't make much noise are generally SLOW. These SSDs are roughly 4x faster, you can't compare. You should compare to a Raptor drive instead.

Edit: Also, in comparing oranges to oranges: http://www.gadgetvenue.com/1tb-laptop-drive-10152115/
Hitachi planned to announce a 1TB conventional laptop drive in 2011. That means currently the largest one is still 512GB. Same size as this Toshiba drive. SSDs have caught up already. Stop comparing these laptop drives to desktop drives.
If you want to compare apples to apples: http://gizmodo.com/352839/16tb-ssd-is-larg...-cant-afford-it
That's a 1.6GB Flash drive released in February 2008.

MLC used to mean slower read/write speeds but some MLCs are faster than Raptors today. SLCs are still faster but of-course more expensive too.

The newest Velocity Raptors aren't even as fast as some of the SSDs on this page Click here

Scirwode said,
I wonder if the price is the cost of an arm and a leg?

Scirwode

Add 1 lung and a kidney and you almost there.

Now imagine getting 4 of these in raid0

OCZ Vertex is probably the cheapest of the performance drives (with masses of onboard cache) so far. Their 256GB version will be $869 ($3.4 per GB), So you can probably except this drive to be about $1800.

Don't need an arm or a leg but I'll give you one for an organ.

Sacha said,
OCZ Vertex is probably the cheapest of the performance drives (with masses of onboard cache) so far. Their 256GB version will be $869 ($3.4 per GB), So you can probably except this drive to be about $1800.

Don't need an arm or a leg but I'll give you one for an organ.

Actually as the amount of GB's they stuff in, the price per each GB goes down so your estimates are probably a bit high. It's the same standard that applies to hard drives

"OCZ's recommended prices for the 30GB, 60GB, 120GB, and 250GB models are USD $129, $249, $469, and $869 respectively"
It is roughly linear with capacity, unlike conventional drives."
$1800 may be a bit high, but it's close. Maybe $1600. There is only a small discount for larger capacity due to them keeping the same amount of cache and so on.

Beastage said,


Now imagine getting 4 of these in raid0


Ummm.. excuse me! I don't think I want four hard drive in me, thanks. Unless the price is right... how much you payin?