Toshiba's Windows 8.1 3840x2160 resolution notebook launches next week

During CES 2014 in January, Toshiba showed off two upcoming Windows 8.1 notebooks that both had a screen resolution of 3840x2160, Today, the company announced that one of them will finally go on sale April 22nd in the U.S.

Today's press release says that the Toshiba Satellite P55t notebook (previously known as the P50t) will have a 15.6 inch Ultra HD TruBrite display that supports 282 PPI. Toshiba adds:

Each Ultra HD display is individually calibrated by Chroma Tune and is Technicolor Certified during production to realize natural color expression with an accurate color gamut to ensure true-to-life imagery. As a result, everything displayed on screen is reproduced according to the original intent and there are no mismatches when viewing photos or other imagery.

Inside the 4.8 pound Windows 8.1 notebook, Toshiba has put in a Intel fourth generation Core i7 processor, an AMD Radeon R9 M265X GPU with 2GB of video memory, and support for up to 16GB of RAM. There's also a 1TB hard drive 4 USB 3.0 ports and a built in Blu-Ray disc player.

There's no word on its battery life but we suspect that it doesn't last for long without a power cord due to it's 4K resolution. Pricing for the Toshiba Satellite P55t notebook will begin at $1,499.99.

Source: Toshiba press release | Image via Toshiba

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27 Comments

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You can get a ThinkPad W540 with a 3K (2880 x 1620) display for that much, today.

Are we *sure* we need as much as 4K for a 15 incher? I'm not...

I think the trick is that once 2160 starts to become more of a thing, I'm hoping 1080p or 1440p becomes a more standard "lower" resolution. At the moment the vast majority of laptops out there today come with a pretty poor 1366x768 display.

I just bought an LG G2 smartphone, it has a 5.2" 1080p display and cost me US$400. But my laptop I bought last year for twice that has 15.2" 1366x768... my smartphone screen is a third of the size and twice the resolution.

I think the trick is that once 2160 starts to become more of a thing, I'm hoping 1080p or 1440p becomes a more standard "lower" resolution. At the moment the vast majority of laptops out there today come with a pretty poor 1366x768 display.

Hmm fair enough

Major_Plonquer said,
.... he typed on his made in china keyboard....


how did you guess that?! are you some kind of chinese?! and pressing keys on my chinese keyboards gives you "the vibes"?

Does the desktop still have high_DPI scaling problems? The max res at my house is 1440p, and the desktop appears fine. But I know 1440p isn't that high these days.

ZipZapRap said,
Does the desktop still have high_DPI scaling problems? The max res at my house is 1440p, and the desktop appears fine. But I know 1440p isn't that high these days.

The desktop overall with 8.1 is better at it but that's not to say every app would be fine, I'm still on 1080p on my desktop (22" monitor). So I can't say how higher than 1440p is personally.

The bigger issue is lack of testing, it's been hard to find a high PPI screen for people to test their apps on, so they either ignore the PPI entirely, or mishandle it because they simply don't know it breaks.

Once screens like this become normal on developer machines, then you'll see lots of apps that handle the densities correctly.

TruckWEB said,
Try any Adobe apps... They don't know what to do with HiDPI...

That's my worry. I basically use the desktop exlusively for PS/LR and Explorer. Adobe is okay on 1440p, but I don't want any issues above that.

I bet it would start from double that price in Australia. Good luck selling them in masses here. If they sell that beast here with just currency conversion and GST then I would be interested.

For the same price,who would choose Google glasses over this? I simply can't find a reason not to get this beast.

Kalint said,
You're trying to hard...

"to hard... WHAT?

why dont you finish your sentence?! no one understands what are you talking about

they are different products, i could say why would i pay $1499 rather than $999 on a desktop.

Google Glass is a prototype device which offers a new method of interaction. The high price is due to low production numbers. Wearable devices are the future Glass is the first stepping stone, ok it's not perfect but it's a start and so far it's had no challengers.

Personally i love New Technology always have done, i would love to grab a pair of Google Glasses however i don't have that sort of cash on that kind of device and it also probably wouldn't work so well here in the UK.

Heck I'd be happy just to have a laptop with a 1080p display. 95% of 14-16-inch laptops still have 1366x786, even 1600x900 is hard to find (and invariably overpriced).

ReptileX said,
Now we just need the graphics options to keep up with that resolution

Indeed. It's disappointing that the top-performing card, the R9 295X2, costs $1500 and can't even manage 60fps at 4K in games like Crysis 3 or Metro: Last Light. It's going to take a while longer before 4K is practical on PC. Hopefully DX12 will help things out, along with the introduction of 6 / 8 core consumer processors from Intel.

If DX11 is inefficient as developers and MS are claiming to be with their promotion of DX12, it's possible the 295X2 could get pushed harder along with other cards. But this really depends if MS claims for doubling the performance through DX12 are in fact true. It'll obviously take another 5 years for 4K to become standardized. It's actually exciting to see this industry finally agree across the line on 4K. I would love to have such screen real estate.