Trapster hacked; 10 million users might be at risk

The popular online speed trap tracker, Trapster, has issued an email to its 10 million registered members, citing that their passwords may have been hacked. The mobile application is available on a number of smartphones, including the iPhone, a number of BlackBerry and Android headsets and other smartphones.

The website has over 10 million mobile users, who all might be at risk of having their password stolen. The company issued an email stating that users should change their passwords. Although the company still doesn't know exactly how much data was compromised, they can only assume the hacker acquired all of the online mobile data, which includes usernames, emails and passwords.

How do I know if my password was hacked?

We believe it's best to be cautious.  So, if you've registered your account with Trapster, then it's best to assume that your e-mail address and password were included among the compromised data.

With over 10 million email accounts and passwords stolen, it won't take long for a hacker, or team of hackers, to decrypt the encrypted passwords. It's recommended that users change their password on Trapster and any other account on the Internet they share the same password with.

This database leak comes just a month after Gawker had their database, source code and other private information stolen. A list of usernames and unencrypted passwords were later posted on the Internet.

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24 Comments

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Does this even work?? I mean without some sort of online connection or automatic upload of a detection what good is it? Sounds even bad to start with if a driver passes a cop sitting on the side of the road, reaches down to start a text message to trapster while at the same time drifts off the road across the grass and into a lane of another car perhaps filled with kids.. yeah this is smart and most certainly how it works or so it would appear from what I read of it.

I don't remember what my password was for the site; thanks a lot, Trapster. Now I don't know if my password has been compromised, as there are still a couple of sites that I use similar passwords on (althought 95% have been randomized, following the Gakwer disaster).

agreenbhm said,
I don't remember what my password was for the site; thanks a lot, Trapster. Now I don't know if my password has been compromised, as there are still a couple of sites that I use similar passwords on (althought 95% have been randomized, following the Gakwer disaster).

So why dont you the forgotten passowrd link and change it. And why are you saying,
agreenbhm said,
thanks a lot, Trapster.

I'm sure they didnt want to be hacked. Fool

Gothic_Rebel said,

So why dont you the forgotten passowrd link and change it. And why are you saying,

I'm sure they didnt want to be hacked. Fool

I think the point is he wanted to know what password he needed to change elsewhere as well. At this point I have considered the one password of mine compromised and most places already have it changed to something else.

shinji257 said,

I think the point is he wanted to know what password he needed to change elsewhere as well. At this point I have considered the one password of mine compromised and most places already have it changed to something else.

Exactly. Thank you for clarifying.

agreenbhm said,
I don't remember what my password was for the site; thanks a lot, Trapster. Now I don't know if my password has been compromised, as there are still a couple of sites that I use similar passwords on (althought 95% have been randomized, following the Gakwer disaster).

just make sure noone can get your email, use different nicknames and password combinations, and how would this be an issue?
if for example Neowin blows up sharing their user databases, GL finding out where else i'm registered with what password

I think this is fake too. I did get the e-mail, but no where on their site (under Blog or News) does it say anything about this.

With over 10 million email accounts and passwords stolen, it won't take long for a hacker, or team of hackers, to decrypt the encrypted passwords. It's recommended that users change their password on Trapster and any other account on the Internet they share the same password with.

...

How, if they are properly salted and hashed it would take a very very very long time

XerXis said,
With over 10 million email accounts and passwords stolen, it won't take long for a hacker, or team of hackers, to decrypt the encrypted passwords. It's recommended that users change their password on Trapster and any other account on the Internet they share the same password with.

...

How, if they are properly salted and hashed it would take a very very very long time


*IF* is the key word there.

Andrew Lyle said,

*IF* is the key word there.

I emailed them to ask them IF they actually encrypted the passwords in their database or not.

They replied to say that they would not be releasing that information, cause it might help the hackers.... EPIC FAIL...

They won't even say if the passwords were secure or not. F$# me.