Twitter co-founder Biz Stone launches Jelly

In case walking down the street becomes an existential quandary 

A new application founded by Twitter co-founder Biz Stone allows questions to be answered through human knowledge and interaction.

Jelly, as it's called, aims to utilize the increasing power of social networking by allowing people to share their knowledge rather than relying on a conventional search engine. The app is designed around the idea of paying your knowledge "forward" to those who are a part your social network and vice-versa. 

A user can pose a question inside Jelly and his network buddies try to answer. Once that happens the user receives a notification. If the question is not answered or if your friends are being a-holes unhelpful, it may also be forwarded to the online community who may then solve your problem.

According to the website, Jelly has transformed the way questions are answered through the use of images and other users on the site and beyond.

"Say you’re walking along and you spot something unusual. You want to know what it is so you launch Jelly, take a picture, circle it with your finger, and type, “What’s this?” That query is submitted to some people in your network who also have Jelly. Jelly notifies you when you have answers."

The company claims that the creativity, inventiveness and experience of the human mind match or even outperform algorithms of typical search engines.

Jelly is now available to download for both iOS and Android devices.

Sources: Jelly, BRW | Image via Jelly

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14 Comments

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Yahoo answers has a lot of flaws but it is still very popular and my only thing I like by yahoo. These sites have a lot of fud, but overall they can be very beneficial. It covers a large range of categories without the need to find a forum to join.

But annoying immature brats have no filters on the internet and just spu out all the garbage they must say with out consequences of their parents to worry about.

Cue people posting images of their genitalia asking "Is it supposed to be red and itchy?" or "Is this big enough?"

Grunt said,
Cue people posting images of their genitalia asking "Is it supposed to be red and itchy?" or "Is this big enough?"

Nah, probably using the ImageDNA thingy MS uses in Skydrive or whatever Facebook is using now.

Grunt said,
Cue people posting images of their genitalia asking "Is it supposed to be red and itchy?" or "Is this big enough?"

at least you will stop sending them to me