Two Major Linux Groups Merge to Fight Microsoft

Open Source Development Labs (OSDL) and the Free Standards Group (FSG) have merged to form the Linux Foundation. Jim Zemlin, FSG's executive director, will be in charge of the new company. He announced Tuesday the final steps to combine the companies are currently taking place. Zemlin believes that since now Linux has established its presence as an operating system for embedded, desktop, and server systems - OSDL and FSG's mission, which began in 2000, has been achieved. Linux Foundation will now aim to help the Linux community more effectively compete with its primary rival, Microsoft.

Read on: PC World

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Numbers Behind Windows 95, Vista

Next Story

Intel Announces 4965AGN Wireless

21 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

It is nice to have strong Linux users group merged their forces.

However, I hope people can remember to balance the society of the computing industry. I don't want someday to hear that Linus controls most the PCs.

Maybe if the linux community and linuc develeper groups would focus less on microsoft, and more on making linux better, more intuitive and easier to use (no having to ever edit a text file for example, install files that actually lets the user know where they install stuff, cros distro compatibility that installs and also allways adds the program to the menu), then maybe they wouldn't have to allways Merge to "fight" microsoft.

Well it is good news to some but not all. Linux is not hard to operate as some people think. I sometimes have difficulty finding divers or hardware. Fortunately, I know how make batch and hex to make them work.

guruparan said,
hmm...good...

but i never use Linux :P

i wont use it too!...sticking with my Vista ultimate.. :)

I don't understand why everyone feels the need to announce that they are using Ultimate, like that makes you a god or something. Congratulations, you have a ton of features and crap your never going to use. Try sticking with the topic at hand.

I think this is very good news for everyone involved. I look forward to future releases, just got into using Linux. Hopefully this will lower prices and create the competitiveness that is needed in the OS field. They just need to make certain parts of Linux easier to use so that the common user can benefit from it.

This is nothing but good news for corporate end users and even the general consumer. The more competition in the industry, the more that companies like MS are forced to compete by innovating and lowering prices. I like having a lot of choices when it comes to my tech tools and toys.

Agreed. Microsoft should now know that they can't afford to take so much time and money to deploy their next operating system. They can get away with it this time (Vista) but with increasing competition they should be planning a lot more strategically and efficiently to keep their well-earned market share.

Right now, when a general consumer walks into a computer store they pretty much have a choice between the different versions of Vista. A handful will offer a choice betwwn Vista and Mac OS X. It'd be interesting to one day see a store with 4 or 5 different OS's on the shelf, all from different vendors, and for the sales associate to say that each has its own pro's and con's and the end consumer has to decide what is best or more appealing for them personally (put the 'personal' back in 'personal computer'). Each OS has to compete on features, end support, and of course, price.

You'll never see a boxed, retail version of Linux that will succeed unless (1) its easy for the average user to learn and understand (2) and reliable technical support is available.

Of course, there are lots of emerging technologies that bring rivals together as well, such as Parallels allowing Macs to run Windows software and Mac software at the same time in OS X. This makes for personal computers and corporate environments to become much more mixed and not just black and white.

A mixed environemnt isn't always the best, either, because the more complex your environment the higher your IT and support costs can be.

But choice is a good thing.

Agreed. This move is good for everyone. For Linux users like myself, we get better hardware support thanks to the increased recognition of Linux. For Windows users, they get better products and lower prices.

C_Guy said,
It'd be interesting to one day see a store with 4 or 5 different OS's on the shelf, all from different vendors, and for the sales associate to say that each has its own pro's and con's and the end consumer has to decide what is best or more appealing for them personally (put the 'personal' back in 'personal computer'). Each OS has to compete on features, end support, and of course, price.

Agree as well! This was how it was supposed to be, and I hope one day is reality. Such limited competition sucks.

I just wish that all the software that I use on Windows box would be made available for *nix as well. I dabble with *nix when the mood suits me but I can't see permanently switching anytime soon because of my software requirements.

C_Guy said,
You'll never see a boxed, retail version of Linux that will succeed unless (1) its easy for the average user to learn and understand...

They are not willing to learn and understand how to use Windows properly much less an entirly new operating system.