Two million tiny Raspberry Pi computers have now been sold

The tiny Raspberry Pi PC was first revealed back in mid-2011, with the aim of delivering a low-power and ultra-affordable computing device, featuring just the absolute basics needed to give enthusiasts and students a solid foundation on which to build and develop their own computing ideas.

A $35 version of the Pi went on sale last year and quickly sold out, while an even cheaper model was launched earlier this year for just $25, two months after the Raspberry Pi Foundation revealed that they had sold around one million of the mini-PCs.

The Foundation has now revealed that the 2,000,000th Raspberry Pi was sold at the end of October – several months ahead of expectations. In a blog post, the Foundation said: “We never thought we’d be where we are today when we started this journey: it’s down to you, our amazing community, and we’re very, very lucky to have you. Thanks!”

In March, a competition challenged 8- to 18-year-olds to use the Raspberry Pi to “make the world better”, resulting in many creative applications, including a sensor to help homeowners monitor their power consumption, and a system for disabled persons that would enable them to remotely unlock their front door to let visitors in.

The Pirate Bay also expressed an interest in the Raspberry Pi, suggesting that they could use the device in airborne server drones

Source and image: Raspberry Pi Foundation

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For people wanting WiFi you can plug in a small usb wifi dongle which seem to work fine as long as the chipset i supported via the OS. Raspmc has support for a lot of of dongle if your using one for a media centre

Although I don't own one myself it is amazing the reach this thing has had. Most of the guys at work own one using it as a media streamer. If my TV didn't already stream via dlna I would get one myself as well.

It is great value for what it is it also seems to be getting out there into the not so well off countries as tools for learning. Only good things can come from that.

It's so much more than dlna though, the plugins let you stream from your favorite sites and services in a uniform interface. You can control a PVR backend and stream live TV with an amazing guide. It's what every smart TV and set top wants to be, except without all of their promotions and ads and branding all over your user interface. It's beautiful. And it's got apps. And it can show you lyrics for your songs, download art and descriptions for music and videos. There's really nothing better.

The best computer for £30 you can buy... so many uses. Use mine for WoLF and web site checking and another for an internal wordpress site. Amazing for such a small device.

I agree, it's very handy and with a nicely 3d printed shell around it, hardly noticeable in the living room. I doubt it will properly do HEVC at some point though...

Oh yeah it won't be able to do HEVC, it relies on hardware decoding for MPEG2/H.264, and H.265 is much more resource intensive.

Even my 2Ghz Mac can't decode 1080p H.265 without dropping frames.

I've bought two so far and had both DOA. The first place refunded my money despite my requesting an exchange. The second completely ignored my request so I'm stuck with a dead board. (Don't buy from Allied Electronics!) I'd love a super-compact XBMC device, but so far it looks like the Pi won't be it.

I considered it but it didn't have all the codecs I wanted out of the box and the only advantage I see is faster boot times, but I just leave mine always on since it barely uses the power of a nightlight.