Two-tier internet could damage future growth

A 'two-tier' internet where content providers pay a premium to guarantee a speedy web site will damage the future growth of the web, according to search giant Google. The net neutrality principle ­ which argues that everyone should have equal access to data on the internet ­ is the key to ensuring fair competition online, Google director of research Peter Norvig told Computing. 'The net has grown far beyond the original perception bounds because it is open and because services can be launched without being fettered by higher-level control,' said Norvig.

'At Google, we think it is good for competition to try to keep services this way, and that is what we are going to push for,' he said. The net neutrality debate is taking off in the US. Google is asking the communications regulator to ensure the winner of the current wireless spectrum auctions will act as a wholesaler, guaranteeing competition

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News source: vnunet

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black_death said,
Im pretty sure this has always been the case, last I checked people pay more for faster servers with faster connections.

You guys just aren't getting it, are you?

Ever hear of a car pool lane on a freeway? You only get to use it if you have two or more people in your car – no matter how much power and speed your car has!

Well, a two-tiered Internet is just like that. No matter how much bandwidth you have, if a given path gets congested, you get shoved into the slow lanes while the more "valuable" corporate customers get to continue using the fast ones.

This isn't about faster servers with faster connections, it's about over-selling servers and connections so that the little guy gets his bandwidth taken away if things gets tight.

Whilst I agree that Net Neutrality is only a good thing considering the tech powerhouse that is the US, but Europe doesn't have it, and the UK certainly doesn't - OFCOM refuses to get involved.

Every heard of it causing problems in the UK? No, me neither.

It's bound to happen. It already happens with TV, those with the money get noticed, if you want more channels you pay for them. We live in a capitalist society, get used to it.

My last reply to you was deleted because I disagreed with having people like you cower in corners and take whatever someone gives you without question. 15 year olds with power, I tell you...

So, to make up for it, I'll agree with you. Please, take whatever 'the man' gives you just because they say so, keep your head down in public, and always take orders without question, no matter how many innocent people it effects or the negative effects it would have on the world.

Zoue said,
It's bound to happen. It already happens with TV, those with the money get noticed, if you want more channels you pay for them. We live in a capitalist society, get used to it.

There's a point where a "capitalist" society becomes a fascist oligarchy.

Wouldn't slowing down or stopping access to a website be anti-competitive behaviour anyway? We all know if Microsoft stopped Google programs working on Windows they'd be sued within a minute, why would AT & T stopping Google sites from working through their connections be any different?

It doesn't seem like its legal to begin with.

It would Microsoft the internet in that it would dictate content in a very limited way and more unwanted iCandy as well. That's a bad thing.

I already have a very fast connection at 15 Mbps and I've tested it out as such as well.

Only website owners would be paying it, afaik. The problem is only the big websites could afford it, and the young startups with innovative ideas couldn't get going because they don't have the money to do pay to be seen. Google was once in that bracket, so they probably understand better than most.

The problem is not companies and individuals paying for extra bandwidth – that's already an accepted fact of life that nobody really has a problem with. The problem is ISPs throttling the bandwidth of those who aren't paying extra to give it to those who are.

Don't want somebody stealing your bandwidth and selling it to somebody else? Then you better be ready to pay up! And if this sounds like extortion to you...well duhhh...

MightyJordan said,
I wouldn't mind paying a bit extra for a guaranteed fast connection. It's a good thing.

You haven't read up on this at all, have you?

MightyJordan said,
I wouldn't mind paying a bit extra for a guaranteed fast connection. It's a good thing.

Why should you pay extra for a relatively better connection when users in Asian countries and parts of Europe are getting far more for the same price?

Do you see what the scam US broadband companies are trying to pull is? How do you justify charging extra for, say, 30Mbps, when users in Japan get 100Mbps for the SAME PRICE?

Tiered internet is a scam.