Ubisoft says it wants to make friends again with PC gamers

In 2012, Ubisoft ended its controversial DRM setup for its PC games which previously required that users always be connected to the Internet to play a game, even in single player. Now an Ubisoft executive claims the publisher wants to make nice with the PC gamers it may have made angry in the past.

According to an MCV interview, Uplay director Stephanie Perotti stated, " ... we want to improve out relationship with the PC community. We are always seeking to improve. We took a lot of that feedback on board. With every game on PC we are improving."

The company has been making more of an effort to make its PC games more than mere ports of console titles, at least according to Ubisoft. Perotti says, "Far Cry 3 and Assassin’s Creed III on PC were very high quality." She also says that Ubisoft is expanding its Uplay PC game download store to include games from more publishers such as Electronic Arts, Warner Bros, Telltale and Bohemia Interactive.

Ubisoft is also planning to sell pre-paid cards in retail stores for the Uplay service, similar to cards for Steam, Xbox Live and others. When asked why we need another PC game download store, Perotti says, "“I don’t think you can have too much choice. It is just another way to expose more content."

Source: MCV | Image via Ubisoft

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25 Comments

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I commented on the gamespot article, so here's my repost.

They can start by getting rid of Uplay. Having to use DRM within DRM, one that previously had a sever browser exploit even, is beyond ludicrous.

1) If you're going to sell your games on Steam, then make them native to Steam and not require UPlay.

2) If you want UPlay to be a success, you need to offer something different to steam; how about you let people sell their UPlay games to other UPlay members through a built-in system and you take a small cut. Just see how many people would join your platform then.

3) Fire whatever ****-tard thought always-on DRM was a good idea. Stop treating your paying customers like thieves.

4) Keep working hard at UPlay. I may never use it for a game, but I do not like having a monopoly in a market, and as good as Steam is it should have competition.

5) Sort out your support. I tried to use them once and they were embarrassingly bad. Support is a hard job to be in, but the people that do this work interface directly with your customers and if your support team isn't able to provide a good service then your customers won't be happy.

6) Games should be works of art, not cookie-cut sequels churned out to make you money. I loved Far Cry 3, but cringed when I read you were surprised at how well it sold and already started work on a sequel. That sounds like a money-grab rather than making a game for the love of telling a good story.

It's pretty easy to make friends with the PC gaming community; just stop putting out awful console ports while simultaneously trying to f**k them anyway you can with DRM and forcing them to sign up for your s**t services that offer nothing of value.

Kill uplay as a requirement to play games and then I'll consider even listening to anything Ubisoft has to say in the future.

Also get rid of everyone currently working on the present and future Ghost Recon titles and replace them with the team that brought us the original Ghost Recon.

So far the best thing Ubisoft has put out under the Ghost Recon title since the original Ghost Recon is Ghost Recon Online, and that isn't saying much.

I wouldn't mind signing in in-game to Uplay but the stupid Rockstar Social club style launchers for some of the Assassins games serve no value other than to annoy (especially for Steam's Big Picture Mode).

There uplay and support services are a total joke. Spent over 2 months trying to get Fracry 3 to work online on PC. Needless to say they spent weeks doing nothing but sending me cut&paste email responses and if not that there support system trys to mark the ticket solved every 2 days, even when it isnt.

They asked for key information such as serial etc 4 emails in after initially helping me, god knows why? To this day I still cant play online, I gave up after they sighted my ISP as the problem. Tho its actually because they decided to use a port a lot of ISP`s automatically ghost.

But yeh overall a total shower of incompetance and I WONT be buying Ubisoft again.

If they want to make me happy, all they need to do is delete their store & make all old & new titles fully steamworks integrated.

Same goes for EA, no matter how much I want their games, I won't buy them unless they go on steam, I don't want a million separate installs, it's like going back in time to having a pile of disks on the side to rummage through -_-

DRM is a problem for everyone except pirates. Some of it even borked up people's computer, I'm looking at you StarForce.

Steam is the best legit game store IMO, but if I buy a game somewhere else and it has some stupid DRM with it I will still get a crack to bypass the hindrance.

The problem is that quite a lot of major title games on Steam still use DRM/Activation limits e.g. Batman AA, Batman AC, GFWL games (Fable III, FlatOut UC), etc.

I had to patch Batman like a pirate just to be able to play a game I purchased legitimately via Steam due to Securom bull****.

If they wanna be friends with PC gamers again, I'd recommend following 2K's lead and using Steamworks on all your games; it works great with Rocksmith. Oh, and speaking of Rocksmith, there's a simple way to make friends with me, Ubisoft: reduce the cost of Rocksmith DLC songs from £2.39 down to 99p.

MightyJordan said,
If they wanna be friends with PC gamers again, I'd recommend following 2K's lead and using Steamworks on all your games; it works great with Rocksmith. Oh, and speaking of Rocksmith, there's a simple way to make friends with me, Ubisoft: reduce the cost of Rocksmith DLC songs from £2.39 down to 99p.

Have to agree, rocksmith is great on steam and it confuses me why they deploy on steam and then include their own DRM as well? Smells more like they're trying to grab more users for their own steam like platform then actually providing service for customers, or indeed DRM for their own game since steam already provides that as you said, via steamworks.

But yeah, have to agree the DLC songs for rocksmith are really expensive. It's a shame they don't have options for Indie bands to release their own tracks for free, it'd be a great way for the community to play free tracks and Indie bands to get a bit of recognition.

Kill UPlay and all the bloatware distributed with your games, Give me an option to switch all your online achievements rubbish off.

Frankly I'm much more unhappy with developers who forget the PC entirely then developers to who make PC games with DRM. And Ubisoft has been very good over the years at making PC versions of their games.

And as far as DRM type goes, I actually prefer an online account-based system over a system that has to be activated per-PC. For all the complaints that Diablo III's DRM method has received, I've actually been suggesting that method since before Diablo III was even announced. It's easy to use - just install the game on all the computers you want and login to play. And it's probably the only DRM method that actually works.

Chugworth said,
Frankly I'm much more unhappy with developers who forget the PC entirely then developers to who make PC games with DRM. And Ubisoft has been very good over the years at making PC versions of their games.

And as far as DRM type goes, I actually prefer an online account-based system over a system that has to be activated per-PC. For all the complaints that Diablo III's DRM method has received, I've actually been suggesting that method since before Diablo III was even announced. It's easy to use - just install the game on all the computers you want and login to play. And it's probably the only DRM method that actually works.

Don't bend to their ways. Always on activation as seen in the past and recently again in EA's Origin service is poor form. Without any incentive to make you use it nor the ability to play offline for time when you don't have a connection.

Steam's alternative is much better,. While it still IS a DRM and it does require you to log in to download the game, it does have options for offline play. It's just a shame some publishers (Ahem, EA/uplay) require you to have their own DRM clients as well so it just makes the use of steam's offline play useless.

Stand up for your rights, don't be fooled and just agree with what they want to enforce on you. Steams not perfect by any means, but at least it provides incentives and is not 100% restrictive in the way the DRM works.

sagum said,
Stand up for your rights, don't be fooled and just agree with what they want to enforce on you.

You have the right to play the game in whatever format they provide it in.

Personally I'd much rather have to be logged in than deal with limited activations again. That's just bull****.

So Ubisoft are finally learning that you can't just shaft your customers and expect them to bend over and take it? Good for them. Admission is the first step towards recovery.

Majesticmerc said,
So Ubisoft are finally learning that you can't just shaft your customers and expect them to bend over and take it? Good for them. Admission is the first step towards recovery.

Now if only they did the right thing and got rid of that stupid uPlay software annoyance for games on steam.

Very well said... I agree with here. Although, I do think they are taking the right road with uPlay. Alright granted some people hate uPlay but not all of us do. I don't mind going through two interfaces from Steam to uPlay and then play the game it doesn't bother me in the slightest.