Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat released

Every April and October, Ubuntu issues a new release of their operating system, with an interesting code name. Today Ubuntu released their next major version, codenamed "Maverick Meerkat", which just so happened to be released on 10/10/10 at 10:10 UTC.

With the new Ubuntu 10.10 release, comes a new font in the typeface family, bringing users Latin, Cyrillic and Greek with the choice of regular, italic, bold and bold italic styles and weights. Not only does this release ship with a new font, but Ubuntu has become the first ever operating system to ship with the new Indian Rupee Sign for their currency. Ubuntu will continue to work on Arabic, Hebrew and Monospace font support in future releases.

Ubuntu 10.10 brings an improved installer with a new design, making it easier to use and install updates and drivers.

What's new in this release?

  • The GNOME base platform has been updated to version 2.32, which includes dconf and gsettings API.
  • Evolution was updated to version 2.30, which operates much faster than previous versions.
  • F-Spot has now been replaced by Shotwell as the default photo manager.
  • Gwibber has been updated to use Twitters new OAuth, their new authentication system.
  • The sound menu has been enhanced to include music player controls.
  • Ubuntu One has received a big update with improved sign-up and sign-in integration, Nautilus enhancements for managing folder sync preferences, faster file transfer speeds and the ability to share links to music within the Ubuntu One Music Store.
  • New bootup screen.

The netbook edition of Ubuntu has a new interface, different from the desktop and server edition. Both the desktop and netbook editions come with the Social From The Start menu, allowing you to access Twitter, Facebook and Identi.ca. You can see and update all your accounts from a single window.

Ubuntu_Netbook_1010_interface

Kubuntu 10.10 comes with the latest version of the KDE software. KDE Platform, Workspace and Applications were all updated to 4.5.1. Kubuntu has merged both the Desktop and Netbook images into one image, featuring the Plasma Desktop and Plasma Netbook workspace. Many applications and settings received big updates, you can read more about the updates here.

Ubuntu Server Edition has been updated to the next major release of Eucalyptus 2.0. This release comes with numerous bug fixes, improved stability and better user management. Ubuntu 10.10 Server Edition comes with Cloud support on Amazon EC2.

Ubuntu 10.10 is available in both 32bit and 64bit edition and available for free from Ubuntu.com. You can also enjoy our forum discussion of Ubuntu 10.10 here.

Thanks to MrChainsaw for his help!

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Bug how is the speed?

For a netbook,
== Boot Time < 30 Sec?
== RAM Usage < 500MB (Windows 7 x86_32)? Or maybe < 120MB (XP)?
== Does it support back/forward buttons on a mouse?
== Does hw accelerated video work? Does the user still have to manually enable it?
== For Intel GPUs? (They are awesome for video playback actually)

Ubuntu's netbook edition has had a sub-30s boot time for over a year now, and that's still the case.

Not so for Kubuntu, though. But KDE has always been the sluggish shell. Oddly enough, for 10.10 Kubuntu has the most work-space. Never thought Ubuntu would kick Gnome out of the minimalist spotlight.

10.10 detected my Nvidia 460 and showed up as a restricted driver which allowed me to install easily, once installed advanced graphic features seemed to be turn on. 10.04 had to install the nvidia driver manually / it did not detect as a restricted driver.

10.04 is plenty speedy, 10.10 seems even better.

I did an upgrade - luckily Im not a next-next-next-finish type person and learns how things work. my nvidia driver had to be reinstalled - from terminal.
since the initial terminal was logged in and trying to get something to work, instead of CTRL + C I pressed ALT + F2 and logged in as root, then issued this command:

apt-get install nvidia-current

then I rebooted and login prompt was back. ubuntu is faster than ever, cairo-dock works better, effects are smooth. Programs load up faster than before. I'm enjoying it now until I find broken packages of course

If it don't come back for you after reboot, just issue nvidia-xconfig as root or sudo from your user account. then reboot again. this rebuilds your x11 config. startx may work, but I suggest a reboot just cause its the windows way

Installed 10.04 and been dual-booting Win 7 and Ubuntu for a few months now... During the first months I guess I only spent about 2 days of 30 in Ubuntu. When 10.10 alpha was released I decided to upgrade and not boot Windows for a week. The rest is history. I only keep Win7 around for those rare times I do gaming, but otherwise it's all Ubuntu. Everything works great, watching movies, listen to music, write documents etc. It's got all I need, and it's free. I'll never pay MS a dime again.

Frankenchrist said,
Installed 10.04 and been dual-booting Win 7 and Ubuntu for a few months now... During the first months I guess I only spent about 2 days of 30 in Ubuntu. When 10.10 alpha was released I decided to upgrade and not boot Windows for a week. The rest is history. I only keep Win7 around for those rare times I do gaming, but otherwise it's all Ubuntu. Everything works great, watching movies, listen to music, write documents etc. It's got all I need, and it's free. I'll never pay MS a dime again.

I'm glad you joined the revolution brother

Lilrich said,
Has the black screen on install been fixed in this release?

It's a Wubi issue. If you do a clean install, dual boot, or upgrade you shouldn't have a problem.

Why do they continue to use that horrid brown as the default colour. I know you can change it but first impressions and all that!
Will try it out later...

Riggers said,
Why do they continue to use that horrid brown as the default colour.

Are you looking at the same screenshots I'm looking at above, because I don't see brown.

roadwarrior said,

Are you looking at the same screenshots I'm looking at above, because I don't see brown.

He clearly didn't even bother to look before spewing the obligatory "It's ugly" response that's so common on these forums.

Microsoft_Bob said,

He clearly didn't even bother to look before spewing the obligatory "It's ugly" response that's so common on these forums.

Hold your horses there Jim Bob, i did take a good look and it looks brown or a least grey/brown especially on the page that`s open in the taskbar. Maybe i`m colour blind but i said i didn`t like the colour (which is changeable). I think the overall appearance isn`t to bad and am going to try it out later.
You really need to take a chill pill and stop freaking out. This is typical Ubuntu blah blah which turns a lot of people off, i remember when i first installed it several years back i had a problem so asked in the forum. Talk about unwelcoming and trying to make you look inferior.

I've downloaded the release candidate x64 ISO a couple of weeks ago (when it was first released), and just yesterday i wanted to install it with wubi, and wubi insisted on redownloading the iso, and only after that i discovered that it downloaded and installed the final version

Great Wubi, Great Ubuntu, this time i will use it when i don't need some Windows-only apps, because i can finally have Flash for x64 ubuntu (Flash Square )

Really good release from what I've seen so far, the interface looks sweet and it seems much quicker. Love the new font too.

yowan said,
Still no gnome 3.0?

Not until next April at the earliest. Sucks, I'm looking forward to it, too. For this iteration of Ubuntu, I think my netbook'll be going with KDE. Meh.

Just installed Ubuntu Netbook Edition on my old Eee, and I'm seriously disappointed. It feels like a monstrous step backwards. System settings are buried, and customization is even harder than it was before. Is there a way to hide the side bar? If there is, they don't want you to know about it.

Which leads to the primary complaint: epic waste of screen space. These are netbooks, guys. What's the big idea throwing something permanently up on the screen? On top of that, if you want to run a few applications from the same category (lets say you're first setting up after a clean install), you have to completely renavigate through your apps each time.

In 10.04, you could just go to the system area of your launcher and go applet by applet, customizing your Ubuntu. Now, it's applications --> system --> applet. Done? Okay, repeat: applications --> system --> applet. Talk about over-complicating.

And is it seriously--honestly guys, seriously?--NOT offering two lines of text for icons on the grids? OpenOffice.org Word Processor, for example, just looks like "OpenOff...ocessor" in my Applications menu. Holy crap.

If Microsoft released something like this, reviewers would take them to the cleaners for pushing beta-quality code to consumers. Sorry Ubuntu, you would've been better off skipping this one. You represent Linux's best effort at appealing to CONSUMERS, not enthusiasts, so no amount of "code it yourself if that's how you want it" egotistical douchebaggery can make up for this.

Joshie said,

On top of that, if you want to run a few applications from the same category (lets say you're first setting up after a clean install), you have to completely renavigate through your apps each time.

thats what i thought at first untill i clicked that ubuntu icon on top left, it will show the category view, one more click than 10.04 but glad its there otherwise as ur using it is pain.

about waste of space, its more space then 10.04 what are u talking about.

Joshie said,
Just installed Ubuntu Netbook Edition on my old Eee, and I'm seriously disappointed. It feels like a monstrous step backwards. System settings are buried, and customization is even harder than it was before. Is there a way to hide the side bar? If there is, they don't want you to know about it.

Log out, click your username (but don't login), and select 'Ubuntu Desktop Edition' from the (I think) 'Session' menu at the bottom.

atifsh said,

thats what i thought at first untill i clicked that ubuntu icon on top left, it will show the category view, one more click than 10.04 but glad its there otherwise as ur using it is pain.

about waste of space, its more space then 10.04 what are u talking about.

In what way is this more space than 10.04's netbook edition? Windows maximized in 10.04 to take up the full width of the screen, and this one takes more than a half inch of horizontal space away from me with no apparent way to override or autohide.

And tomjol, seriously? Are you seriously taking that approach? They release a new version, and the older version was more intuitive, so rather than give negative feedback, just don't use netbook edition AT ALL?

When a product takes a step backwards, negative feedback is important.

Joshie said,

And tomjol, seriously? Are you seriously taking that approach? They release a new version, and the older version was more intuitive, so rather than give negative feedback, just don't use netbook edition AT ALL?

When a product takes a step backwards, negative feedback is important.

Who said I wasn't giving negative feedback?

IMO the previous netbook edition menu-thingy was also terrible, though at least it didn't stay on the screen the entire time. This just seems like a very un-thought-out way to get around moving the application switcher from the top panel so that they could use the global menu bar.

Joshie said,

You represent Linux's best effort at appealing to CONSUMERS, not enthusiasts, so no amount of "code it yourself if that's how you want it" egotistical douchebaggery can make up for this.

Obvious troll is obvious.

Microsoft_Bob said,

Obvious troll is obvious.

Says the guy with a reply to every single comment? o.O

If you think criticizing the Linux community's habit of responding to all criticism with a "code it yourself" is trolling, then yeah, I'm trolling. But if you're supporting that habit, then you're supporting Linux's failure in the consumer space.

Anyone with 5 minutes of experience in customer service or marketing knows more about what consumers demand than apparently your average Linux proponent.

There's simply no denying that Windows unseated Linux as the netbook OS of choice in a matter of weeks. That's VERY disappointing for the Linux effort, but rather than take it to heart and think maybe they're doing something wrong, they just ramp up the MS hate.

strange the bug/problem present in beta was in RC and now in final, netbook edittion unity will not work if u dont have graphic drivers , a common error for many laptop users, but annoyance is when u install drivers after login as desktop session u stuck with it, and have to signout everytime to start unity, otherwise every restart u signin as desktop session.

Mouettus said,
never got to make my dwa-125 (wifi usb dongle) work with 10.04 ... I won't be trying this release

If it has a windows driver, it should work through ndiswrapper.

Educated Idiot said,
Damn, it's that time again already?! As soon as I get more blank CDs, I'm updating the "Buntu Box"!

You can update it without the need to burn a disk.

Educated Idiot said,
Damn, it's that time again already?! As soon as I get more blank CDs, I'm updating the "Buntu Box"!

As said, you can just do an upgrade through the update manager, or do a fresh install on a usb stick

Installed over the top of 10.04 x64, all working ok apart from trying to hunt down some theme elements that are missing. All hardware working ok thusfar.

I hate ubuntu and would prefer the world to use better linux OS's, but I have to say; that really does look like a great improvement over the classic 'diarreah' interface they had years ago.

n_K said,
I hate ubuntu and would prefer the world to use better linux OS's, but I have to say; that really does look like a great improvement over the classic 'diarreah' interface they had years ago.

Obvious troll is obvious.

Ubuntu 10.10 seems really awesome so far.

Does anyone know how to add the Global/Finder Menu Bar present in the Netbook Edition to the Desktop Edition?

BoneyardBrew said,
Ubuntu 10.10 seems really awesome so far.

Does anyone know how to add the Global/Finder Menu Bar present in the Netbook Edition to the Desktop Edition?

sudo apt-get install unity

?

Temperingpick said,

sudo apt-get install unity

?


That just installs the Netbook Edition. I only want the global bar, not the entire notebook interface.

BoneyardBrew said,

That just installs the Netbook Edition. I only want the global bar, not the entire notebook interface.

The package name is (or certainly used to be) 'gnome2-globalmenu'.

BoneyardBrew said,
Ubuntu 10.10 seems really awesome so far.

Agreed. I've just upgraded to it, and it rocks! I love how RhythmBox now integrates with the audio menu The improved software centre is great also.

tomjol said,

The package name is (or certainly used to be) 'gnome2-globalmenu'.


I'm not sure if this is the way it's supposed to be or not, but it doesn't seem to be changing all of the options on the bar like it would in OS X or even in their preview image depending on the application.

When I install it, the only thing I can add is a single menu that changes with the program name and doesn't seem to have the proper options.

Am I doing something wrong, or is that how it's supposed to be?

BoneyardBrew said,

I'm not sure if this is the way it's supposed to be or not, but it doesn't seem to be changing all of the options on the bar like it would in OS X or even in their preview image depending on the application.

When I install it, the only thing I can add is a single menu that changes with the program name and doesn't seem to have the proper options.

Am I doing something wrong, or is that how it's supposed to be?

Sounds like there's some configuration stuff you have to do - try the link above my previous comment (thinking about it I remember having to do some in the past).

tomjol said,

Sounds like there's some configuration stuff you have to do - try the link above my previous comment (thinking about it I remember having to do some in the past).


Got it! Thanks to both of you.

-DanNY- said,

Why would u even switch from ubuntu to begin with?


Probably because there are certain things Windows 7 is better at for him?

Personally I prefer the way I don't feel 'trapped' when I use Windows. Something about the UI of Gnome/KDE is confining.

And on my convertible tablet, well heck, there isn't a single distribution of Linux in existence today that can match Windows 7's usability on it.

-DanNY- said,

Why would u even switch from ubuntu to begin with?

Ubuntu is not compatible with many apps and programs out there. If you only want whats included in the OS I would agree.

bkimbler said,

Ubuntu is not compatible with many apps and programs out there. If you only want whats included in the OS I would agree.


WINE puts your opinion to old hat.
Plus there's plenty of linux-only stuff out there that won't work on windows at all, e.g. memcached (There is a windows port, but compared to the linux version, it's poor). And even apache with PHP, under linux it's stable and doesn't have problems, on my windows server it's incredibly unstable. And PHP echo "text"; sleep(5); echo "more"; does not output ANYTHING on windows until the entire script has been processed whilst on linux it outputs it as the text becomes available. Which is all down to networking support and libraries.
Another brilliant thing; linux on a uni machine! Whilst the internet at the uni I was at was limited to a pathetic 80Kbps on windows, linux bypassed the restriction whether it be VLan or a crappy windows QoS thing, and I was getting 5Mbps. A great improvement.

Joshie said,

Probably because there are certain things Windows 7 is better at for him?

Personally I prefer the way I don't feel 'trapped' when I use Windows. Something about the UI of Gnome/KDE is confining.

And on my convertible tablet, well heck, there isn't a single distribution of Linux in existence today that can match Windows 7's usability on it.

Aptitude. That one word makes anything windows has done look like beans.

-DanNY- said,

Aptitude. That one word makes anything windows has done look like beans.

I'm...not quite sure how that applies to anything I said in my post.

n_K said,

WINE puts your opinion to old hat.
Plus there's plenty of linux-only stuff out there that won't work on windows at all, e.g. memcached (There is a windows port, but compared to the linux version, it's poor). And even apache with PHP, under linux it's stable and doesn't have problems, on my windows server it's incredibly unstable. And PHP echo "text"; sleep(5); echo "more"; does not output ANYTHING on windows until the entire script has been processed whilst on linux it outputs it as the text becomes available. Which is all down to networking support and libraries.
Another brilliant thing; linux on a uni machine! Whilst the internet at the uni I was at was limited to a pathetic 80Kbps on windows, linux bypassed the restriction whether it be VLan or a crappy windows QoS thing, and I was getting 5Mbps. A great improvement.

True enough. But I don't want to have to fiddle with every install I do. Based on app support alone, Windows is still a good option.

LiquidSolstice said,

And this is why I don't like the open-source community.

Yeah, this guy must've been transplanted from the 90s. It's attitudes like that keeping Linux from anything even remotely approaching the mainstream.

Or to put it in more biting terms, more people can sing along with a FreeCreditReports.com jingle than name a Linux distribution. Good job, buddy. You really know how to change the world.

To everyone: This kind of argument is one you can just as well leave alone if you happen to be on the Internet while discussing. It's unwinnable, its dead horse is reeking in an abandoned battlefield, and no one here will change their opinion.

Mike Frett said,
It's open source, make it run yourself.

Do you give your mom or the old lady next door the same advice?

bkimbler said,

Many apps and programs out there are not compatible with Ubuntu/Linux because they were written for windows.

Fixed that for you. Seriously, if you want to use Linux, use Linux apps. There are replacements for virtually every windows app. Wine is only there for transitional purposes, some games, or those few apps where there aren't replacements.

n_K said,

WINE puts your opinion to old hat.

Why would I want to run applications that aren't designed with Linux in mind? I would want to run applications that actually integrate with the OS, make use of its features and behave as such.

Installed it dual with Windows 7 and am loving it. Have not used Ubuntu since v 7 or 8 and this is MUCH improved. Easy installation and everything worked out of the box. Very fast as well.