Unnamed CTO claims he's updating lots of PCs to Windows 8

On Sunday, we reported that a survey of IT employees said that 23.8 percent of them will not update their company's PCs to Windows 8. Another 49.9 percent of the people who were surveyed have "no current plans" for a company-wide Windows 8 update but did say that position could change in the future.

However, a new story over at Business Insider says that the CTO of a large company is wasting little time in making the move to Windows 8. The story says that, according to this unnamed CTO, he will be upgrading lots of his company's PCs to Windows 8 as soon as possible.

The CTO (who is unnamed because he is not authorized to speak about his company's plans) says that part of the reason is that Windows 8 is much faster than the previous Windows 7 OS. Applications run about 15 to 20 percent faster on Windows 8 compared to Windows 7, according to this source. The CTO added, "It's a hell of a lot more responsive."

As far as his specific Windows 8 plans, this CTO says he will decommission 4,000 old PCs and get thousands of the Surface tablets, running under Windows 8 Pro, in their place. 1,000 older Windows 7 PCs will also be upgraded to Windows 8 by this unnamed company.

And what about the training needed to help people get used to the new Windows 8 UI? This unnamed CTO says it won't be a huge problem. He is quoted as saying, "Windows 8 drives you batty for exactly four hours … seriously. Get yourself a Surface and it takes you a day to get used to keyboard and it takes about four hours to learn the touch interface."

Source: Business Insider | Image via Microsoft

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I don't see why you need to train people to use Windows. What's really new about the UI? NOTHING. The start menu is now tiles. If you need the menu you hit the start button on your Microsoft keyboard. All the Windows shortcut keys that most people know, still work. The charms menu is on the right the taskbar is on the left.

lol. I do find this story funny. Normally I am not critical of news because hey, different news for different people. However this doesn't have a name, a company, etc. I might as well say "some unnamed person out there from an unknown company has cured cancer and is keeping the information all to themselves. They also have been able to defeat death." - About as much fact has gone into that statement as this new article.

sathenzar said,
lol. I do find this story funny. Normally I am not critical of news because hey, different news for different people. However this doesn't have a name, a company, etc. I might as well say "some unnamed person out there from an unknown company has cured cancer and is keeping the information all to themselves. They also have been able to defeat death." - About as much fact has gone into that statement as this new article.

It very well could be the company I work for, but I'm not at liberty to say. I work for one of the country's largest financial companys, and the numbers mentioned in the article coincide with ours. There's also talk of the entire company moving to Windows 8 after the first of the year. We've all thought it was BS because most users here are still on XP, which shows how conservative/backward this company is. It certainly lends some credibility to the rumor, though.

Hello,

Another reason for upgrading to Windows 8 are the security improvements over previous versions of Windows.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

Working in IT i highly doubt this story. In fact unless he his CTO of a 10 employees company i simply don't believe it. OS are tested for 1 year and even more before upgrading.

A CTO that can't speak of his company's office tech? Who is dumping 4000 PCs for unproven tablets? With a new OS that is only just now starting to ship?

<sarcasm>Yeah... I am SURE this is legitimate. </sarcasm>

This clown should be terminated.

I suspect Windows 8 will become a succes in the consumermarket but I'm stil doubtful it can succeed in the businessmarket. It seems to me that businesses have too many legacy apps.

Microsoft made a bold move to not really incorporate the old desktop in the new UI. Sure its there but it functions more like DOS-mode did in Windows 98. It's there for when you need to access an old application but you can't easilly work in both the old and the new.

So I imagine the new UI is more of a pain you have to get around to get to the desktop where 90% of your company applications will be running from. Even Office 2013, including Outlook, is a desktop application.

But if more of these reports go out, business-software developers might bring their desktop applications to the new UI. I wouldn't mind using Windows 8 in the office if a majority of the applications are modern.

yeah unnamed CTO said we are going to upgrade 100 PC's.

seems like this CTO is the one who runs small business down the road.

Actually 4 hours is too long, it takes minutes and not hours to pick up the new features. How? Simple -
1) Left click lower left corner brings you to home screen, the start menu replacement
2) Right click lower left corner provides access to control panel, run, command prompt, devices, etc. So all common OS utilities that you use
3) Left click upper left corner switches to previous task, or cycle through tasks
4) Left click upper right corner opens charms, with access to search, settings, devices in context
5) Left click lower right corner does Symantec zoom, so group tiles, name tiles and do quick access
6)Right click on start screen shows lower toolbar with access to all applications installed
7)Tiles can be moved, resized by pulling them down and then moving them around
8) Traditional desktop is just a click away, and you already know how to use it

So just 8 key things for existing Windows 7 users to learn and it should not take more than 5 minutes. All this negative propaganda is from people who have never used it or are simply haters

Any company updating right away to a new consumer OS is incredibly stupid and naive, there is nothing noted about security in the new windows 8, there could be some large holes in it that are waiting to be published.

In other news, an unnamed CTO claims that Windows 8 is a disaster and that users have responded poorly to it.

But in all seriousness, unverifiable stories shouldn't be published. I know this site is pro-Microsoft but this is getting a bit ridiculous.

theyarecomingforyou said,
In other news, an unnamed CTO claims that Windows 8 is a disaster and that users have responded poorly to it.

But in all seriousness, unverifiable stories shouldn't be published. I know this site is pro-Microsoft but this is getting a bit ridiculous.


Pretty much this.

If something like this got published with some Apple product over at one of my fruity places and I'd link people to it in the forums, guess how much laughter it would produce.

GS:mac

I have moved all 5 of my home PC's my 3 work PCs and in-laws, my parents and about 15 other PCs to windows 8 already. and I have got other calls about the new MS OS from people wanting me to help them upgrade from XP, Vista or Windows 7. I have not got my hands on a surface yet but only in time and ill have one of them too

Ok. The Windows 8 Pro version of the Surface is still not available and this CTO has already planned to ditch 4000 PCs and buy those Surface without doing a full test or checking other manufacturers devices.

Time to fire this CTO.

Sounds a little fanciful quite frankly...

TechRepublic's Windows 8 Business Intentions study reveals that 74% of businesses have no plans to deploy Windows 8, and the new, touch-centric user interface is a driving factor in the decision.
73.7 percent of respondents say their organizations have no plans to deploy Windows 8, with 23.8 percent reporting that they will skip the OS altogether.
Some of the comments and reasons given were harsh to say the least!

certain things work for certain situations. Your fork my look prettier and stronger than my spoon but johnny's knife is sharper then both of ours.

Point being: use what benefits your situation the most. If your company works better with a surface, use it. If its better with an Ipad, use it. If its better with a desktop, use it.

The CTO doesn't have to be brave to adopt WIN8 so quickly. MS did it IBM will do it. HP will do it.

Underneath WIN8 Tiles is just a much improved WIN7! The compatibility in devices, the quicker OS responses to existing software, the higher security features built in, the ENTERPRISE features that have been upgraded and added, etc. The list goes on and on. All most can do is complain about the new start tiles interface. The core of this system is really a more stable Windows 7 with much much improved features.

There are now multiple Start Menu apps out there now that will give some users the Start Menu they have been complaining about. But I find a few keystrokes or adding a TrackPad makes life easier.

mrmomoman said,
The CTO doesn't have to be brave to adopt WIN8 so quickly. MS did it IBM will do it. HP will do it.

Underneath WIN8 Tiles is just a much improved WIN7! The compatibility in devices, the quicker OS responses to existing software, the higher security features built in, the ENTERPRISE features that have been upgraded and added, etc. The list goes on and on. All most can do is complain about the new start tiles interface. The core of this system is really a more stable Windows 7 with much much improved features.

There are now multiple Start Menu apps out there now that will give some users the Start Menu they have been complaining about. But I find a few keystrokes or adding a TrackPad makes life easier.

I doubt IBM will adopt it any time soon. Their internal policy is Microsoft, Oracle and HP are our rivals, so we don't adopt their technology to improve their bottom line, unless there is no other way (That probably goes the other way around). They even revived Lotus Office tools a couple of years ago so they didn't need to buy MS Office (It's called Lotus Symphony and is written on top of Open Office).

Oh wait, are we taking this report seriously?. No name, no company, no number of computer, no nothing.

Brony said,
Oh wait, are we taking this report seriously?. No name, no company, no number of computer, no nothing.

Would have been funny as sin if it was Apple goofing on everyone.

Brony said,
CTO and adopting a less than a year old OS?. sheesh, he is a valiant guy or a st*pid suicide.

Or he did the smart thing and has been testing his apps since the Developer Preview came out over a year ago...

dagamer34 said,

Or he did the smart thing and has been testing his apps since the Developer Preview came out over a year ago...


LOL, this is a site for lies and conjecture, truths and logic have no room here! hehe

But wise IT folks would/should have tested months and months ago.

He obviously doesn't work for the company I work for. The latest news about Windows 8 adoption where I work was met with maniacal laughter, followed by a "no way in he!!" response.

Then again, I work for a company that has removed the iPhone from the list of approved devices for cellular connectivity, due to its lack of security.

Alot of companies held off on upgrading systems during the recession and are now willing to make the investment in new systems. If they are going to move from Windows XP and replace these systems instead of just reloading the OS, it makes sense to just get Windows 8. Yes there will be an adjustment period, but most of the people I know of who are Sysadmins/Senior engineers have either gotten used to the differences or found a way work around the issues. I personally think they will sell 200+ million copies by this time next year. Most of that will be with new HW. Its less than what they sold with Windows 7 last year, but that is to be expected.

I completely agree with the final paragraph... Alright, it took me a LITTLE longer than 4 hours, but once it becomes 2nd nature to use the windows key combinations or dragging motions it all falls into place and becomes natural.

Tuishimi said,
I completely agree with the final paragraph... Alright, it took me a LITTLE longer than 4 hours, but once it becomes 2nd nature to use the windows key combinations or dragging motions it all falls into place and becomes natural.

I don't even use the combos, just the mouse into the corners and works a charm

duddit2 said,

I don't even use the combos, just the mouse into the corners and works a charm

If you have multiple monitors, the keyboard shortcuts make things a lot faster. Even with the sticky corners, it's still very easy to overshoot onto the next screen.

One very nice thing about Metro is that every application shares certain charms. For example, printing has been terribly inconsistent in Win32 applications. In Metro, printing is provided by the system and is therefore consistent across all Metro apps.

TomJones said,
If you have multiple monitors, the keyboard shortcuts make things a lot faster. Even with the sticky corners, it's still very easy to overshoot onto the next screen.

One very nice thing about Metro is that every application shares certain charms. For example, printing has been terribly inconsistent in Win32 applications. In Metro, printing is provided by the system and is therefore consistent across all Metro apps.


Yes I hate the name but love the feature. Charms Win! I love that once you realize that context of the charm is whatever you're in, you're good to go. Be it desktop/start-screen/Store app, it's consistent.

TomJones said,

If you have multiple monitors, the keyboard shortcuts make things a lot faster. Even with the sticky corners, it's still very easy to overshoot onto the next screen.

One very nice thing about Metro is that every application shares certain charms. For example, printing has been terribly inconsistent in Win32 applications. In Metro, printing is provided by the system and is therefore consistent across all Metro apps.

Agreed, I do run multiple monitors at the office and do overshoot quite a bit, so maybe shortcuts are the way forward for me - its just I'm on my laptop far more than desktop and corners work fine.

Also totally agree on the charms front, it took a few days to get used to going to the same place (charms/settings) to see contextual options on a per app basis but its so logical and intuitive (this is what got me I think, its too intuitive and past experience was holding me back). Love the unified search and devices access as well.

Draken said,
yeah, Microsoft's own CTO

Judging by the number of PCs they have, the company appears to be around 2% the size of Microsoft.