U.S. piracy crackdown nets 50th conviction

A U.S. Department of Justice crackdown on online piracy (Operation FastLink) has recorded its 50th felony conviction, the agency announced. Christopher E. Eaves, 31, of Iowa Park, Texas, pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia to one count of conspiracy to commit copyright infringement for his involvement in the Apocalypse Crew, an online organization offering music downloads before their public release. Eaves faces up to five years in prison and a $250,000 fine and is scheduled to be sentenced August 10.

Operation FastLink is an ongoing DOJ crackdown against the organized piracy groups responsible for most of the initial illegal distribution of copyrighted movies, software, games and music on the Internet. Operation FastLink has resulted in more than 120 search warrants executed in 12 countries, the confiscation of hundreds of computers and illegal online distribution hubs, and the removal of more than $50 million worth of content from illegal distribution channels.

News source: InfoWorld

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21 Comments

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This is what capitalism is all about. Instead of tackling bigger issues such as the drug trade and gang violence, why not convict pirates to protect corporate America from a few million bucks of loss revenue?

Now, I do not advocate piracy, but instead of jailing these people and further overcrowding prisons, they should heavily fine them and give them something like 500 hours of community service and ban them from using a PC for a few years or allow them to use it but under surveillance.

ding ding ding! ... we have a winner ;)

this make MUCH more sense than screwing em over in prison where they probably get messed up things done to there rear end etc etc etc.

although the people who pirating the stuff and SELLING it are pretty stupid to start out with... cause when u start selling it is when i believe the major issue comes into play.

It's not "instead" of tackling the "bigger" issues, it's in addition to tackling those issues.

And you're right, throwing these people in prison won't do much for them or for society. I say they work off their debt to society by doing x hours of community service and, of course, paying up some cash.

So you're my cellmate? What are you in for?
I held up a bunch of liquor stores and shot some people. You?
I illegaly uploaded some music.

:P

faraaz said,
So you're my cellmate? What are you in for?
I held up a bunch of liquor stores and shot some people. You?
I illegaly uploaded some music.

:P


Unfortunetly there are people who think the crimes are the same... which is pathetic. Its what society has come to anymore in America. Our solution to everything is how long we can lock the person up for, no matter what they did.

Many times the punishment is even worse than the crime itself. Many of these Judges and Prosecutors need to be locked up for this abuse of our justice system.

The are talking about the major distribitors of copyrighted material. AKA Pirate Bay. Not individuals...Passes MajinDark a pair of glasses.

Mikee4fun said,
The are talking about the major distribitors of copyrighted material. AKA Pirate Bay. Not individuals...Passes MajinDark a pair of glasses.

And who said that the number of distributers is not in the millions? There are six billion people on this earth, and one million of that is 0.0167%...

Turion said,
Yes that is a shame. We are getting back at the man with downloading...

The ironic thing is that the software and record companies have gotten the government to do their dirty work for them -- i.e., by lobbying congress and getting laws that they themselves wrote passed, it's now a felony to distribute their software. And the US Taxpayer pays for this protection. Seems a bit odd to me...

8-n-1 said,

RIAA blah blah blah...

This is not related to that. These are bonafide theives, they're out to make a living selling pirated things. $50 million worth isn't what Mary in the University is downloading.

I prefer this to the RIAA taking the law into their owns hands, can't we all agree on that?