Users, Web Developers Vent Over IE7's First Year

Users of Internet Explorer 7 (IE7) turned a blog post by a Microsoft Corp. program manager into a complaint free-for-all that took the company to task for not following through on browser upgrade promises and alienating Web developers. In the posting to the IE team's blog, Tony Chor, a group program manager, used the passing of IE7's first year to tick off several milestones for the browser, including a claim that its user base recently reached 300 million. "This makes IE7 the second most popular browser after IE6," Chor said in the post. "IE 7 is already #1 in the U.S. and U.K., and we expect IE7 to surpass IE6 worldwide shortly."

Chor also said that IE7's integrated anti-phishing filter stops an estimated 900,000 phish attempts each week, and that the support call volume for Microsoft's browser line is down 20% from a year ago. "This is typically a sign that the product is more stable and has fewer issues than the previous release," Chor said.

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As a developer, I think it's important to push newer versions of IE to the end user as the product becomes more and more compliant in terms of web standards in the upcoming releases of its product. If we linger and develop for anything lower than IE 7, then the problem of having to work around IE 6 and below is surely going to further the delay of us having a headache free solution.

In the article's defense, Gates did make a big deal about the huge 5 year gap between 6 and 7 and that MS would update IE every 9-12 months (product releases, not security fixes). FF releases every few months. IE is so pervasive that you would think, as was mentioned numerous time before 7 was released, that MS would be all over ensuring that IE met everyone's needs: security, compliance, performance, etc.

My company blocks 7 because it's incompatible with so many internal websites. You could argue that these internal sites should be updated, but they work fine in 6, so why move to the non-compliant 7 when it will only mean more work?

IE became so pervasive that it essentially became the standard. So a lot of sites were/are coded to it's particular bug workarounds... & not to the actual standard, e.g. consider this Browser bugs section;

http://www.gtalbot.org/BrowserBugsSection/

1 bug in Mozilla
95 bugs in Internet Explorer 6
34 bugs in Opera 9
95 bugs in Internet Explorer 7
1 bug in Safari 3

[e.g. for IE6]; 6- Constrained link is shrinked by wrapping cell
This bug happens often. The web author creates a site menu based on a table, defines display: block for the link in order to make the link clickable in the whole area of the cell, then uses width: 100% (instead of width: auto). NS 6.2, NS 7.0, NS 7.2, Seamonkey 1.x, K-meleon 1.x, Firefox 1.x, Firefox 2.0, Safari 2.0, Safari 3.0.2, Opera 9.01, Konqueror 3.5.4, Galeon 2.0.1, Epiphany 2.14 all pass this test.

http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2005/07/29/445242.aspx

I want to be clear that our intent is to build a platform that fully complies with the appropriate web standards, in particular CSS 2 ( 2.1, once it’s been Recommended). I think we will make a lot of progress against that in IE7 through our goal of removing the worst painful bugs that make our platform difficult to use for web developers.

I imagine your company would be a lot happier if they knew that their internal sites would function on several browsers rather than just 1 Besides, what would Jeff Jones think of you having to run on an soon to be unsupported browser

ie7 its slow in XP, got serious performance issues there, and the lack of customization the position of stop and reload button i just hate it.

Not in my experience. I'm dual booting XP and Vista and there is absolutely no difference that I can notice. I'm not an IE fandude either, Opera is my 1st choice then Firefox, but IE7 is very close now..I actually use it and for the last 6 years you would never have caught me saying that.

solardog said,
Not in my experience. I'm dual booting XP and Vista and there is absolutely no difference that I can notice. I'm not an IE fandude either, Opera is my 1st choice then Firefox, but IE7 is very close now..I actually use it and for the last 6 years you would never have caught me saying that.
In my experience, IE7 is insanely slow at opening new tabs on every system I've used it on. It's not even close to the speed of Firefox and Opera.

RyanVM said,
In my experience, IE7 is insanely slow at opening new tabs on every system I've used it on. It's not even close to the speed of Firefox and Opera.

Really? Insanely slow? Not even close? I don't know what kind of systems you are using it on but Ive never experienced IE7 performing at such an abysmal level as you describe.

I will get bashed but i honetsly think ie7 is way better then ie6. I dont care if it alienates some developers if it means getting ie more standards compliant. I would rather them do it all in one shot though.

I think most people would agree with you. IE7 blows away any other version of IE completely and thats just a simple fact.

majortom1981 said,
I will get bashed but i honetsly think ie7 is way better then ie6. I dont care if it alienates some developers if it means getting ie more standards compliant. I would rather them do it all in one shot though.

From the development side of things, I rarely get any differences between IE7, FF2, Opera and Safari. It's the rest (namely IE6 and below) that cause the problems.

i use IE7 with IEpro...i am in no need for Firefox with that bundle (IE7 + IE pro)! :-) (dont bash me for telling i am not using firefox ;-) )

So point me to a Microsoft blog that's not overrun by infantile comments from "the other side." There are people out there with nothing better to do than post negative comments on Microsoft blogs. These people need jobs, lives, and probably a good spanking.
PC World uses anonymous comments as if they are meaningful, representative of a large group's views, and can actually be considered credible. More anti-Microsoft senationalism... Will it ever go out of style?

MioTheGreat said,
Yeah, you get that a lot from reading digg too.
With that said, what have we all learned about social media? Other than the fact that it can help to get you page hits that could easily be gotten other ways (not to mention the disaster that happens when the Digg effect takes...effect), it isn't all that useful. I wonder why such sites have grown so popular, honestly. I mean, go hang out with friends in person, not online... If some friends are best kept online (eliminating more personal contact), are they really worth being considered as friends?

And for those of you who are kids still, go outside and play. For those with snow on the ground, snowball fights are dangerous, and that is half of the fun. Hint: mix the snow with some cold water to make it more solid. It stings more that way.

rpgfan said,
And for those of you who are kids still, go outside and play. For those with snow on the ground, snowball fights are dangerous, and that is half of the fun. Hint: mix the snow with some cold water to make it more solid. It stings more that way. ;)

Right! Inflicting pain on others is the best way to express friendship!

Hint: put rocks in your snowballs and you can really inflict some pain! You may even score an occasional fatality! Your “friends” will love you for it!

...or it's a sign that other browsers are taking ie's share of the market. On my website, more people (by at least 2 times) use Firefox than IE.