Via unveils Isaiah x86 architecture

Via Technologies has unveiled details of its newest Isaiah processor architecture. The x86 processor is aimed at Via's next generation of 'Small is Beautiful' devices. Via claimed that the range offers the best performance-per-watt on the market, helping in the production of green, silent and small form-factor desktop PCs.

The chips will also be designed for home media centres, ultra-thin/light notebooks and ultra-mobile PCs. Isaiah has been designed from scratch by Via's US-based processor design subsidiary, Centaur Technology. It is based on 65nm CPU technology and includes a 64-bit micro-architecture, multimedia computation and a new virtual machine architecture.

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the people here that call Via stuff "no-name" ovbiously don't know what they are talking about.

Performance per watt is a simple sum!

Correct, these Via chips arn't as fast as the core2's however they kick their ass with the performance per watt thing.

A typical core2 Duo system will idle at about 80ish watts. If left on 24/7, in the UK this would cost £80/year!!

Now a typical Via system can idle at around 12watts - that's only £12/year!

For the server industry, this is a Godsend! We are all looking for "green pc's" and consider that a simple wind turbine or solar panel would power nearly 2 of these.....

Oh, and these Via chip set clock at around 1.5Ghz...not too shabby for 12watts!!!

VIA have always been considered the underdog next to Intel and AMD, but here they are with a potential class-leader in this field. Hats off to them.

Exactly, they realized they couldnt compete in the desktop space anymore so they went for the embedded segment which they happen to be really good at.

They couldn't compete in the desktop because they never could get the chips to work worth a damn. I sincerely doubt they will be able to do any better in an environment where things HAVE to work 100% of the time for years on end...ahem.

Um... It's not a "no-name" CPU - Via are one of the biggest in embedded/generally small systems.

With regards to the actual story - sounds cool to me!

(Esvandiary said @ #2.1)
Um... It's not a "no-name" CPU - Via are one of the biggest in embedded/generally small systems.

With regards to the actual story - sounds cool to me! :cool:

While not "no name," VIA is not really that present in the embedded industry. In fact, ARM processors made by Samsung, Ti, etc have at least 90% of the market share if not more. VIA is more into the industrial PC, especially with this.

I doubt that it beats mobile and LV/ULV Core 2's performance/watt, especially for general computing tasks like video encoding. It would be pretty amazing if it did beat it, but give me a break. Via beating Intel?

(Thrawn said @ #1)
I doubt that it beats mobile and LV/ULV Core 2's performance/watt, especially for general computing tasks like video encoding. It would be pretty amazing if it did beat it, but give me a break. Via beating Intel?

Except that these chips can be passively cooled; unlike anything out of Intel's factory. This makes them perfect for embedded hardware where active cooling is impractical.

(Thrawn said @ #1)
I doubt that it beats mobile and LV/ULV Core 2's performance/watt, especially for general computing tasks like video encoding. It would be pretty amazing if it did beat it, but give me a break. Via beating Intel?

As Via chips have no need for a fan, and in some cases do not even need a heatsink, overall you get lower processing speed but with much less power usage.. Compare is as a tiger organiser thing (I have one, had it for about 15 years and it died (the batter) about 3 years ago) with a laptop, the organiser can run for 12 years on a single AA battery, the laptop can averagely run for about 4 hours on a 12V Lithium battery, very big difference.

When they make a statement about performance/watt, the cooling solution is irrelevant. In this market you're always comparing chips in the same thermal envelope. I have my doubts.

Except that these chips can be passively cooled; unlike anything out of Intel's factory. This makes them perfect for embedded hardware where active cooling is impractical.

Intel has Celeron 2xx series which can be passively cooled. Look at the D201GLY2 industry board for example, it's only $60 for everything you need except RAM and storage. Compare it to the closes VIA offering at $200 or so. Of course VIA has some cryptography acceleration and some extended DRM stuff, which may appeal to a small subset of people using embedded platforms. Not sure about the Core 2 ULV, but they are probably passively cooled as well considering how little a low clocked Core 2 CPUs TDP is.