VirtualBox 4.3.2

VirtualBox is a general-purpose full virtualizer for x86 hardware. Targeted at server, desktop and embedded use, it is now the only professional-quality virtualization solution that is also Open Source Software.

Some of the features of VirtualBox are:

  • Modularity. VirtualBox has an extremely modular design with well-defined internal programming interfaces and a client/server design. This makes it easy to control it from several interfaces at once: for example, you can start a virtual machine in a typical virtual machine GUI and then control that machine from the command line, or possibly remotely. VirtualBox also comes with a full Software Development Kit: even though it is Open Source Software, you don't have to hack the source to write a new interface for VirtualBox.
  • Virtual machine descriptions in XML. The configuration settings of virtual machines are stored entirely in XML and are independent of the local machines. Virtual machine definitions can therefore easily be ported to other computers.

Download: VirtualBox 4.3.2 | 101 MB (Open Source)
View: VirtualBox Website | Release Notes

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10 Comments

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Pam14160 said,
Windows 8.1 is buggy without being in a VM.

Statistically and technically it is the most stable OS a consumer can currently obtain.

So if you feel Windows 8.1 is buggy, I wonder what you think of Android, OS X, Linux, and iOS that score far behind Windows 8/8.1.

Mobius Enigma said,

Statistically and technically it is the most stable OS a consumer can currently obtain.

So if you feel Windows 8.1 is buggy, I wonder what you think of Android, OS X, Linux, and iOS that score far behind Windows 8/8.1.

And the source of this information is....?????

83 percent of enterprises have Linux currently deployed on servers.

I guess they are all wrong in that they should have chosen Windows 8.1, haha.

DixieNormus said,
83 percent of enterprises have Linux currently deployed on servers.

I guess they are all wrong in that they should have chosen Windows 8.1, haha.

And the ones that don't get hacked are running Windows Server 2012 (aka Windows 8.)

When groups like anonymous are TELLING people they use Linux and other *nix based servers to 'bot' and use for their attacks, people should listen.


Mobius Enigma said,

When groups like anonymous are TELLING people they use Linux and other *nix based servers to 'bot' and use for their attacks, people should listen.

I'm just going to say that it is, for the most part, globally accepted that Linux is a superior platform for servers. Sure, Windows Server 2012 has its perks like being more user-friendly. In terms of security, Open-Source is almost always on top due to the fact that the loopholes can be fixed overnight. Microsoft releases updates less frequently.

Saying that Linux gets hacked more often than Windows is comparable to saying that Cars get in wrecks more than submarines do. Its all a matter of quantity.

I love Microsoft's OS' for my personal computers, however Linux Distro's will be my go-to for servers.

DixieNormus said,

I'm just going to say that it is, for the most part, globally accepted that Linux is a superior platform for servers. Sure, Windows Server 2012 has its perks like being more user-friendly. In terms of security, Open-Source is almost always on top due to the fact that the loopholes can be fixed overnight. Microsoft releases updates less frequently.

Saying that Linux gets hacked more often than Windows is comparable to saying that Cars get in wrecks more than submarines do. Its all a matter of quantity.

I love Microsoft's OS' for my personal computers, however Linux Distro's will be my go-to for servers.

Really?
http://www.neowin.net/news/fox...com-hacked-homepage-defaced

Linux - Apache - Owned...

It isn't about quantity, it is about entry points, fragmentation, accessibility to 'fixes' that don't break things that can be deployed easier, and on and on.

If Windows Server was an 'easy' target there are more than enough servers to target and use for botting. When a group needs 10,000 servers to stage an attack, they are easily 10,000 Windows Servers out there, but not 10,000 servers they can so easily get into.