Vista's Promising Video Upgrades

When it comes to graphics, Microsoft's new operating system may earn its name. Vista promises plenty of great views with upgrades for richly detailed games, as well as better-looking and more-useful desktop apps.

Much of the expected benefit will come from DirectX 10, the first complete rewrite of Microsoft's ubiquitous package of graphics tools, and its move toward what's called a Unified Shader Model. Though games will receive the biggest benefit, Microsoft says that Vista's improved use of graphics resources will allow all applications to add more animation and visual effects without slowing your PC to a crawl. Of course, there's a catch: DX10 must be paired with similarly boosted graphics hardware, meaning you'll have to shell out for a new video card. But you can still benefit from other advances with today's cards.

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News source: PCWorld

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Seems it's the usual, we get ribbed with, 'vista' is more secure, more functional, faster, could even be the final ever operating system y'all ever need.

So spend £350 on the top package to benefit from eveything (which infact is more expensive than a PC) then shell out on new this, new that etc.....

M$ maybe made of money but not everyone else is.

leesmithg said,
Seems it's the usual, we get ribbed with, 'vista' is more secure, more functional, faster, could even be the final ever operating system y'all ever need.

So spend £350 on the top package to benefit from eveything (which infact is more expensive than a PC) then shell out on new this, new that etc.....

M$ maybe made of money but not everyone else is.

M$ with a $ is so last year.

shockz said,
M$ with a $ is so last year.

And.....what exactly is your point? It still holds true, probably more so today than "last year."

meaning you'll have to shell out for a new video card.


Let's actually be a lot MORE CLEAR ON THIS!!!!

For the vast majority of people that have been using their computers for over a year now..maybe more, you'll not only have to shell out for a new video card, but a new motherboard as well. WHY do you ask??? Cuz DirectX 10 features will most likely NEVER be added to an AGP video card. Unless of course, you are one of the rare type that actually bought an AGP/PCI-E motherboard...

So..let's not beat around the bush on this people...if you're going to give facts, stop giving out wiffs of what's real and let people take a bite.

If you're going the DirectX 10 route, you'll need to buy a PCI-E based motherboard...along with (at this time) the Geforce 8000 series cards (though at the time of this post, only two of those are available). Oh....and be prepared for whatever choice you make for a new motherboard, to buy an new CPU....memory....hard drives.....all depends on whether or not the motherboard you purchase still supports the older hardware you have in your machine.


Vista isn't going to be so important that we have to knock down the walls of vendors to get to it....if we haven't learned anything from the release of XP....then we've learned nothing.

I'll be waiting.....for prices to drop, and for bug fixes in SP1 for Vista to be released.

Hate to say this but the computers I have seen here at work for at least the last 2 years have all been PCI-e. As for the price the Nvidia lower cost dx-10 cards are coiming in March/April.

DX10 must be paired with similarly boosted graphics hardware, meaning you'll have to shell out for a new video card. But you can still benefit from other advances with today's cards.

Whcih are what? :suspicious:

Windows Aero, you still will be able to use some programs which require better video card. Let's say with GF4 MX SE I can't use Windows Move Maker, DVD Maker or even lauch few windows games. It require new technologies implanted in GPU and more memory.