Visual Studio 2008 Now 'Generally Available'

Microsoft Tuesday announced that the latest revision of its premier development suite – Visual Studio 2008, or VS2008 for short – is now generally available. Developed under the code name "Orcas," the package was actually completed in mid-November, ahead of schedule, and made available to Microsoft Developer Network (MSDN) subscribers for download at that time. However, this is the first time it is available for volume licensing through resellers and via retail outlets.

"With its inclusion on the January 2008 volume licensing price list, the product is now available to sell and ship to your customers via Open, Select, Enterprise Agreement (EA), and [as] Full Packaged Product," said a blog post by Bruce Kyle, an architect evangelist on the developer and platform evangelism team.

Among the additions in VS2008 is support for Language Integrated Query, or LINQ, which provides the capability to handle query and set operations, such as SQL statements, directly within .NET languages like C# and Visual Basic. VS2008 also adds the ability to write applications that work with multiple versions of the .NET Framework, including versions 2.0, 3.0, and 3.5, and it provides tools for building applications with a similar look and feel to Office 2007's "ribbon" user interface.

Link: Microsft Visual Studio 2008 Web Site
View: Full Article @ Internet News

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Feb. launch set for new Windows Server 2008, Vista SP1 tools

Next Story

Is Halo Wars going cross-platform?

17 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

using professional for VB development and it works great. the compiler is fast, there tons of new features.
it is worth the upgrade if you use it a lot. if not, stick to VS2005.

PS: VS2008 in vista is very good as well. they improved the performance a lot.

Does anyone know for sure if the Pro version of VS08 will support Database projects (.dbp project file extension)? The MS docs aren't clear on this. I got a free Standard edition of VS05 from a MS seminar, and it did not support DBP and could not open these projects when included in an existing solution. The TeamServices edition at work does, but I'm not sure about Pro. We need DBP to suport existing projects, but we'd like to save money and not buy TS if we don't have to.

New MFC controls? Big woop. Inclusion of TR1? Oh boy. TR1 has changes that other languages have had for, oh, I don't know, 5 or 6 years? It is nice that they're adding it, but it reeks of "too little, too late." Hard to get excited about regular expressions being added into the standard library.

VS could do so much to help with development, and it doesn't. For example, why can't it keep the header files automatically synched up with the implementation file? Why doesn't it support automatic refactoring like IntelliJ does? VS used to be a great IDE, but it has fallen behind significantly and they don't seem to care to actually improve to where it speeds up development rather than slow it down...mostly because all the manpower is behind managed code, which is going to save the world, or something.

(Woops, forgot to hit reply to the thread. My bad.)

And unmanaged C++ gets left out in the cold, yet again. No real changes to it since 2005, other than "IntelliSense MIGHT work better now! Go test it for us!"

(antareus said @ #6)
And unmanaged C++ gets left out in the cold, yet again. No real changes to it since 2005, other than "IntelliSense MIGHT work better now! Go test it for us!"

Huh? there was well over 100 changes alone for unmanaged C++ in 2008... unmanaged C++ is one of microsoft's biggest tools in VS

Unmanaged C++ will also get TR-1 standard support with the soon upcoming Visual C++ 2008 Feature Pack. (it's already in public beta, see my link above)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technical_Report_1

And I would also call the new multi core supporting C++ compiler a "real change". It can and tries (where possible) to now compile in parallel! If you have a dual core processor or more, that is.

The improved MFC UI controls are also a separate download only in beta so far:
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details...;displaylang=en
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details...;displaylang=en

I personally had some problems with the project wizards in it, but I guess that's stuff that'll be ironed out for the final release. The MFC controls are based on the BCGControlBar Professional suite by BCGSoft, so this is much of what it is about: http://www.bcgsoft.com/featuretour/bcgcontrolbar-tour.htm (not all features are there, IIRC the grid control, Outlook calendar, and IntelliSense editor, but most of it)

And yes, for .NET ribbon controls, you'd at this point need to purchase something like the BCGControlBar .NET Edition, Codejock's controls, DevXpress, or other suites.

(SloPoke said @ #3)
I'm sticking with VS2005 until vbscript and class asp support is back.

Good luck with that I'd rather have a stable IDE then old ASP support...

(SloPoke said @ #3)
I'm sticking with VS2005 until vbscript and class asp support is back.

ASP "classic" is a dead end. PHP do the same also works on IIS but it's more stable that ASP, is quick and robust. So, there aren't seasons to stick with ASP but to keep backward compatibility.

Awesome, I always assumed the Orcas on MSDN was prerelease..

Well, it wasn't. It's been final on MSDN since in December last year.

And to answer the top poster, no, just to MSDN subscribers, although anyone could download the trial or Express Editions.

(Jugalator said @ #2.1)
And to answer the top poster, no, just to MSDN subscribers, although anyone could download the trial or Express Editions.

I'm not an MSDN subscriber. The 90 days version was there at the day of the release. After 90 days you need to feed it a serial to make it work forever.