Vonage admits it has no workaround

Vonage has acknowledged it has no workaround for technology that was found to infringe Verizon Communications patents and does not know if one is feasible. Vonage has said it was developing workarounds, or other ways of accomplishing the same tasks, to steer clear of the technology that it has been found to be infringing. The company is still working on those techniques, said spokeswoman Brooke Schulz. "While Vonage has been considering design-around options, it does not have a design that can be implemented immediately, if such a design around is even feasible. In fact, current design-around options contemplated could take many months," said an April 6 filing to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit.

On March 23, the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia announced an injunction preventing Vonage from signing up new customers. The appeals court granted Vonage a temporary stay the same day. Vonage argues that a permanent injunction would cause irreparable harm to its business. "Even if Vonage was somehow able to implement a design around and was able to ultimately prevail on appeal, it would have no hope of regaining its lost customers or its lost goodwill, and its loss of revenue would be permanent," the filing said. To make matters worse for Vonage, CEO Michael Snyder left the company last week and founder and Chairman Jeffrey Citron became interim CEO.

News source: InfoWorld

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14 Comments

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Anyone know how this will/could affect U.K. users? I've been with Vonage since August last year, (after Freetalk was bought out buy them), quite happily, and would not like to think of them going under.

If Vonage knowingly infringed upon Verizon's patents, then they deserve what's coming. Too bad they don't have the same image that Apple does, who also stole a trademark and yet still prevailed.

Well Apple stole a name (in my opinion is not grounds for legal action since it is a frigging name) but Vonage stole a technology which is the hard work and innovation of another company. Names, anyone can come up with and no one can say "D'OH, I came up with this name first waaaaaaaaaaa, you can't use it, waaaaaaaa cuz I'm a baby waaaaaaaa" Flipping stupid Cisco...Such immature idiots.

obsolete_power said,
Well Apple stole a name (in my opinion is not grounds for legal action since it is a frigging name) but Vonage stole a technology which is the hard work and innovation of another company. Names, anyone can come up with and no one can say "D'OH, I came up with this name first waaaaaaaaaaa, you can't use it, waaaaaaaa cuz I'm a baby waaaaaaaa" Flipping stupid Cisco...Such immature idiots.

I guess I know which side of the fence you sit on.

shift4 said,

I guess I know which side of the fence you sit on.

The lack of respect for a company with no serious legal basis to challenge another using a trademark registration that they had stopped trading with fence?

obsolete_power said,
Well Apple stole a name (in my opinion is not grounds for legal action since it is a frigging name) but Vonage stole a technology which is the hard work and innovation of another company. Names, anyone can come up with and no one can say "D'OH, I came up with this name first waaaaaaaaaaa, you can't use it, waaaaaaaa cuz I'm a baby waaaaaaaa" Flipping stupid Cisco...Such immature idiots.
So it's perfectly acceptable for me to start up a new company tomorrow called Verizon and sell home phone service? Since, you know, it's just a friggin' name. Honestly, please educate yourself.

drygnfyre said,
So it's perfectly acceptable for me to start up a new company tomorrow called Verizon and sell home phone service? Since, you know, it's just a friggin' name. Honestly, please educate yourself.
Try using a more relevant example before you start insulting other members, only to make yourself look like an idiot.

Here is a better example: Start a computer business tomorrow, called 'Orange Computers" (after all, that is what Apple originally did back in 1976). The word "orange" is a common name, many companies use it in their name. Towing companies and other non-related businesses. Then, over the years, as you develop into other areas of business, you might drop the name "computer" from your business. And here is where you might start getting into rougher seas.

Your use of a manufactured word with only one meaning (Verizon, the existing company), and starting in directly-matching business is disingenuous, don't you think? I'll give you a minute to look up the meaning.

Wow, maybe we all need to a breather :). Here's a little interesting tidbit about Apple and naming problems that is a little older than the Beatles Apple Corps and Cisco iPhone issues (if you already didn't know about it). Originally the Apple Macintosh was suppose to be named "McIntosh" after the actual apple, but there was already an electronics company named McIntosh. So, Apple has found ways around trademark/naming conflicts in the past.

Now, let's all hope that either Vonage finds an acceptable workaround or Verizon grows a soul and allows them to license the technology.

lbmouse said,
Wow, maybe we all need to a breather :).
:O
It is a sure sign that a conversation has gotten out of hand when lbmouse thinks we need to take a breather! :P

Heh, I saw this coming. What's most funny is that I was at Circuit City the other day and while I was in line, I saw them selling a Vonage package to some lady. I thought about going over and letting her know that Vonage was going under, but I decided against it.