Walmart Offers $197.88 Venturer HD DVD Player

The cheap Venturer HD DVD rumours have finally turned to rock solid fact. It may not cost $98.87 but, on the other hand, it does not appear to be a limited time offer. The largest grocery retailer in the United States has yet again showed that it is more than happy to fuel the HD war by beating competitor's prices. It may not carry the Toshiba brand, but the $197.88 Venturer SHD7000 is in stock and ready to go. Many have emphasized that $200 is the magic number for the holidays. For Toshiba's sake, I hope that's true. These additional players may finally get those HD DVD movie sales numbers up. Then again, this is a US-only deal, and HD DVD really needs help in Japan and Europe. It will be quite interesting to see what Toshiba will offer those regions during these holidays and how Sony will respond.

View: $197.88 Venturer HD DVD Player
Link: Forum Discussion (Thanks Boz)

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

AT&T Announces Intention to Withdraw From Pay Phones

Next Story

Microsoft to beef up anti-piracy checks in Vista SP1

9 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

TSThomas said,
HomeTheaterMag;

http://www.hometheatermag.com/gearworks/1106gear/

There Is No Difference Between 1080p and 1080i


You shouldn't make that blanket assertion. If you read the article to which you refer, it concludes with the statement:

Quote - HomeTheaterMag said:
So Don't Worry (Or Only Worry a Little)
Without question, it would be better if all TVs accepted a 1080p input. ...What I hope this article points out is that, if you have a 1080p TV that only accepts 1080i [Italics mine], you're not missing any resolution from the Blu-ray or HD DVD source.

This of course means that if your TV does accept 1080p (which many do now, and most soon will), you will be missing out on resolution from a full HD source [1080p].

I'd also like to point out that Samsung is now coming out with 120Hz refresh 1080p LCDs. And since 120 is evenly divisible by both 24 and 60 (5 and 2 respectively), that should make it much simpler to display the signal from either a normal HD source like HD-DVD, cable, or satellite, or from a computer.

There has been no discernable difference between 1080i and 1080p for most people up until now. But that's now a thing of the past. 1080p is very important now, and nobody in their right mind should buy a new 720p/1080i TV – or HD player! – if they can possibly avoid it.

Octol said,
There has been no discernable difference between 1080i and 1080p for most people up until now. But that's now a thing of the past. 1080p is very important now, and nobody in their right mind should buy a new 720p/1080i TV – or HD player! – if they can possibly avoid it.
There are plenty of reasons, and they're all under 40 inches.

when sony's sales in games go up at double the rate we can start to call sonys hand in this war... for now.... there gaming console... is not a gaming console but more of a media hub... with some game functionality

Funny how you say the PS3 is not a gaming console, but a media hub. While HD DVD supporters say PS3 should not be counted as a Blu-Ray player because it's not a standalone player, but a game console...

Marty2003 said,
Funny how you say the PS3 is not a gaming console, but a media hub. While HD DVD supporters say PS3 should not be counted as a Blu-Ray player because it's not a standalone player, but a game console...

yes, that argument seems to go back and forth, the few people i know irl who bought ps3, bought it as a media hub for playing hd media.

Berserk87 said,

yes, that argument seems to go back and forth, the few people i know irl who bought ps3, bought it as a media hub for playing hd media.

Yip...My cousin who NEVER games got one recently...just for blu-ray.