Welcome to the future: IPv6 launch day is tomorrow

Do we have flying cars, robot servants, jetpacks and time travel machines yet? Nope, not yet... but tomorrow we will be getting a lot more IP addresses when many of the top websites, service providers and equipment manufacturers celebrate World IPv6 Launch Day by transitioning to the IPv6 standard.

As Google points out in its official blog, the implementation of IPv6 will expand the amount of IP addresses capable of being issued out. Under IPv4, the communications protocol that currently directs most traffic on the Internet, about 4.3 billion IP addresses are allowed. Tomorrow, when more companies officially adopt IPv6, up to 2^128 IP addresses will be allowed. This is important given there are over 7 billion people in the world, 2.8 billion of which use some 11 billion Internet-enabled devices. Essentially, the Internet won't need to be upgraded in a similar capacity ever again. 

Last year, the organization which oversees the allocation of IP addresses, the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority, ran out of IP addresses to give. This created a problem, as Internet users would have to begin sharing IP addresses if a new Internet Protocol weren't put into place. Such a situation could have resulted in potentially unsafe Internet usage. Now, however, there will be plenty of IP addresses to go around, with companies and services such as AT&T, Cisco, Comcast, Facebook, Google, Microsoft Bing, Time Warner and others participating in the deployment of IPv6; many have already implemented the new standard, however.

Google's created a handy video, seen below, describing the potential problems that would have occurred if the Internet didn't undergo this advancement.

Source: Google Blog

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osm0sis said,
Didn't IPv6 actually go live like 4 hours ago? Not later today...
Well it was standardised in and has been knocking about since 1999...

Edit: And Facebook have been using it for a while (I know this because I have a tunnel running and Flagfox).

osm0sis said,
Didn't IPv6 actually go live like 4 hours ago? Not later today...

Clarification, since there's been some confusion:
This is a world launch event. Companies are trying to get all their services, products, etc. IPv6 compatible by today. Other companies have transitioned in advance over the past year or so -- a lot of them did so yesterday to meet today's event.

I edited the article to make it clear this is a launch event due to the confusion. Sorry about that.

Now let's hope the working group can iron out the remaining issues with DHCPv6 to help move this along easier. There's still a lot of work left to go.

cork1958 said,

Yeah, what's up with that?

A tech forum that isn't to techie?

It's been explained but basically their colo doesn't yet offer IPv6, so no IPv6 for neowin yet. They didn't want to add tunnels into the mix either.

In further news it's believed that New Zealand will still be using IPv4 until the year 2350 at which point they'll simply upgrade everyone to the newer Psynet when it wont actually cost the ISPs a single cent

My ISP doesn't seem to give a f*** about IPv6... I call them to ask when they will support IPv6, they don't seem to know what I'm talking about. I check their website, it's not mentionned anywhere that they plan to support it. Basically, they seem to be happy with the IPs (v4) they have, and they don't care for the future. I will laugh my ass out when they use the last few IPs they have.

myxomatosis said,
My ISP doesn't seem to give a f*** about IPv6... I call them to ask when they will support IPv6, they don't seem to know what I'm talking about. I check their website, it's not mentionned anywhere that they plan to support it. Basically, they seem to be happy with the IPs (v4) they have, and they don't care for the future. I will laugh my ass out when they use the last few IPs they have.

No you won't because they'll just NAT you from their end and be real derps about it to delay it even further because they don't want to spend money on upgrades.

FuhrerDarqueSyde said,

No you won't because they'll just NAT you from their end and be real derps about it to delay it even further because they don't want to spend money on upgrades.

You mean like 90% of mobile phone operators who don't give out real IPs? Just call up and complain.

Last year, the organization which oversees the allocation of IP addresses, the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority, ran out of IP addresses to give. This created a problem, as Internet users would have to begin sharing IP addresses if a new Internet Protocol weren't put into place. Such a situation would have resulted in the potential breach of private information between Internet users.

That is actual BS, Right there...Who is "sharing" an IP address now!

ChuckFinley said,
"if" a new Internet Protocol weren't put into place. Such a situation would have resulted in the potential breach of private information between Internet users.
That is actual BS, Right there...Who is "sharing" an IP address now!

That big IF right there ^
but is not going to happen, in order to share the same IP, me and my neighbor will have to both use the same router with one WAN interface, me on 192.168.1.0 network and my neighbor on 192.168.10.0 network. Configure access rules where both sides won't have access or see each other for example.
The unsecure way is to just plug your self and neighbor on the same subnet, how to split the bill it's another story lol

No thanks to giving all my internal devices public IP so it can been seen or target., NAT/PAT works great and I will keep my networks that way for internal.

Asrokhel said,
So far, there's not one Canadian company that I know of that's taking part in this yet.
Didn't you know? When referencing 'the world' on a topic it really just means America.

Tomorrow, when more companies officially adopt IPv6, up to 2^128 IP addresses will be allowed.

Allowed? This article is massively misleading. You make it sound like using IPv6 has not been allowed up until today, which is clearly false. My previous ISP (the one I was with a year ago) allocated me a big block of IPv6 addresses which I had allocated to every PC in the house using the DHCP server on my Server 2008 R2 box. It worked great, but was largely useless since there were little to no websites that also used it. I've since moved to Sky Broadband which is one of those ISPs with their heads in the sand, I don't even think their router is capable of routing IPv6 traffic.

TCLN Ryster said,

Allowed? This article is massively misleading. You make it sound like using IPv6 has not been allowed up until today, which is clearly false. My previous ISP (the one I was with a year ago) allocated me a big block of IPv6 addresses which I had allocated to every PC in the house using the DHCP server on my Server 2008 R2 box. It worked great, but was largely useless since there were little to no websites that also used it. I've since moved to Sky Broadband which is one of those ISPs with their heads in the sand, I don't even think their router is capable of routing IPv6 traffic.


It only sounds like that if you completely ignore the phrasing of the sentence. The theoretical limit exists once all companies start implementing IPv6, which is what today is all about -- major companies agreeing to transition, which will cause others to transition.

When your previous ISP existed, you didn't have access to 2^128 IP addresses. That's not how it works. There's allocation issues and other matters. And the word "allowed" is directly in regards to the allocation issues.

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