Western Digital announces 1TB 2.5" Hard-drive

Earlier today, Western Digital announced two additions to their hard-drive range, including a 1 terabyte (1024 Gigabytes) 2.5" Laptop Hard-disk drive and a 750 GB 2.5" Laptop Hard-disk drive.

Western digital was able to expand mobile hard disk space to 1 TB and 750 GB by "A slight increase in overall drive height has driven storage capacity for 2.5-inch form factor drives upwards to a realm once thought to be impossible. "

The hard disks are also claimed to be "whisper silent", and to run very quietly, even during heavy operations.

The product page also states that the laptop hard drive may not fit into all notebook computers as it is "12.5mm high", and to check your notebooks manual before purchasing a drive.

The Western Digital Scorpio Blue 1 TB and 750 GB SATA Hard Drives are available now from Western Digital's online store.

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So rather than two double sided platter there are three?

To everyone else, SI is a standard, live with it, it's Windows that reports the capacity wrong, tell Microsoft how you feel about it.

smithy_dll said,
So rather than two double sided platter there are three?

To everyone else, SI is a standard, live with it, it's Windows that reports the capacity wrong, tell Microsoft how you feel about it.

You obviously haven't read the earlier posts. Hard Drive manufacturers list in SI, under which 1TB = 1000000000000 Bytes. Microsoft lists capacity in JEDEC, under which 1TB = 1099511627776 Bytes. Neither listing is "wrong" as they are both widely accepted industry standards although it is confusing to the average end user because the prefixes are identical. It would be nice if Microsoft moved to IEC standards which would change the prefixes to KiB, MiB, GiB, TiB, etc. for 2 base calculations as the Linux kernel and many Linux apps have already done so.

In reality WDC's hard disks are not exactly 1024 GigaBytes! They claim 1TB = 1,000,000,000,000 bytes instead of 1,099,511,627,776 bytes therefore some of the news content is wrong. When you see the size in computer it is near 930 GiB in (binary)


JunkMail, but that's the case with every HDD manufacturer. I believe that for SSD's they use a base-2 calculation, whereas with HDD's all manufacturers have always used a base-10 calculation for drive capacity. 1 TB (base-10) is actually roughly equal to 0.91 TB (base-2).

Too much space to risk loosing it on the road...

I prefer at the most drives of 500gb or less for mobility because people don't backup that often and having to backup 1TB (or even 750gb) of data won't make then start doing it.

It doesn't say, but it could be great if they start to use 7200rpm instead of 5400rpm on this new drives.

notice how there's no mentioning of heat and rpm speed. i own 2 1 tb wd sata hdd. i have like 5 gb left on each drive. there's just not enough disk space to store all my dvd, music, and game collection. after you format the 1 tb drive you end up with around 960 gb (ntfs). i would buy another 1 tb drive but i'm out of sata connections on my motherboard.

so basically for only $500 ($200 xbox 360 tax) Microsoft could make this available for the 360 and storage should never be an issue ever again. I'd like to see those rumors of a 1tb hard drive for the 360 come true but I can't see it happening at an affordable price.

macrosslover said,
so basically for only $500 ($200 xbox 360 tax) Microsoft could make this available for the 360 and storage should never be an issue ever again. I'd like to see those rumors of a 1tb hard drive for the 360 come true but I can't see it happening at an affordable price.

I was just thinking this lol, wouldn't it be nice to be able to slap that in my 360 :P

If they start counting 1 Kb=1000 bytes and so on then that "1 TB" hard drive will have a capacity of about 700 GB. My hard drive is suppose to be a 250 GB unit but even when it's in raw form without partitions and data, there are 230 Gb available, so most likely we will have to wait more for a real 1 TB drive.

Drive manufacturers use SI prefixes. Under SI 1TB = 1000000000000 bytes (1*1000^4) and as such, the usage of the prefix TB is absolutely correct. Operating system vendors use JEDEC prefixes. JEDEC currently does not have a sanctioned prefix for numbers in the range of one trillion but many os venders follow the JEDEC example for lower value prefixes and assume 1TB to = 1024^4 or 1099511627776 bytes. According to the specs from WD the 1TB drive has 1000204 usable MB. When the conversions are applied, your Operating system will show this drive contains 931.51 GB of usable space.

rafter109 said,
Drive manufacturers use SI prefixes. Under SI 1TB = 1000000000000 bytes (1*1000^4) and as such, the usage of the prefix TB is absolutely correct. Operating system vendors use JEDEC prefixes. JEDEC currently does not have a sanctioned prefix for numbers in the range of one trillion but many os venders follow the JEDEC example for lower value prefixes and assume 1TB to = 1024^4 or 1099511627776 bytes. According to the specs from WD the 1TB drive has 1000204 usable MB. When the conversions are applied, your Operating system will show this drive contains 931.51 GB of usable space.

The thing is these are used for computers and EVERYTHING but hard drives is measured using 2 to some power. RAM and flash chips are two examples that don't "lie" about how much storage they have.

No one is lying about capacity. They are rated in 2 different standardized systems that just happen to use the same prefixes for different meanings. If OS vendors were smart, they would update their prefixes to IEC which would call 1024 bytes a kibibyte (KiB), 1024^2 bytes a mebibyte (MiB). and so forth. It is the OS vendors that are using incorrect nomenclature as the kilo prefix in every other sense means 1000. Blaming this issue on the drive manufacturers is like blaming a pen for writing a book you dislike. Wake up, smell the coffee and get educated on the issue before you go off on some idiotic rant.

rafter109 said,
No one is lying about capacity. They are rated in 2 different standardized systems that just happen to use the same prefixes for different meanings. If OS vendors were smart, they would update their prefixes to IEC which would call 1024 bytes a kibibyte (KiB), 1024^2 bytes a mebibyte (MiB). and so forth. It is the OS vendors that are using incorrect nomenclature as the kilo prefix in every other sense means 1000. Blaming this issue on the drive manufacturers is like blaming a pen for writing a book you dislike. Wake up, smell the coffee and get educated on the issue before you go off on some idiotic rant.

If disc manufacturers want to be picky they just have to say 1 tebi. Then maybe OS creators will follow.

I'm a computer engineer and i've yet to read a book that use kibi, mebi, ... Even the ones about the principles and design of operating systems.

LaP said,
If disc manufacturers want to be picky they just have to say 1 tebi. Then maybe OS creators will follow.

I'm a computer engineer and i've yet to read a book that use kibi, mebi, ... Even the ones about the principles and design of operating systems.

Just because you are a Computer Engineer doesn't mean your knowledge is the be-all end-all. In fact, my 16 year old brother knows more about systems interactions than most certified engineers do.

IEC 80000-13 dictates that when dealing with data quantities one should use KiB, MiB, GiB and so on for 2^10, 2^20, 2^30 respectively. As of 2008, this is also required by NIST guidelines. I fully acknowledge the fact that the spindle drive manufacturers are using outdated standards but they are standards nonetheless. It would also be helpful if the OS Vendors updated their prefixes to the IEC 80000-13 standards to help ease the misunderstandings of the lay user.

rafter109 said,

Just because you are a Computer Engineer doesn't mean your knowledge is the be-all end-all. In fact, my 16 year old brother knows more about systems interactions than most certified engineers do.

IEC 80000-13 dictates that when dealing with data quantities one should use KiB, MiB, GiB and so on for 2^10, 2^20, 2^30 respectively. As of 2008, this is also required by NIST guidelines. I fully acknowledge the fact that the spindle drive manufacturers are using outdated standards but they are standards nonetheless. It would also be helpful if the OS Vendors updated their prefixes to the IEC 80000-13 standards to help ease the misunderstandings of the lay user.

Knowing things doesn't mean you are the best.

There's something called experience you get by getting older and work.

Disc manufacturers will keep using the decimal multiplier and prefix. Even if OS vendors start using the correct binary prefix (along with the already used binary multiplier) the average joe will still be confused by the use of the decimal multiplier by disc manufacturers.

Again i've yet to read a computer book using a decimal multiplier for memory. I did not read all of them but i read a couple of books a year to keep in touch with new technology.

LaP said,

Knowing things doesn't mean you are the best.

There's something called experience you get by getting older and work.

Disc manufacturers will keep using the decimal multiplier and prefix. Even if OS vendors start using the correct binary prefix (along with the already used binary multiplier) the average joe will still be confused by the use of the decimal multiplier by disc manufacturers.

Again i've yet to read a computer book using a decimal multiplier for memory. I did not read all of them but i read a couple of books a year to keep in touch with new technology.

Most technology authors fail to follow standards. Look at W3C vs real world web design.

Think I posted a link to this like 4-5hrs ago in hardware...

and 12.5 MM will fit in MANY laptops, some require a bit of modding, some dont.

Yes, but us with external enclosures won't. As most of them are designed to fit the standard 9.5mm drives. I shall patiently wait for the standard one. Although its very nice to see them at 1TB already.