Western Digital announces 9.5 mm 1 TB Scorpio Blue hard drive

Western Digital has announced earlier today that it has commenced shipments of its updated Scorpio Blue hard drives, their mainstream 2.5" notebook hard drives. The new drive, WD10JPVT, will replace the current 1 TB Scorpio Blue, WD10TPVT, whose thickness comes at 12.5 millimetres. Western Digital now joins its rival Samsung in offering a "slim" 1 terabyte drive for notebook-using consumers.

Rocking 1 terabyte of storage in your laptop has been possible for quite some time now. That is, unless your laptop's hard drive bay (or enclosure) was limited in space to fit a traditional 9.5 mm hard drive. Previously, the move to 1 TB meant that a slight increase to the hard drive's dimensions was needed to accommodate additional hard drive platters.

The Scorpio Blue drive spins at 5400 RPM and features whisper-quiet operation, shock resistance, and low power consumption. Like its desktop hard drives of similar capacity, the drive features WD's Advanced Format technology, or the use of 4 kilobyte sectors.

The new drive carries a MSRP of $139 USD. Further product information may be found here.

Image Credit: Press Release

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I love their motto, 'put your life on it', yeah, I did, and to this date the only drive that's failed with all my ****ing data and been irrecoverable even when sent to a SPECIALIST data recovery company has been a bloody western digital, steer WELL clear.

n_K said,
I love their motto, 'put your life on it', yeah, I did, and to this date the only drive that's failed with all my ****ing data and been irrecoverable even when sent to a SPECIALIST data recovery company has been a bloody western digital, steer WELL clear.

Based on your experience of having one drive fail you're telling people to steer clear? Nonsense. ALL hard drives can fail regardless of who made them. Look at the overall numbers and WD is as reliable as any brand. That must have been a really crappy recovery company by the way.

TRC said,
Based on your experience of having a single drive fail you're telling people to steer clear? Nonsense. ALL hard drives can and do fail regardless of who made them. Also that must have been a pretty crappy recovery company.

Dotco Software, http://www.datarecoverydirect.co.uk - If they're so crap, why're they approved by western digital? They tried changing loads of parts in the hard drive including the drive heads and it still refused to work, it spins up, clicks 3 times and powers down.
Yes, all hard drives can fail, true, I've got old quantiums from 1998 and about 50 mechanincal hard drives in total and out of all that, the only one that was a western digital is also the only one that failed, and it failed within about 8 months of getting it.

n_K said,

They tried changing loads of parts in the hard drive including the drive heads and it still refused to work, it spins up, clicks 3 times and powers down.

Changing parts? They're doing it wrong, or you paid for the super budget service. They're supposed to take it into a clean room, remove the platters and recover the data using a magnetic force microscope. If there was data on the platter it can be recovered, it makes no difference who made the drive.

TRC said,
Changing parts? They're doing it wrong, or you paid for the super budget service. They're supposed to take it into a clean room, remove the platters and recover the data using a magnetic force microscope. If there was data on the platter it can be recovered, it makes no difference who made the drive.

Ah yes, I forgot I'm made of millions so I could pay a few people to spend many months to try and recover data...

While it's true that the only drive that catastrophically failed on me was a Western Digital drive, it was due to a sudden circuit trip that must've caused the drive heads to freak out (it now causes a loud clicking noise when starting up). Also, almost all of my desktop drives have been WD.

Warranty wise, Seagate used to have an edge over WD thanks to their five year warranty for their mainstream hard drives, but now that it's back down to 3 both companies are pretty similar.

Now Maxtor, on the other hand...

n_K said,

Ah yes, I forgot I'm made of millions so I could pay a few people to spend many months to try and recover data...

It doesn't cost millions, and doesn't take months. It's fairly affordable if you have crucial data that needs to be recovered.

As an aside in 20 years I've had one single Western Digital drive fail on me, that's with having built hundreds of systems.

On the other hand I've had a ton of IBM, Hitachi, Seagate, Maxtor, etc drives fail over the years.

I stick with Western Digital for 2 reasons.

1. The reliability that has been demonstrated with hundreds of drives over 2 decades, and
2. The simple way they handled my RMA for the 1 drive that did fail.

It's the same reason I stuck with Built by ATi products for so long, and now stick with Sapphire for their ATi/AMD GPU's. They build the reference hardware for ATi/AMD these days so they are the company that has the highest quality parts.

n_K said,
I love their motto, 'put your life on it', yeah, I did, and to this date the only drive that's failed with all my ****ing data and been irrecoverable even when sent to a SPECIALIST data recovery company has been a bloody western digital, steer WELL clear.

I have had SEVERAL drives fail (ALL Western Digital and ALL within months). Nothing else has. A friend of mine had 3 Western Digital drives fail in succession. All of these failed within weeks of purchase. Upon contacting Western Digital they offered to recover his data if he sent it in (Which they were unable to do upon receiving the drives), and they were also a pain in the a$$ to deal with about these failures...

Based on my experience and that of my friend, and several related (And lengthy) online discussions, I would recommend staying clear of Western Digital as well. Wait for a good brand IMO.

M_Lyons10 said,

I have had SEVERAL drives fail (ALL Western Digital and ALL within months). Nothing else has. A friend of mine had 3 Western Digital drives fail in succession. All of these failed within weeks of purchase. Upon contacting Western Digital they offered to recover his data if he sent it in (Which they were unable to do upon receiving the drives), and they were also a pain in the a$ to deal with about these failures...

Based on my experience and that of my friend, and several related (And lengthy) online discussions, I would recommend staying clear of Western Digital as well. Wait for a good brand IMO.

That's bad luck indeed, for me my smart data shown a few problems, called WD and they send me a replacement drive. If I have seen a Hard drive to fail on me, it was a maxtor one not a WD.

Mountain Dew said,
It doesn't cost millions, and doesn't take months. It's fairly affordable if you have crucial data that needs to be recovered.

It's the same reason I stuck with Built by ATi products for so long, and now stick with Sapphire for their ATi/AMD GPU's. They build the reference hardware for ATi/AMD these days so they are the company that has the highest quality parts.


Quick? You do know how data is stored on hard drives, and how many bits there are per byte, and drives of hundred of gigabytes having an incredible number of bits? Yeh, well unless it's being done by a machine (in which case you might as well just replace parts in the drive and get it running, which is quicker, cheaper and makes sense), or I guess the point of requiring many people to work out many months to physically write down the data still counts.

Also, (ATi/Sapphire) you stick with a company that uses cheap rubbish fans for their cooling that clog up and break pretty quick and often? Christ you really are daft. (And that's from MULTIPLE ATi cards from MULITPLE vendors from over the years, 2 sapphires which they REFUSED RMAs with, a powercolor to which the company didn't even bother replying and a 9600 PRO whose manufacturer I've forgotton).

n_K said,

Also, (ATi/Sapphire) you stick with a company that uses cheap rubbish fans for their cooling that clog up and break pretty quick and often? Christ you really are daft. (And that's from MULTIPLE ATi cards from MULITPLE vendors from over the years, 2 sapphires which they REFUSED RMAs with, a powercolor to which the company didn't even bother replying and a 9600 PRO whose manufacturer I've forgotton).

I haven't used them for a long time but I have to agree with the fan thing. Every single ATI card I ever owned, the fan died within a couple of years. My first one didn't matter since it ran fine without a fan, I just put a normal heat sink on it (Radeon 8500). My last was an X1600 and it fried itself when the fan quit. I haven't bought an ATI (or AMD) card since.

n_K said,
I love their motto, 'put your life on it', yeah, I did, and to this date the only drive that's failed with all my ****ing data and been irrecoverable even when sent to a SPECIALIST data recovery company has been a bloody western digital, steer WELL clear.

Some folks have rotten luck with WD - out of all the WD drives I've owned or recommended, I have had a grand total of *one* (a WD 60 GB ATAPI pre-SE Caviar) ever fail.

It's a shame this is by Western Digital. I've never had any luck with their drives. They always seem to fail on me (And rather quickly at that)... I didn't know Samsung had a 1 TB drive. Something to consider I guess.

If only WD released this earlier. A friend of mine wanted that same 1 TB hard drive in his Macbook Pro, but was told by the shop that 12.5 mm drives wouldn't fit. (Actually, they could according to a few Google searches.)

daniel_rh said,
The only bad thing: the 5400 RPM, too slow, even the 7200RPM is slow for me now that I've tested the SSD drives

You do know that aerial density puts this 5400RPM the higher category than some 7200RPm drives? The 750GB ones are probably not much faster it not LESS than this drive.

Edited by Roger H., Jul 21 2011, 12:11am :

daniel_rh said,
The only bad thing: the 5400 RPM, too slow, even the 7200RPM is slow for me now that I've tested the SSD drives

+1
love my Intel SSD

daniel_rh said,
The only bad thing: the 5400 RPM, too slow, even the 7200RPM is slow for me now that I've tested the SSD drives

Different purpose. Obviously this larger drive is for storage/serving (where network is obviously much slower than the drive(s)). SSD is obviously intended for fast read, e.g. OS/boot disk.
Doubt you would notice a huge difference in speed watching a movie from an SSD compared to a 5400 drive...

bugsbungee said,

Doubt you would notice a huge difference in speed watching a movie from an SSD compared to a 5400 drive...

Maybe on your computer...my movies on my SSD play 50 times faster!

SirEvan said,

Maybe on your computer...my movies on my SSD play 50 times faster!
This seems like a problem... unless it's The Notebook or the first Hulk movie.

daniel_rh said,
The only bad thing: the 5400 RPM, too slow, even the 7200RPM is slow for me now that I've tested the SSD drives

You do realize this is for notebooks/laptops, right? Are there any laptops that use 7200 drives that don't kill a battery within a short time?

Jaybonaut said,

You do realize this is for notebooks/laptops, right? Are there any laptops that use 7200 drives that don't kill a battery within a short time?

If you're referring to 7200 RPM drives in general (regardless of capacity), then sure: I have a ST9500420AS and battery life on this laptop is pretty decent. On battery the system idles at 11 W (as low as 6-7 W if the lid is shut).

SirEvan said,

Maybe on your computer...my movies on my SSD play 50 times faster!
Hope that's a joke or typo. SSD's won't affect the running time of movies...

Xero said,
Maybe on your computer...my movies on my SSD play 50 times faster!

why would you want to watch movies 50 times faster??????? =S