Editorial

What has me excited, disappointed and curious about Xbox One

The Xbox One will have an interesting E3 if reaction to its Tuesday event was any indication

When Microsoft announced the Xbox One on Tuesday, the potential of a console pairing games, televisions and movies in a nearly seamless manner instantly excited me. While I'm certainly excited for Xbox One, however, there were things I was disappointed or curious about.

Microsoft may have put on a great presentation, but there's still a lot of question marks about the Xbox One and what it's truly capable of – there may even be more questions than there were answers, as much of the supposed announcements at the event had already been leaked months in advance. When the console was being announced, I was excited about everything presented. Following the presentation, however, media outlets at the event asked important questions that should give gamers pause about their excitement.

Excited

Television integration at long last
I'm a big fan of quality television programs (if you're reading this and you don't like "House" or "Scrubs" you should resign yourself to the fact that we'll never be friends), and I'm also a big fan of quality gaming experiences. Combining the two with Xbox One gives Microsoft's upcoming console a leg up in the battle for the living room, given the lack of such entertainment services in competing consoles.

Unfortunately for Microsoft, gamers all across the world are a group quick to judge. If a console's announcement doesn't focus exclusively on gaming, expect a major complaining session from a vocal group of users. Perhaps they don't care about entertainment offerings beyond the variety where you shoot Russians in the face or loot dungeons, but I do, and I'd wager the majority of Microsoft's users do as well, even if they aren't as vocal.

I'm extremely happy with additional entertainment capabilities.

The One Guide used not only to view television listings but also video-on-demand and trending shows is a nice way to keep abreast of what's going on in television, and interactive applications and features that work alongside content is equally fantastic. There are plenty of gamers who will continue to whine, scream, kick and moan when a console dares do anything beyond play games (especially when a company actually has the audacity to emphasize those features), but I don't really give a damn – I'm extremely happy with additional entertainment capabilities.

Exclusive games
Phil Spencer, corporate vice president of Microsoft Game Studios, claimed Xbox One will launch 15 original games within a year of its release, eight of which will be new franchises. Two of those games were revealed at the event, Remedy's Quantum Break and Microsoft-owned Turn 10 Studios' Forza Motorsport 5. Remedy has yet to make a bad game as far as I'm concerned, and Microsoft's Forza series has proven its quality over the years. 

Another of the new franchises will be Crytek's Ryse, a game I've been anticipating since it was announced for the Xbox 360 two years ago and later became a current-generation Kinect title. With the revelation that the next-generation Kinect will feature more precise tracking, lower latency and work with a Xbox One controller, Ryse could end up being a killer game. A presenter at the conference even seemed to allude to the game when he said users could move their controller to bring up a shield – certainly sounds like a hack-and-slash game set during the Roman Empire's dominance to me.

Spencer said more exclusive titles are in development for an Xbox platform than at any previous time, an amazing fact when considering that Microsoft has 22 game development studios that work with a variety of platforms but have focused on the Xbox 360 and Kinect in recent years.

Three operating systems and multitasking
​Hallelujah! Perhaps the biggest pain in the ass regarding the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 is that neither console features an interface that is particularly fun to navigate around. Sony showed its own multitasking solution with the PlayStation 4, but Microsoft's taking on the problem in a more unique manner.


Multitasking and snap view will be handy features when using Xbox One.

By using three operating systems – an Xbox operating system for games, an operating system based on the Windows kernel for applications and a third that will be used to easily switch between the two environments – Microsoft is hoping to take advantage of its core strengths. Users will be able to snap applications or services to separate sides of their televisions, much like Windows 8, making for a pain-free experience when you want to play a game and keep up with the score of a sporting event, for instance.

The possibilities of what apps will be available for the console is nearly limitless, given the Windows kernel. Yes, developers will have to remake apps in some fashion, but it's likely Microsoft has considered that and will make the process relatively painless. Having apps such as Skype available will help Microsoft achieve its dream of the true all-in-one living room device.

Disappointed

Indie development
When I started writing this article, nothing had been announced about indie development on the Xbox One. I thought it was a questionable move, but I decided to wait to publish this article since there was some conflicting information being reported about various aspects of the console. In recent days, however, Microsoft essentially made it clear why it didn't announce anything: because there was nothing positive to announce.

Ever since Microsoft launched indie development for the Xbox 360, a large number of those developers have rallied against how the company treats them. Some have released statistics illustrating as much. But while Sony is placing an emphasis on indie development with its new console, Microsoft appears to be taking the opposite route – odd, considering you'd think independently released apps should be at home on a system that uses the Windows kernel.

Perhaps a bigger issue is the curation of the Xbox One game marketplace.

Forcing indie developers to work with publishers it not a good solution. Publishers – Microsoft included – aren't going to waste resources unless there's a clear benefit for them, which not all indie developers can provide. That doesn't mean the platform should be unavailable to them. Yes, it's Microsoft ecosystem to do as it pleases, but a bad decision is a bad decision. Now, indie development is effectively the same as Xbox Live Arcade development for the Xbox 360, though Microsoft is scrapping the Arcade and Indie terms altogether for the Xbox One.

Perhaps a bigger issue is the curation of the Xbox One game marketplace. Indie developers already claim it's a pain in the ass to find their games, so how easy will it be on the Xbox One? If Microsoft's the one determining how games are showcased, it's unlikely the smaller developers will get the same showcases afforded to multimillion-dollar games. And in the case of listings, few people are going to seek out indie games when sorting alphabetically or by genre.

What Microsoft's revealed thus far about indie development for the Xbox One isn't good. It's possible a big announcement is being saved for Microsoft's Build Developer Conference next month, but you'd think it would quell any fears right off the bat and show some signs of support for indie developers.

Bundling and requiring Kinect
I'm not a hater of the current-generation Kinect, nor am I obsessed with the motion-tracking sensor, but I do think people should have the choice of whether or not they they have to purchase and plug in the sensor. As it stands, Microsoft refuses to allow users that choice.

The next-generation Kinect sensor comes bundled with Xbox One and is also required to run the console, as it has to be plugged in for the console to work, even though it's essentially unnecessary for those who don't want to use it. Even if aspects of the console require Kinect to work, it's hard to imagine Microsoft being unable to make it so Xbox One could operate without the sensor. So why require it? Most likely because Microsoft wants all its users and developers playing with an exclusive technology, and requiring all Xbox One owners to use the device means developers will practically have to support it. That's a nice idea in theory, but it could also hurt sales among people who don't want a Kinect.


Will Kinect finally be accepted by the hardcore gaming community? Right now that doesn't appear likely.

Not everyone is going to want to use the new Kinect, just like not everyone wants a touchscreen on their Windows desktop. As it stands, Kinect is a secondary input option. That's not to say there aren't good Kinect-exclusive games, but the majority of Xbox games are best played with a controller. The hardcore gaming community has already turned its nose up in disgust at the current Kinect, but it's possible the dramatically reduced latency and ability to use the motion sensor in conjunction with a controller will change some minds. At the same time, however, if the standard controller is capable of controlling everything on the console, why not offer a less expensive version of the Xbox One without Kinect?

I've actually turned off my current-generation Kinect not because I don't like it, but because it's such a pain in the ass when I'm using entertainment programs such as Netflix. The sensor has a knack for always assuming that I want to interact with it, no matter where my hands are or what I say. I can be typing on my laptop while sitting on the couch, and it will somehow assume I want to use the motion controls. Even if the next-generation Kinect is more accurate, it won't matter if these nagging habits aren't fixed.

No confirmation on DRM, Internet requirements
Much has been made about the supposed "always-on" requirement of Microsoft's next-generation Xbox, and though Microsoft said it won't require a persistent Internet connection, it hasn't officially provided much details beyond that. What exactly does Microsoft mean when saying, "No, it does not have to be always connected, but Xbox One does require a connection to the Internet." Does that mean it has to be connected every month? Every day? We don't know.

When I was in college, I lived in a dorm that had free wireless service and no ethernet wall jacks, yet consoles were barred from connecting to the network. If it would have been available when I was in college and had even a connect-once-a-month requirement, I wouldn't have purchased an Xbox One as it would have been essentially worthless. This obviously isn't the most commonplace situation, but it's not hard to imagine a decent chunk of people facing similar problems.

Does that mean it has to be connected every month? Every day? We don't know.

Another matter is how Microsoft will handle game sales. According to Microsoft, codes will be sold with each game, and users can then install games to their hard drives (a requirement) and not worry about inserting the disc again as the game will be playable by anyone on the console as well as the Xbox account that installed it, regardless of what console that account is used on. That's great in theory, but it also effectively kills the joy of lending a game to a friend, and the used game market will change as well. That's why Microsoft said it is "designing Xbox One to enable customers to trade in and resell games," but what exactly that entails also isn't being said. And what about game rentals? We still don't know.

Kotaku recently reported that Phil Harrison, corporate vice president at Microsoft's Interactive Entertainment Business, said he thought the console had a 24-hour offline limit, meaning users have to connect at least once every 24 hours. He also apparently said that games are associated with a user's console and Xbox Live profile and if a game was loaned to a friend, he or she would have to pay full price for it (in the case of a new game, at least). Microsoft, on the other hand, has said it's not confirming either detail at this time.

This surely isn't the last time these topics will be brought up. How Microsoft responds to them at the E3 gaming conference next month could very well dictate the success of Xbox One among hardcore gamers.

Curious

Television content deals
Prior to the leaked information that Microsoft would pair its new Xbox console with set-top boxes through the use of an HDMI input port and IR blaster, it was rumored that the company sought to make deals with content providers to provide a la carte methods of subscription. With the embarrassment of the television industry as it is in the U.S., however, Microsoft likely got pushed around and quickly realized it wasn't feasible to work with companies that demand low-quality channels be bundled with their flagship counterparts.


Xbox One will have TV integration, but cord-cutters will have to look elsewhere – at least if they live in the U.S.

Simply put, the U.S. has lagged behind the rest of the world in terms of IPTV services, and the cable and satellite industries have their hands tied by content providers that sell their channels in bundles. Microsoft had a chance to change all that, but even one of the most powerful companies in the world can't stop an entire industry bent on screwing over consumers. 

Users outside of Microsoft's home country may see the true culmination of Microsoft's dream all-in-one device, as the console will work seamlessly with IPTV in regions that support it. For U.S. customers, however, it's unclear what options Microsoft will provide to those that want to cut the cord and rely on over-the-air signals. Microsoft says it wants to enable live TV on Xbox One throughout the world, "whether that’s television service providers, over the air or over the Internet, or HDMI-in via a set top box (as is the case with many providers in the U.S.)," but the details of how it will achieve that for non-subscription customers in the U.S. is murky.

The Xbox One has neither a coaxial cable input nor TV tuner, so those who rely on over-the-air broadcasts will be out of luck unless Microsoft has another trick up its sleeve.

What will Microsoft show at E3
Yes, Microsoft said 15 exclusive games that will launch alongside the console later this year, but only two exclusives were revealed at the Tuesday event. Sony, by comparison, revealed five exclusive games at its PlayStation 4 announcement event on Feb. 20, though several multiplatform games were also mentioned or shown at the event.

Microsoft will have to show that games aren't considered an afterthought.

It's not really a surprise that more games weren't revealed, as Microsoft previously stated it would use E3 as its platform to showcase games. Microsoft wanted to use its Xbox One reveal event as a way to showcase the full capabilities of the console – and there certainly were plenty of relevant features to mention. Still, it's also easy to understand why gamers are upset more games weren't revealed. Microsoft is moving the Xbox hardware away from being classified solely as a gaming console and moving it toward the all-in-one moniker, and if it wants gamers to respect that, it will have to show that games aren't considered an afterthought.

The only way Microsoft was going to woo the hardcore gaming community was if it showed nothing but next-generation games for an entire hour. That clearly wasn't going to happen given Microsoft's focus with the console, but it could win that audience back if it has a strong E3 and clarifies what its DRM policy will end up being for the Xbox One. If Microsoft manages to show nearly nothing but games at E3, gamers will certainly forget any bad taste they had when the Xbox One was first announced.

Where are the ads
Microsoft's revised the dashboard of the Xbox 360 several times, and each of those updates typically come with new features and services. Another thing they typically come with, however, is more advertisements.

The first Xbox 360 featured no ads, but subsequent versions have slowly found ways to bring in more and more ads at the forefront of the dashboard. Microsoft has even actively recruited new ways of advertising on the Xbox 360 dashboard with its NUads, capable of interacting with users through Kinect. The company has called NUads part of advertising's future, though it insists no information will ever be stored from interactive advertisements.

It's somewhat odd, then, that Xbox One's dashboard was bereft of any advertisements whatsoever. Yes, there was a "recommended" section, but no actual advertisements. It's possible Microsoft simply moved all the ads inside apps, similar to how its apps for Windows 8 and Windows RT feature ads, but it seems unlikely there will be no advertisements at all, especially given how successful the company has been getting advertising partners.

The Xbox One dashboard is a thing of beauty in how simple and elegant it looks – it could very well be the best implementation of Microsoft's Metro design language yet. I'm sure Microsoft knows that, but I'm equally sure Microsoft wants to squeeze every penny possible out of the Xbox brand, and that may include keeping advertisements in the new console – the only question is where they'll go.

Images via Microsoft

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In stark contrast, the one aspect of the Xbox One that I have zero interest in is the gaming. I have a MUCH more powerful gaming machine in the form of my PC. I tried console gaming and I HATE it. Controllers are lame compared to a keyboard/mouse combination, as far as I'm concerned. The Kinect is one of the primary reasons this new console has my attention. That, and the way Microsoft is leveraging three operating systems to make response of service requests virtually instantaneous. If this machine works with my Dish Network service, then the ability to control all of my multimedia via voice and gesture is gold for me. I want a home, and environment that I can simply walk into and use voice and gesture to make things happen. Apps on my TV or blueray player are nice, but they are painfully slow. I want my media experience fast and fluid. So far, Xbox One seems to be bringing that. Integrating that machine with the rest of my nearly exclusively Windows 8 / Windows Phone ecosystem is attractive. I couldn't care less about the gaming aspect of it.

I was thinking of getting an Xbox as an entertainment device mostly but 1) I can care less about Kinect now or in 4 years; unless it can read my mind then I have no interest in even trying it out; I'm not going to be dancing around like a clown in front of my TV even if they paid me to 2) Netflix - why the hell do I need to buy some Gold subscription just to get Netflix? The TV stuff is what really got me excited but the drawbacks seem to outweigh to positives for me...

I never bought 360 and always had a PS3. I thought current kinect was underpowered and gimiky. But I watched the kinect demo 2.0 and watched the milo demo from 2009 I think they gotten to a place where this may work. Think something like Siri + kinect + RPG. It would make the game it totally more immersive. I am hopeful will see something like this at e3.

I know a couple of people that are weary of Kinect, like it's looking into their soul and stealing their thoughts. I mean, sure, it's gotta be plugged in but just plug it in and never talk to it or play games with it. I like mine, personally. Kids love this thing, too. It's like having a super smart web cam attached to your Xbox. I watched a video on the data it can gather as far as movements, emotions, people in the room, etc and it was really amazing.

Kinect will be used as Nielsen-like device along with the TV viewing so the XBOX can better track what people are watching, how intense they are watching and how emotionally engaged they are. This sill support TV, Movies and advertisements. Nielsen-ratings do not track well across all forms of media and Microsoft is looking to dominate this area (and access millions of more data-sets than Nielsen can) while elevating engagement based on biometric feedback.

I'm not a hater of the current-generation Kinect, nor am I obsessed with the motion-tracking sensor, but I do think people should have the choice of whether or not they want to use it. As it stands, Microsoft refuses to allow users that choice.

An OK article apart from the above. People keep spouting this, and it simply isn't true.

The only think that Microsoft are mandating is that you have the Kinect plugged in. They are not forcing you to use it.

TCLN Ryster said,

An OK article apart from the above. People keep spouting this, and it simply isn't true.

The only think that Microsoft are mandating is that you have the Kinect plugged in. They are not forcing you to use it.


OK, it's an argument over semantics. In my mind, being required to have the device plugged in is tantamount to being required to use it, because there's no option to even run the console without it. I'll edit the editorial to clarify that you're required to connect it and not necessarily use it.

Ok good. However I will say this... your recent edit states that "it's unnecessary for those who don't want to use it. ". At this stage we do not know this.

As the new Kinect has dedicated processing hardware onboard, it might be possible to offload some non-time sensitive computations to it to free up the APU for other real-time processing.

There's also the "passive" functions of Kinect that don't require you to "use it" per se for gestures and voice control. Such as the automatic sign-in just by recognising you. In addition, Kinect's new HD camera will provide a kick-arse Skype experience, as well as voice comms to other players in games without the need for a headset. The first Kinect had trouble hearing me over the volume of the game, I'm assuming they've gone a long way to resolving this with Kinect One.

Why exclusive games are in the Excited section? I figure, they'll help sell the thing and Kinect is, in fact, very awesome - they'll definitely have good Kinect integration (guess Head Tracking will be finally done right). Is that what you mean? Otherwise... nah...

There are more exclusives in development for Xbox One than there were at any single point in Xbox 360's development history. That's pretty exciting in my eyes.

That depends on what those exclusives are. The PC arguably has more exclusives to it than all the other consoles. However, how good those games may actually be is a whole 'nother story.

About requiring connect -- are you also upset that you have to use multi-touch with your iPad or a Mouse with your computer. I mean that is total weak-sauce.

Also about Indie development, this was said from Major Nelson at Xbox.com

We're working on a plan for (sic). Xbox One is a platform that allows all creators, including those who work on games and apps, regardless of team size, funding, biz model, etc. to be a part of the future of Xbox One."

Also the DRM is pretty fair and I don't see a problem with it. Yes, they should have worked all this out before launch and they were behind in the console.

"Bundling and requiring Kinect"

okay, trust me when I say this, but Kinect is genuinely awesome. Kinect might just become the Xbox's key advantage over the PS3. Kinect is not only used for voice recognition, Skype, and Dance Central. We've seen some really awesome applications of Kinect in Splinter Cell: Blacklist. Kinect is nothing but probably the single most amazing piece of technology today.

I'll be that guy and say that so far I've yet to see a game were the Kinect made me feel it was worth it. I did enjoy the Tennis game a bit but that's not enough

I don't game much with Kinect but I like the voice commands when a) can't find the remote or b) batteries in the remote are dead. Kids love the hell out of some Kinect, too.

and I wanted Windows Media Center integration. Have an eSATA port to add HDD's to record TV, with a infinitv 4, so PIP while watching tv. More than 1 tuner.

That was my wish list.

For me as an indian the TV integration is pretty much useless. We dont have HULU, Spotify etc so all that TV integration is never going to happen here. I was out to buy a console but cancelled my plans since these new consoles were coming out. Looking at how the xbox is I am waiting for PS4 to reveal theirs.

the tv integration is just plugging in an HDMI enabled cable box into the back of the xbox and having the xbox take over as the overlay

I'm excited and eager to use the new features in XONE. I usually wait for about six months before I buy a new console, but the new features might make me break that tradition. I'll be able to get rid of the BD player and HTPC in our living room. All we will have are the 7.1 A/V receiver and XONE.

When you look at what's under the Xbox's hood, it's clear Microsoft is envisioning Xbox to eventually be a service you can download rather than a single box you walk into a store and buy.

I wish that were true.

I'd love it if MS combined WMC with Xbox as a service so the two could be combined to create a first class HTPC. It's sad to see WMC development stalling on the PC but evolving on the Xbox One and it also seems silly to have to buy an Xbox when I already have a PC sitting under my TV.

I'm sure some at Microsoft wanted to invest resources into a WMC-like experience of recording TV shows on the Xbox One, but honestly, that's pretty backward looking when we absolutely know the future of TV will be delivered over the Internet and over-the-top services like Hulu and Netflix.

AWilliams87 said,
When you look at what's under the Xbox's hood, it's clear Microsoft is envisioning Xbox to eventually be a service you can download rather than a single box you walk into a store and buy.
If that were true the storage would have been at least 1TB. At 500GB you could store less than 10 games if they were using the full bluray

First off, I don't see many One games filling up Blu-ray discs on the constant. I see 20GBs as the norm for most next-gen multiplat games. Sure their will be your exclusive blockbusters that want to go all out and be 50GBs, but honestly the thing that fills up discs the most is uncompressed 1080p video. If you study all the game this gen that filled up a 50GB Blu-ray on the PS3, you will find that they have a lot in common...they all relied on movies as their cut scenes instead of going in-game. Plus this is where Azure is going to come into play heavily on The One...being able to offload those movies to stream from the cloud instead of off the disc/HDD to free up even more room for actual game content.

Rudy,
If that were true the storage would have been at least 1TB. At 500GB you could store less than 10 games if they were using the full bluray

I'm talking about the Xbox OS itself as a service you download and run on different devices, not simply as a standalone box. I don't know what you thought I meant by your reply.

If you mean through the utilization of cloud computing to power said content and stream it to your displays, I don't see that happening for a while. I mean, as much as I love SkyDrive and some of the various Microsoft apps, fact of the matter is that even those services have left me high and dry more often than I would like.

With that said, I look at the disaster of a launch that was Diablo 3, Simcity, and even the continual problems we see with always-online DRM (as that would be what it would become), where you end up in a queue to watch a television show or to play the new Halo game.

That is a world I do not want to live in, and to be quite frank, hope to never see.

(I can agree on the conveniences and wonderful nature of how awesome such a thing COULD be, but when you look at the sort of companies that would behind such technology, I have little faith)

alwaysonacoffebreak said,
If you mean through the utilization of cloud computing to power said content and stream it to your displays, I don't see that happening for a while. I mean, as much as I love SkyDrive and some of the various Microsoft apps, fact of the matter is that even those services have left me high and dry more often than I would like.

With that said, I look at the disaster of a launch that was Diablo 3, Simcity, and even the continual problems we see with always-online DRM (as that would be what it would become), where you end up in a queue to watch a television show or to play the new Halo game.

That is a world I do not want to live in, and to be quite frank, hope to never see.

(I can agree on the conveniences and wonderful nature of how awesome such a thing COULD be, but when you look at the sort of companies that would behind such technology, I have little faith)


No. This isn't what I mean.

The Xbox OS is virtualized and managed by a type 1 hypervisor in the new Xbox. This is a similar model used in windows server. If Microsoft really wanted, I can't see why they couldn't implement this same model in future versions of Windows for example. Buying an Xbox may be as simple as downloading the Xbox OS itself onto your Dell pc.

I'm mainly excited. Curious about some of the new features of course,
but I can't think of anything disappointing about XBOX ONE.

I'm eventually going to get both consoles anyways, it's just which I'm going to get first that I have to decide over.

On the ps4 side, infamous and knack look really great, and then on the x1 side, I'm a huge fan of forza and remedy's projects. Of course, we'll see more at e3 and that's just under 3 weeks away. Personally, I'm just more a fan of microsoft's exclusives (Halo, Fable, RARE's titles, Crackdown, etc.) than Sony's line-ups, so that will probably be the deciding factor for me.

What's funny of the many MS Haters are that they are the same that were claiming that OnLive was going to take the market over and that consoles were dead. Funny now that just a rumor of Always Online comes up they are taking out their hate against MS. I personally MS should give the options and shouldn't require an always on internet connection but it's just gullible to see how the haters twist and make up things just to trash MS.

Gullible? It's pathetic and it's even more pathetic that masses believe those tards and propagate made up stories without checking facts.

Sony hasn't given anyone a clear answer either and yet they are being praised like God. Yoshida has been avoiding giving clear answers about many questions after the 20th of February as well.

MS have already said they will give more information at E3 and following, Its just retards that seem to want to make up **** as we go along. Wait for MS to make all official before blabbing ****.

The questioning of having Kinect bundle is quite funny. This is how technology moves and the innovation MS is bringing to the console is something that people should be given to experience instead of choosing to let them choose because we all know people don't know they need it until they use it. I think that bundling of Kinect is the way to go otherwise MS would have to be catering to those to have it and those that don't have Kinnect which would slow things down. Much of the other things are premature in most aspect and we should not be jumping into speculation. Editorials should bring insight not lack of it.

People are questioning it because not everyone likes it. The current Kinect failed pretty badly at showing why it should be "required". Personally given the choice between an Xbox One with or without the Kinect I would pick without unless the difference is less than $40 (which is wouldn't based on the current Kinect prices)

Rudy said,
People are questioning it because not everyone likes it. The current Kinect failed pretty badly at showing why it should be "required". Personally given the choice between an Xbox One with or without the Kinect I would pick without unless the difference is less than $40 (which is wouldn't based on the current Kinect prices)

to get the full experience of the product you need Kinnect and to move innovation forward you need Kinnect. This is the reason MS Is offering more than game and this will drive innovation forward in the living room.

We need innovation in content delivery more than me moving body parts around to change channels. I know that there is more to Kinect than that, but requiring a Gold subscription to have Netflix is a joke, for example. Sure most people might get Gold anyway, but I do my gaming on PC.

I have an Xbox for the kids and they don't even use the Kinect. Once the initial "WOW factor" wore off, they never even bother with it. Some people won't even bother because of the price. If they sold a version without the Kinect, at least some people would buy it. Then they might buy the Kinect later. As it stands right now, I won't be getting one because of what the price is going to be.

What could you be disappointed about. Seriously! It does gaming and whole lot more than you could ask for, all in one devices! Flubber!