What will Kansas City do with 1 Gbps Internet from Google?

What would you do if you suddenly could get access to speeds of up to 1 Gbps for your home or business Internet connection? That's the question that a lot of citizens in both Kansas City, Kansas and neighboring Kansas City, Missouri are asking as Google ramps up the construction of their planned fiber Internet network. The service is expected to launch in at least part of those two metro areas sometime in 2012.

The Kansas City Star web site reports that some businesses and organizations are trying to figure out how to take advantage of this super-fast Internet service in order to attract more businesses and services. Some have suggested that the network could generate more videoconferencing businesses or perhaps provide for super-fast streaming of concerts and entertainment events.

One big problem is that so far Google hasn't said how much it would charge Kansas City residents to access the 1 Gbps network. If the price is too expensive it could keep some from paying to use the service. However, if the price is competitive with the normal broadband Internet access from other companies, say $50 a month, that could spur individuals and businesses to sign up.

In the end, very few people here in the US have access to those kinds of Internet speeds. Placing that amount of bandwidth in a large metro area like Kansas City could lead to that Midwest city becoming a huge center for high tech and computing companies if the price is right. And, if this experiment is successful you can bet that other big cities in the US will look into offering similar networks in order to spur high tech growth.

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28 Comments

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I wonder if they're really goign to be able to do much. Since this is the first area to be recieving this service I'm sure its going to be monitored quite closely. So they will know who the heavy up/down loaders will be... ehh..

I can't source, but I remember reading something by Google stating they wanted to stay in the base range of current ISPs (and work with other ISPs for these speeds). If this is still true, then that's around $40/m for 1Gb/s UP/DOWN. Shhiiit. I wonder though, when will these other cities that "signed up" get their time to shine too? My city is one of those and I'd love me something better than Comcast.

Fastet connection I'm able to get is 400/400... it'll cost me closer to 8.000 euros/year.... gotta movie I think

The biggest issue is if websites will have the output to be able to handle that speed. In most cases probably not which is where torrents and other alternative methods will come into play.

shinji257 said,
The biggest issue is if websites will have the output to be able to handle that speed. In most cases probably not which is where torrents and other alternative methods will come into play.

when you D/L from fileshare sites like mediafire and megaupload they limit the transfer rate unless you buy premium anyways.

same as with regular DDL servers. They do this to not break thier cap or burst too often

I really hope that Google just does their own thing and doesn't let the ISP's place data caps on their customers. What good is faster speed, when the amount of data is capped? This is also the same reason why I'll never sign up for a carrier offering 4G data speeds until that data is unlimited. As a consumer, I simply don't want to have to worry about how much data I'm consuming, and later on be penalized.

I work for a UK telecoms firm, we charge businesses roughly £53,000 p/a for a 1Gbps WAN service... good luck Google with no infrastructure.

TheHub said,
I work for a UK telecoms firm, we charge businesses roughly £53,000 p/a for a 1Gbps WAN service... good luck Google with no infrastructure.

Everything is more expensive in the UK...

1080p 50Mbps Blu-Ray Pr0n of-course. I mean, "♪ The internet is for porn ♫" right?

All I gotta say is damn, will someone please do this where I live, somebody please take me money!!!

We will need to see a lot of things first. Price is important, but more important will be the real speed capacity of the network. Can Google deliver 1gigabit to each node? Also, how long is Google going to keep this up?

Billmaster said,
Really Going to have a hard time if that put a 250GB cap on it like my comcast cable!

i have gone over it few times, but nothing happened. unless you live in big city or nearby to big city i guess that's problem. if not i dont think you cannot be in trouble.