WiFox software could improve Wi-Fi by up to 700 percent

Developers at the North Carolina State University have developed software that could improve Wi-Fi performance substantially depending on the weight on the network. The piece of software is called WiFox, and it works by diverting traffic away from clogged Wi-Fi channels allowing for improved data flow and maximum Wi-Fi performance.

Although the idea of it seems a little farfetched, the developers insist that WiFox does work. In a test, the team was able to obtain results that proved that WiFox improved the speed of the Wi-Fi connection they were testing between 400 and 700 percent. It should also be noted that with the more people trying to connect through a single channel, the quicker the software reacts to the congestion.

Additionally, we know that a project proposal for WiFox’s implementation will be discussed at the ACM CoNEXT 2012 conference in Nice, France, between the 10th and 13th of December, so we’ll have more to share around that time.

The best and most important fact about this piece of software, is that should the software exit its final testing phase and the proposal is accepted, we could see this being offered to existing Wi-Fi networks via an update; meaning the hassle of manually reconfiguring networks and tweaking hardware will be out of the question. This could mean the end of ridiculously slow wireless hotspots for us all.

Source: Engadget

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So what this is doing is the same as a lot of wireless routers at power on? They power up check local channel congestion and then select what it thinks is the best channel.
Just that this does it all the time meaning as someone already said above that channels will just get clogged completely if enough people use this in the same area?
Also I'm pretty sure that if you have a decent corporate Wireless controller with designated monitoring APs that already does this to adjust its own coverage and repair coverage by adjusting channels and signal strength to compensate for interference and downed access points.
Or at least that is what the Brocade/Motorola stuff does and I wouldn't class that as particularly high end. However this is not consumer grade technology but the principle is the same

My original statement is wrong, after reading the article on the NCSU site this article is also wrong
Neowin:-

The piece of software is called WiFox, and it works by diverting traffic away from clogged Wi-Fi channels allowing for improved data flow and maximum Wi-Fi performance.

from the NCSU website

Now NC State researchers have created WiFox, which monitors the amount of traffic on a WiFi channel and grants an access point priority to send its data when it detects that the access point is developing a backlog of data. The amount of priority the access point is given depends on the size of the backlog - the longer the backlog, the higher the priority. In effect, the program acts like a traffic cop, keeping the data traffic moving smoothly in both directions.

So basically it is traffic prioritization NOT by diverting traffic from busy channels, I can't help but think this will result in traffic loss though as the router gets given priority to delivery its traffic

"and it works by diverting traffic away from clogged Wi-Fi channels allowing for improved data flow and maximum Wi-Fi performance."
Sorry, what's new about this? I'm sure I've seen bt or virgin hubs doing this for many years now.
The fact people at a UNIVERSITY think they've developed the next best thing in wireless which is actually a common piece of advice is just laughable. What uni is that, north carolina? I'll be sure to add that to my **** university list.

n_K said,
"and it works by diverting traffic away from clogged Wi-Fi channels allowing for improved data flow and maximum Wi-Fi performance."
Sorry, what's new about this? I'm sure I've seen bt or virgin hubs doing this for many years now.
The fact people at a UNIVERSITY think they've developed the next best thing in wireless which is actually a common piece of advice is just laughable. What uni is that, north carolina? I'll be sure to add that to my **** university list.

Oh. Didn't realize a UK-only ISP made every single router in use today. Or rather, that they made their own routers at all.

SharpGreen said,

Oh. Didn't realize a UK-only ISP made every single router in use today. Or rather, that they made their own routers at all.

rebranded netgear

remixedcat said,

rebranded netgear

also I have no idea why they call em hubs when hubs are thier own type of devices that are 'dumber' then switches.

remixedcat said,

also I have no idea why they call em hubs when hubs are thier own type of devices that are 'dumber' then switches.

also I wonder if AMPED WIRELESS!! will have this new wifi tech in thier firmware shortly

xendrome said,
Also researchers have found a way to download more ram, you can just go here to upgrade your ram - http://www.downloadmoreram.com/

Oddly, I think if you could convince your OS to use cloud storage for swap space, this could almost be true. Also a serious performance hit.

And with distributed computing, perhaps you could "download" a few extra processors and THEIR ram instead.

Hey, great, enough people use this and they'll saturate ALL the channels instead of just one. Seriously, this is a no brainer. In the end, things will be worse than now.

a Wifi AP is, at best, as fast as the dial-up connection that's behind it. Considering that most of the time it's the router that's the bottleneck, this doesn't matter that much, except for convetions and stuff.

LauRoman said,
a Wifi AP is, at best, as fast as the dial-up connection that's behind it. Considering that most of the time it's the router that's the bottleneck, this doesn't matter that much, except for convetions and stuff.

For companies and individuals that use the Wifi AP connected to gigabit ethernet and primarily for sharing files and networking with other devices on the same LAN this is a major improvement if it really is possible.